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SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

SINAPSE network enhances strengths to develop world-class future in medical imaging for Scotland

Scotland has a strong legacy as one of the pioneers of medical imaging. In the late 70s, Aberdeen University became the first institution to develop a full body MRI scanner; the system named the Mark I prototype was an enormous step forward for healthcare. [More]
Study looks at how incentives in Medicare Shared Savings Program may influence radiology practices

Study looks at how incentives in Medicare Shared Savings Program may influence radiology practices

A new study by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute examines how the incentives in an alternative payment model (APM) - the Accountable Care Organization Shared Savings Program - might influence cost, quality, utilization and technological investment for radiology practices. [More]
Penn State radiologists propose ways to improve safe, effective imaging of children worldwide

Penn State radiologists propose ways to improve safe, effective imaging of children worldwide

When a doctor recommends medical imaging for a child, parents may find themselves confused and concerned. [More]
Siemens launches new cloud-based network to help connect imaging departments across the UK

Siemens launches new cloud-based network to help connect imaging departments across the UK

Siemens Healthineers has launched its new cloud-based network, encouraging connectivity, comparison and collaboration across imaging departments in the UK. [More]
New collaboration set to deliver innovative MRI research facility at Institute of Translational Medicine

New collaboration set to deliver innovative MRI research facility at Institute of Translational Medicine

Thanks to an exciting collaboration between the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham (QEHB), medical charity Cobalt and Siemens Healthineers, the pioneering Institute of Translational Medicine (ITM) will benefit from an innovative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) research facility, to be known as the ‘ITM Imaging Centre’. [More]
New JGU cyclotron to be employed for research into potential applications in medicine

New JGU cyclotron to be employed for research into potential applications in medicine

A new particle accelerator is further enhancing the research landscape at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz. [More]
International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

International researchers discover 44 novel gene sites linked to hypertension

In papers receiving advance online publication in Nature Genetics, two international multi-institutional research teams describe identifying a total of 44 novel gene sites associated with hypertension or high blood pressure. [More]
Oncovision’s preclinical PET imaging business acquired in agreement with Bruker

Oncovision’s preclinical PET imaging business acquired in agreement with Bruker

PET and SPECT are key molecular imaging technologies for Bruker’s Preclinical Imaging division, allowing Bruker to offer the highest-performance SiPM-PET/SPECT/CT and integrated SiPM-PET/MR imaging systems. [More]
New vaccine against grass pollen allergies may help combat hepatitis B infection

New vaccine against grass pollen allergies may help combat hepatitis B infection

A new type of vaccine against grass pollen allergies (BM32) might also offer an effective treatment for combating hepatitis B infection. [More]
University of Arizona could contribute to improved tumor assessment with preclinical PET scanner for simultaneous PET/MRI

University of Arizona could contribute to improved tumor assessment with preclinical PET scanner for simultaneous PET/MRI

Cubresa Inc., a medical imaging company that develops and markets molecular imaging systems, today announced the successful installation of their compact PET scanner called NuPET™ for preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in the Department of Medical Imaging at the University of Arizona (UA). [More]
MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

MedUni Vienna scientists aim to identify prognostic markers for cutaneous lymphomas

Primary cutaneous lymphomas, cancers of the lymphatic system, occur in the skin and originate either from T-lymphocytes (T-cell lymphomas, incidence 75%) or in B-cell lymphocytes (B-cell lymphomas, 25%). [More]
KU Leuven researchers use microbubbles to evaluate effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment

KU Leuven researchers use microbubbles to evaluate effectiveness of cancer radiation treatment

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium, have developed a new way to evaluate whether a cancer radiation treatment is effective. [More]
Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Detection of malignant skin alterations is currently aided by optical microscopes such as dermoscopes or optical microscopes. While the latter offers high resolution, it comes with a major disadvantage, just like any other purely microscopic method: it only provides a partial view of the skin due to the low penetration depth. [More]
The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The evolution of medical imaging – where will innovation take us next?

The influence of medical imaging is constantly growing, diseases are detected earlier and treatments are becoming more effective. Within the last 25 years, cancer mortality rates have decreased by an impressive 25%. Advances in medical imaging have a big part to play in this achievement and we can expect that as technology continues to develop, mortality rates will drop even further. [More]
Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Research supports potential role for cognitive activity in prevention of Alzheimer's disease

Are there any ways of preventing or delaying the development of Alzheimer's disease or other forms of age-associated dementia? While several previously published studies have suggested a protective effect for cognitive activities such as reading, playing games or attending cultural events, questions have been raised about whether these studies reveal a real cause-and-effect relationship or if the associations could result from unmeasured factors. [More]
Dieting, exercise or combination of both equally effective in improving cardiovascular health

Dieting, exercise or combination of both equally effective in improving cardiovascular health

Which works better to improve the cardiovascular health of those who are overweight - dieting, exercise or a combination of both? A Saint Louis University study finds it doesn't matter which strategy you choose - it's the resulting weight loss that is the protective secret sauce. [More]
Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

Breast cancer screening provides framework for radiologist-led bundled payment models, study reports

According to a new report by the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, mammography may present an opportunity for the expanded use of bundled payments in radiology. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

Novel PET radiotracer reveals epigenetic activity in the human brain for the first time

A novel PET radiotracer developed at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital is able for the first time to reveal epigenetic activity - the process that determines whether or not genes are expressed - within the human brain. [More]
Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

Noninvasive approach using pulsed electric fields may reduce scarring after burn injuries

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has reported that repeated treatment with pulsed electric fields - a noninvasive procedure that does not generate heat - may help reduce the development of scarring. [More]
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