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Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

A compact PET scanner called NuPET has been commercially released for simultaneous preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in existing third-party MRI systems. [More]
Radiology experts urge awareness, accountability around medical scans for children

Radiology experts urge awareness, accountability around medical scans for children

Whether a child is complaining of intense stomach pain or has a head injury after a car crash, doctors may recommend a computed tomography, or CT scan, to investigate possible injuries. [More]
Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists develop innovative technique to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University (NTU Singapore) have invented a new way to deliver cancer drugs deep into tumour cells. [More]
MGH-led study confirms safety of allergy immunotherapy

MGH-led study confirms safety of allergy immunotherapy

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found no evidence of infections related to administration of allergy immunotherapy, the common practice of injecting minimal quantities of allergens beneath the skin to reduce the allergic response. [More]
Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

Study supports screening for HLA-B*5801 gene variant in Asian, black patients with gout

A multi-institutional study led by a Massachusetts General Hospital investigator finds significant racial disparities in the risk that patients being treated for gout will develop a serious, sometimes life-threatening adverse reaction to the most commonly prescribed medication. The increased risk closely correlates with the frequency of a gene variant previously associated with that adverse reaction, supporting recommendations to screen for that variant in patients from those populations. [More]
Increased expression of VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions

Increased expression of VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions

A Massachusetts General Hospital investigator has found that increased expression of the angiogenic factor VEGF-A promotes three common aging-related eye conditions - both versions of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and also cataracts - in an animal model. [More]
Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

People with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) fare better and are less likely to relapse when treated with medication on a long-term basis, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
MedUni Vienna researchers identify reason for chemoresistance in small cell lung cancer

MedUni Vienna researchers identify reason for chemoresistance in small cell lung cancer

Small cell lung cancer is not usually detected until it is at an advanced stage, when metastases have already formed. Chemotherapy is very effective initially but, within a year, cancer recurs and this time does not respond to a course of chemotherapy. The research group headed by Gerhard Hamilton, University Department of Surgery at MedUni Vienna, has now managed to identify the reason for this chemoresistance. [More]
Women who undergo uterine fibroid embolization experience improved sexual function

Women who undergo uterine fibroid embolization experience improved sexual function

Women who underwent a nonsurgical, image-guided treatment, uterine fibroid embolization (UFE), for the treatment of uterine fibroids experienced improved sexual function and a higher overall quality of life. The research, part of a French multicenter study, presented at the Society of Interventional Radiology's Annual Scientific Meeting, also found the vast majority of women treated with UFE sustained improvement for more than a year. [More]
Baricitinib drug shows significant success in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

Baricitinib drug shows significant success in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis

In a clinical phase-3-study, an international research cooperation of MedUni Vienna and Stanford University has achieved significant success with the drug Baricitinib for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. The test persons exhibited significantly less symptoms of the disorder. The results are now published in the top scientific journal "New England Journal of Medicine". [More]
Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit taking place in London

Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit taking place in London

As the fifth global RE•WORK conference focused on artificial intelligence, the Deep Learning in Healthcare Summit will bring together industry, academia and startups to explore revolutionary deep learning tools and techniques that are shaping the future of medicine, healthcare and diagnostics. [More]
Researchers clarify potential transmissibility of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers clarify potential transmissibility of Alzheimer's disease

MedUni Vienna researchers have published the results of a clarifying research study on the potential transmissibility of Alzheimer's disease. Although the protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, amyloid-β, might be transmissible under very unusual circumstances, this does not go along with a transmission of the clinical manifestation of Alzheimer's disease. The affected persons develop no clinical symptoms of the disease. [More]
Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

MedUni Vienna has made a crucial development in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Together with his team and the research group led by Gernot Schabbauer, international partners from Australia, Germany and Sweden, Christian Gruber, Chief Researcher at the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology has demonstrated in an animal model that, following treatment with a specially synthesized plant peptide (cyclotide), there is no further progression of the usual clinical signs of multiple sclerosis. [More]
MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

MGH study finds that the brains of young marijuana users react differently to social exclusion

A study from Massachusetts General Hospital researchers finds that the brains of young adult marijuana users react differently to social exclusion than do those of non-users. In a report published in the March issue of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging, the team reports that activation of the insula, a region of the brain that is usually active during social rejection, was reduced in young marijuana users when they were being excluded from participation in virtual game of catch. [More]
NIST researchers develop first widely useful standard for MRI of the breast

NIST researchers develop first widely useful standard for MRI of the breast

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have developed the first widely useful standard for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast, a method used to identify and monitor breast cancer. [More]
Doctors now have better tool to assess individual kidney function

Doctors now have better tool to assess individual kidney function

Doctors now have a much-improved tool to assess individual kidney function, thanks to the work of an international team led by University of Saskatchewan medical imaging specialists Drs. Carl and Michal Wesolowski. [More]
Siemens Healthcare launches new MR applications to help hospitals reduce scan times in neurology

Siemens Healthcare launches new MR applications to help hospitals reduce scan times in neurology

Siemens Healthcare has launched a range of new MR applications to help hospitals reduce the time needed for MR imaging within neurology. It is estimated that 20 to 25 per cent of all MR examinations are neurological, with the number expected to grow in 2016. [More]
Homeostasis may have allowed first living cells to maintain internal environment

Homeostasis may have allowed first living cells to maintain internal environment

A Massachusetts General Hospital research team investigating how the earliest stages of life might have developed has discovered a way the first living cells could have met a key challenge -- maintaining a constant internal environment, a process called homeostasis, even when external conditions change. [More]
MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

MGH researchers identify how Shigella injects proteins into target host cells

Researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases are investigating the mechanism by which several important pathogenic species of bacteria deliver proteins into the cells of the organisms they are infecting. [More]
Reconstructive surgery using custom-made spinal rods may improve outcomes

Reconstructive surgery using custom-made spinal rods may improve outcomes

Custom fit is the key when it comes to spinal implant rods, which an estimated 38,000 people need each year. This need is especially great for people who have a spinal deformity such as scoliosis, which causes the spine to twist and turn into complex and sometimes dangerous positions. In 2011, an estimated 1.6 million people received treatment for scoliosis according to the Bone and Joint Initiative, a consortium of professional medical societies. [More]
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