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Proteomics research market estimated to reach $1.6 billion this year

Proteomics research market estimated to reach $1.6 billion this year

Pharmaceutical companies and diagnostics companies spend billions developing new drugs and tests, and this is translating into a sizeable market for the instruments that can assist them. This according to Kalorama Information, a healthcare market research publisher. Kalorama Information said instruments such as mass spectrometry, electrophoresis and liquid chromatography that can assist in the identification of drug targets and the validation of biomarkers, are in demand. [More]
Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

CQDM, Brain Canada and the Ontario Brain Institute award close to $8.5M to six (6) multi-disciplinary and multi-provincial research teams across Canada to address unmet needs in neuroscience within their Focus on Brain strategic initiative. To this amount, $1.5M is added from the various research entities involved as in-kind contributions. [More]

AACC receives three 2015 Hermes Creative Awards

AACC, a global scientific and medical professional organization dedicated to better health through laboratory medicine, is pleased to announce that it has received three 2015 Hermes Creative Awards. These awards recognize the association for the exceptional writing and design of its news publications and website, which help laboratory medicine professionals worldwide stay informed about important issues in the field and find solutions to challenging patient health problems. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]

New, noninvasive test can detect cocaine use through a simple fingerprint

Research published today in the journal Analyst has demonstrated a new, noninvasive test that can detect cocaine use through a simple fingerprint. [More]
E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

E-cigarette liquid flavors may alter key cellular functions in lung tissue

Certain flavorings used in electronic cigarette liquid may alter important cellular functions in lung tissue, according to new research presented at the 2015 American Thoracic Society International Conference. [More]
Differences in mechanical, chemical makeup of e-cigarettes can have adverse effects on human health

Differences in mechanical, chemical makeup of e-cigarettes can have adverse effects on human health

Unlike standard cigarettes, the components of electronic cigarettes are not regulated and standardized, thus they vary widely between products. [More]
New CLIP-PCR test could help diagnose malaria cases

New CLIP-PCR test could help diagnose malaria cases

One of the biggest difficulties faced by worldwide programs aimed at eliminating malaria is that the tests they use are not sensitive enough to detect all people who have the disease and need treatment. [More]
UM cell biologist advances research about behavior of cell proteins in neuroblastoma

UM cell biologist advances research about behavior of cell proteins in neuroblastoma

Patience and persistence are beginning to pay off for University of Montana Professor Mark Grimes, whose research about the behavior of cell proteins in childhood cancer recently was published by the Public Library of Science Computational Biology. [More]
Danish researchers discover way to map more than one protein at a time

Danish researchers discover way to map more than one protein at a time

Danish researchers at the University of Copenhagen have discovered how to map more than one protein at a time, when proteins repair damaged DNA. It is a discovery that will help accelerate the process of developing better and gentler cancer treatments. [More]
Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

Removing bacterial biofilms could help prevent and treat colon cancers, study suggests

A team led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine has uncovered a big clue to how bacteria may promote some colon cancers. [More]
Quantitative phosphoproteomic approach to identify targeted cancer therapy

Quantitative phosphoproteomic approach to identify targeted cancer therapy

Winner of the Louise Eisenhardt Traveling Scholarship Award, Teresa Purzner, MD, presented her research, Quantitative Phosphoproteomics for Targeted Cancer Therapy. [More]
Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Proteomics helps identify previously unrecognized proteins and pathways in nerve regeneration

Using proteomics techniques to study injured optic nerves, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital have identified previously unrecognized proteins and pathways involved in nerve regeneration. Adding back one of these proteins--the oncogene c-myc--they achieved unprecedented optic nerve regeneration in mice when combined with two other known strategies. [More]
Max Planck Institute researchers find protein profiles of DNA repair

Max Planck Institute researchers find protein profiles of DNA repair

During each cell division, more than 3.3 billion base pairs of genomic DNA have to be duplicated and segregated accurately to daughter cells. But what happens when the DNA template is damaged in such a way that the replication machinery gets stuck? To answer this question, scientists in the team of Matthias Mann at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried near Munich, with colleagues in Copenhagen and at Harvard, have analyzed how the protein composition of the DNA replication machinery changes upon encountering damaged DNA. [More]

US Liquid Handling Market estimated to reach $974 million in 2021

The trend of laboratories moving from manual methods to automated workflows is advancing momentum in the uptake of liquid handling instruments in the U.S. Stricter regulations and a growing focus on data precision, efficiency and reproducibility are driving the transition to automation in liquid handling. [More]

TUW, Medical University of Vienna jointly develop artificial blood vessels from elastomer material

Blocked blood vessels can quickly become dangerous. It is often necessary to replace a blood vessel - either by another vessel taken from the body or even by artificial vascular prostheses. Together, Vienna University of Technology and Vienna Medical University have developed artificial blood vessels made from a special elastomer material, which has excellent mechanical properties. [More]
Manchester scientists make key finding that could help deliver early test for kidney disease

Manchester scientists make key finding that could help deliver early test for kidney disease

Scientists at The University of Manchester have made an important finding that could help develop an early test for kidney disease. [More]
Women in science: an interview with Professor Dame Carol Robinson, University of Oxford

Women in science: an interview with Professor Dame Carol Robinson, University of Oxford

Professor Dame Carol Robinson has just been announced as the “L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women In Science” European Laureate for 2015... [More]
Analytical innovations top $10M in licensing income for PNNL, Battelle

Analytical innovations top $10M in licensing income for PNNL, Battelle

A suite of analytical innovations used to detect and measure very low levels of compounds and elements for environmental, national security and health applications has topped $10 million in licensing income for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and its operator Battelle. [More]
Researchers create 3D skin maps to detect molecular, microbial variations across the body

Researchers create 3D skin maps to detect molecular, microbial variations across the body

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences used information collected from hundreds of skin swabs to produce three-dimensional maps of molecular and microbial variations across the body. [More]
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