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BioClinica expands presence in Europe

BioClinica expands presence in Europe

BioClinica, Inc., the world's leading specialty clinical trial service provider, announced today the opening of new and expanded offices in London and Munich to better serve its growing client base in Europe. [More]

U.S. medical imaging market estimated to reach $82 million by 2019

Medical imaging is a notoriously data intensive field with its volume, variety and speed of data generation multiplying every day. Conventional tools are incapable of efficiently managing such large and complex datasets; posing limits on scalability, sustainability and usability. As the U.S. medical imaging field evolves from being not only data-intensive but also data-driven, big data tools are expected to better handle medical imaging, patient records, and improve workflow efficiency, diagnostic accuracy, treatment decisions and health management. [More]
Growth of lymph node metastases takes advantage of existing blood vessels

Growth of lymph node metastases takes advantage of existing blood vessels

While the use of antiangiogenesis drugs that block the growth of new blood vessels can improve the treatment of some cancers, clinical trials of their ability to prevent the development of new metastases have failed. Now a study from the Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center may have found at least one reason why. [More]
Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Siemens and BioNTech AG, a fully integrated biotechnology company developing truly personalized cancer immunotherapies, have entered into a strategic collaboration. [More]
Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Researchers develop protective vaccine against chlamydia infections

Chlamydiae are the most common, sexually transmitted, bacterial pathogens in the world. Every year around 100 million people contract Chlamydia infections, which are one of the main causes of female infertility and ectopic pregnancies and can also lead to blindness - especially in developing countries. [More]
Study describes how stress-reduction program helps reduce anxiety among high school students

Study describes how stress-reduction program helps reduce anxiety among high school students

Amid reports that rank today's teens as the most stressed generation in the country, a new study offers hope for helping them effectively manage stress and build long-term resiliency. [More]
Targeted molecular-imaging method could help identify early stages of prostate cancer

Targeted molecular-imaging method could help identify early stages of prostate cancer

A targeted molecular-imaging method under development at Rochester Institute of Technology could help detect early stages of prostate cancer and improve image-directed biopsies. [More]
New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

New Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging opens at MedUni Vienna

Today the new Christian Doppler Laboratory for Clinical Molecular MR Imaging (MOLIMA) was opened at the University Clinic of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine at MedUni Vienna. Its aim is to bring about a significant improvement in the prognosis or course of a disease. The research institute, which is funded by the Federal Ministry of Science, Research and Economy, develops high-resolution, quantitative imaging techniques to allow disease to be identified at an even earlier stage. [More]
New technology offers advanced detection in drug and other healthcare screenings

New technology offers advanced detection in drug and other healthcare screenings

A George Washington University professor has designed new technology that can identify traces of chemicals at 10-19 moles, a previously undetectable amount. This minute quantity can be conceptualized as 10 times below a billionth of a billionth of a teaspoon of water. [More]
DICOM Grid recognized with SIIA CODiE Award for Best Health and Medical Information Solution

DICOM Grid recognized with SIIA CODiE Award for Best Health and Medical Information Solution

DICOM Grid, the #1 medical image exchange vendor, announced today that it was recognized as the winner of the 2015 SIIA CODiE Award for Best Health and Medical Information Solution. Winners were announced today during a luncheon at the Mandarin Oriental in Washington, D.C. [More]
PAREXEL expands Perceptive MyTrials Data-Driven Monitoring solution

PAREXEL expands Perceptive MyTrials Data-Driven Monitoring solution

PAREXEL International Corporation, a leading global biopharmaceutical services provider, today launched next generation risk-based monitoring capabilities, expanding its Perceptive MyTrials Data-Driven Monitoring (DDM) solution. [More]
MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

MGH researchers develop new approach to skin rejuvenation

A new approach to skin rejuvenation developed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) may be less likely to have unintended side effects such as scarring and altered pigmentation. [More]
Two MGH physicians describe their experiences in Nepal earthquake relief efforts

Two MGH physicians describe their experiences in Nepal earthquake relief efforts

Two Massachusetts General Hospital physicians who participated in the international response to the major earthquakes that hit Nepal in April and May each describe their experiences in Perspectives articles receiving Online First publication today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

Identifying obstructive coronary artery disease in women: an interview with Dr. Ladapo, NYU School of Medicine

A recent study presented at the American College of Cardiology 64th Annual Scientific Meeting evaluated the impact of an age, sex, and gene expression score on clinical decision-making and the rate of further cardiac evaluation in symptomatic female patients suggestive of CAD in the outpatient setting. [More]
Cryoport to provide cryogenic logistics solutions to support personalized medicine efforts of CaRE Arthritis

Cryoport to provide cryogenic logistics solutions to support personalized medicine efforts of CaRE Arthritis

Cryoport, Inc., the leading provider of advanced cryogenic logistics solutions for the life sciences industry, serving markets including immunotherapies, stem cells, cell lines, clinical research organizations, vaccine manufacturers, animal health, and reproductive medicine, today announced that the Company is the preferred cryogenic logistics provider to CaRE Arthritis. [More]
MGH-CEM researchers develop novel approach to evaluate the liver's drug-metabolizing activity

MGH-CEM researchers develop novel approach to evaluate the liver's drug-metabolizing activity

A team of researchers from the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine (MGH-CEM) has developed a novel approach that dramatically simplifies the evaluation of the liver's drug-metabolizing activity and the potential toxic effects of the products of that activity on other organs. [More]
MedUni Vienna uses new MR technique to classify adenomas

MedUni Vienna uses new MR technique to classify adenomas

Adenomas are rare liver tumours, a certain percentage of which can become malignant. Using a new MR (magnetic resonance) technique at MedUni Vienna, it is now possible to classify adenomas without subjecting patients to invasive tissue sampling procedures. [More]

OmniVision introduces CameraChip sensor for medical and industrial applications

OmniVision Technologies, Inc., a leading developer of advanced digital imaging solutions, today announced a new ultra-compact CameraChip sensor for medical and industrial applications. [More]
Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

Researchers identify gene variant that makes breast cancer cells more aggressive

A particular human gene variant makes breast cancer cells more aggressive. Not only are these more resistant to chemotherapy but also leave the primary tumour and establish themselves in other parts of the body in the form of metastases. An international group of researchers led by Lukas Kenner of MedUni Vienna has now identified a gene, AF1q, as being substantially responsible for this and recognized it as a possible starting point for more accurate diagnosis and potential targeted therapeutic approaches. [More]
MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

MGH researchers develop bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation

A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has made the first steps towards development of bioartificial replacement limbs suitable for transplantation. In their report, which has been published online in the journal Biomaterials, the researchers describe using an experimental approach previously used to build bioartificial organs to engineer rat forelimbs with functioning vascular and muscle tissue. [More]
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