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UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. [More]
Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and it's also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths. If caught early enough though, it is almost always curable. Now a camera, capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient's skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives. [More]
Longer telomeres increase melanoma risk

Longer telomeres increase melanoma risk

A leading Dartmouth researcher, working with The Melanoma Genetics Consortium, GenoMEL, an international research consortium, co-authored a paper published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that proves longer telomeres increase the risk of melanoma. [More]
Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine, Wistar Institute awarded NCI grants for four new melanoma research projects

Penn Medicine and The Wistar Institute have been awarded a prestigious $12.1 million SPORE grant from the National Cancer Institute. The five-year Specialized Programs of Research Excellence, or SPORE, grant will fund four new melanoma research projects that aim to translate fundamental laboratory discoveries into new therapeutics to treat melanoma and other skin cancers. [More]
Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Study evaluates impact of myPath Melanoma diagnostic test

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today presented results from a pivotal clinical utility study of the Myriad myPath- Melanoma test at the 2014 College of American Pathologists (CAP) annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

Genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely driving force behind human skin cancers

A genetic mutation caused by ultraviolet light is likely the driving force behind millions of human skin cancers, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Scientists study about rare type of skin cancer, acral melanomas

Scientists study about rare type of skin cancer, acral melanomas

Acral melanomas, the rare type of skin cancer that caused musician Bob Marley's death, are genetically distinct from other types of skin cancer. [More]
Anti-EphA3 antibody has anti-tumour effects against solid cancers

Anti-EphA3 antibody has anti-tumour effects against solid cancers

An international team of scientists has shown that an antibody against the protein EphA3, found in the micro-environment of solid cancers, has anti-tumour effects. [More]
Melanoma in adulthood can be reduced by consistent use of sunscreen in childhood

Melanoma in adulthood can be reduced by consistent use of sunscreen in childhood

Research conducted at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute, published in the latest issue of the scientific journal Pigment Cell and Melanoma, has established unequivocally in a natural animal model that the incidence of malignant melanoma in adulthood can be dramatically reduced by the consistent use of sunscreen in infancy and childhood. [More]
New vaccine reprograms pancreatic tumors and makes them vulnerable to immunotherapy

New vaccine reprograms pancreatic tumors and makes them vulnerable to immunotherapy

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed and tested a vaccine that triggered the growth of immune cell nodules within pancreatic tumors, essentially reprogramming these intractable cancers and potentially making them vulnerable to immune-based therapies. [More]
Study suggests new targets for treating rare genetic disorder and cancer

Study suggests new targets for treating rare genetic disorder and cancer

The combined action of two enzymes, Srs2 and Exo1, prevents and repairs common genetic mutations in growing yeast cells, according to a new study led by scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center. [More]
Pivotal clinical validation study of Myriad myPath Melanoma test presented at ASCO 2014

Pivotal clinical validation study of Myriad myPath Melanoma test presented at ASCO 2014

Myriad Genetics, Inc. today presented results from a pivotal clinical validation study of the Myriad myPath- Melanoma test at the 2014 American Society of Clinical Oncology annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Rare type of melanoma that attacks palms, soles twice likely to recur, says NYU study

Rare type of melanoma that attacks palms, soles twice likely to recur, says NYU study

A rare type of melanoma that disproportionately attacks the palms and soles and under the nails of Asians, African-Americans, and Hispanics, who all generally have darker skins, and is not caused by sun exposure, is almost twice as likely to recur than other similar types of skin cancer, according to results of a study in 244 patients. [More]
Substance from pine bark is a potential source for treating melanoma

Substance from pine bark is a potential source for treating melanoma

A substance that comes from pine bark is a potential source for a new treatment of melanoma, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. [More]

Cancer Council urges Queenslanders to get to know their own skin

Cancer Council is urging Queenslanders to get to know their own skin and stay vigilant about early detection, with reports of misdiagnosis for some types of melanoma in the Australasian Journal of Dermatology. [More]

ABCDE rule outlines warning signs of melanoma

It is estimated that one in five Americans will be diagnosed with skin cancer in the course of their lifetime, and one person dies from melanoma - the deadliest form of skin cancer - every hour. [More]
Sun tanning equals skin damage: New awareness campaign

Sun tanning equals skin damage: New awareness campaign

It only takes a few bad sunburns or trips to the tanning bed to put someone at risk for melanoma. Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in the United States and when left untreated, melanoma is the most dangerous and aggressive form. It accounts for more than 9,000 of the 12,000-plus skin cancer deaths each year. In observance of May's Melanoma and Skin Cancer Awareness Month Seattle Cancer Care Alliance (SCCA) is focusing on helping teens keep their skin safe this spring with a new infographic. [More]
Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday: Mount Sinai experts to share vital skin cancer tips

Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday: Mount Sinai experts to share vital skin cancer tips

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with one in five Americans developing it over the course of their lives. It's also one of the most preventable types of cancers. In recognition of May's Skin Cancer Awareness Month and Melanoma Monday on May 5th, Mount Sinai Health System experts are arming the public with vital tips on prevention and offering FREE skin cancer screenings. [More]
Combination therapy with MEK and BRAF inhibitors for anaplastic thyroid cancer proves effective

Combination therapy with MEK and BRAF inhibitors for anaplastic thyroid cancer proves effective

Researchers from the Jacks Laboratory at MIT's Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research (KI) have developed and characterized a genetically engineered mouse that successfully models progression from papillary thyroid cancer, which has an excellent prognosis, to anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC), a highly lethal disease. [More]
Research shows that men living alone have reduced melanoma-specific survival

Research shows that men living alone have reduced melanoma-specific survival

There are differences in prognosis in cutaneous malignant melanoma depending on cohabitation status and gender, according to a new study published in the scientific periodical Journal of Clinical Oncology. Single men of all ages are more likely to die of their disease. [More]