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New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

New research links megalin protein with malignant melanomas

Today it is not possible to predict spreading from malignant melanomas. Melanoma metastases are furthermore extremely difficult to eliminate as traditional treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy is mostly ineffective. Only ten per cent of the patients survive once they reach an advanced stage with distant metastases. [More]
Subpopulation of tumor cells make melanoma aggressive

Subpopulation of tumor cells make melanoma aggressive

KU Leuven researchers have zeroed in on what makes cancer cells in melanoma so aggressive. They also succeeded in taming the effect in cell cultures. [More]
People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

People with high-risk tumors containing BRAF or NRAS gene mutations have lower survival rates

Researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed hundreds of melanoma samples to find out if two genetic mutations more commonly found in melanoma tumors were associated with lower survival rates in patients. [More]
UQDI reveals that Anisina drug can kill melanoma cells

UQDI reveals that Anisina drug can kill melanoma cells

US-Australian drug discovery company, Novogen, today announced that studies conducted at The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute revealed that experimental drug, Anisina, killed melanoma cells irrespective of their mutational status. [More]
CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

CXCR3 molecule is key mediator of melanoma metastasis, shows research

In a unique partnership demonstrating excellence in "team science," Dartmouth investigators from Norris Cotton Cancer Center identified a role for the molecule CXCR3 (widely known to regulate the migration of immune cells) as a key mediator of melanoma metastasis. [More]
Personalized cancer vaccines can be used to marshal powerful immune response

Personalized cancer vaccines can be used to marshal powerful immune response

Personalized melanoma vaccines can be used to marshal a powerful immune response against unique mutations in patients' tumors, according to early data in a first-in-people clinical trial at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

Discovery may lead to new potential treatment for drug-resistant melanoma

In the last several years, targeted therapies - drugs that directly impact specific genes and proteins involved in the progression of cancer - have been approved for a wide variety of cancers, including melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Now, researchers at The Wistar Institute have discovered one way in which melanoma becomes resistant to a particular form of targeted therapy, and understanding this phenomenon may lead to a new melanoma target or prompt new designs of these treatments. [More]
Myriad Publishes myPath™ Melanoma Pivotal Validation Study in the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology

Myriad Publishes myPath™ Melanoma Pivotal Validation Study in the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology

Myriad Genetics, Inc. (NASDAQ: MYGN) today announced the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology published data from a pivotal clinical validation study that showed the myPath™ Melanoma test is highly effective at differentiating benign skin moles from malignant melanoma with greater than 90 percent diagnostic accuracy. Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and more than 76,000 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed each year in the United States. [More]
Oraya's IRay Radiotherapy system gets CE Mark to treat choroidal metastases

Oraya's IRay Radiotherapy system gets CE Mark to treat choroidal metastases

Oraya Therapeutics announced today that the Oraya IRay® Radiotherapy system has received a CE Mark extension for the treatment of choroidal metastases, a cancer in the eye, originating most commonly from primary sites in the breast or lung. [More]
Pediatric Cancer Genome Project identifies genetic basis of three pediatric melanoma subtypes

Pediatric Cancer Genome Project identifies genetic basis of three pediatric melanoma subtypes

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital—Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project found that melanoma in some adolescent and adult patients involves many of the same genetic alterations and would likely respond to the same therapy. [More]
MD Anderson researchers find way to predict patients who may respond to BRAF inhibitors

MD Anderson researchers find way to predict patients who may respond to BRAF inhibitors

Powerful drugs known as BRAF-inhibitors have been crucial for melanoma patients, saving lives through their ability to turn off the BRAF protein's power to spur cancer cell growth. [More]
Moffitt physicians promote novel screening strategies to decrease melanoma mortality

Moffitt physicians promote novel screening strategies to decrease melanoma mortality

Melanoma, the most deadly type of skin cancer, was to blame for approximately 9,700 deaths in 2014. And with the number of melanoma cases increasing each year, it is believed that the disease could become one of the most common types of cancer in the United States by 2030. Promoting and developing national screening strategies may help to reduce deaths due to melanoma. [More]
A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

A*STAR's GIS scientists develop new system that can predict treatment targets for cancer

In recent months, several national initiatives for personalized medicine have been announced, including the recently launched precision medicine initiative in the US, driven by rapid advances in genomic technologies and with the promise of cheaper and better healthcare. Significant challenges remain, however, in the management and analysis of genetic information and their integration with patient data. [More]

New app for clinical detection of skin cancer launched on World Cancer Day

On World Cancer Day 2015, general practitioners, physicians and dermatologists in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia are being asked for their feedback during the advanced trial phase of a new, free app that has the potential to play a vital role in the clinical detection of skin cancer. [More]
Researchers identify mutations that destabilize DNA structure that turns a gene off

Researchers identify mutations that destabilize DNA structure that turns a gene off

Researchers at the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center have identified for the first time mutations that destabilize a DNA structure that turns a gene off. These mutations occur at four specific sites in what is known as the "hTERT promoter" in more than 75 percent of glioblastomas and melanomas. [More]
FL118 agent shows efficacy as personalized, targeted therapy for certain cancer tumors

FL118 agent shows efficacy as personalized, targeted therapy for certain cancer tumors

A team led by Fengzhi Li, PhD, and Xinjiang Wang, PhD, of Roswell Park Cancer Institute has reported new findings regarding therapeutic targets of the novel anticancer agent FL118. Previous studies from these researchers have showed that FL118 induces cancer cell death, or apoptosis, by inhibiting expression of multiple cell-survival proteins (survivin, Mcl-1, XIAP or cIAP2). [More]
Study reports anti-cancer activity in mice treated with experimental drug TAK-733

Study reports anti-cancer activity in mice treated with experimental drug TAK-733

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online this week in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics reports anti-cancer activity in 10 out of 11 patient tumor samples grown in mice and treated with the experimental drug TAK-733, a small molecule inhibitor of MEK1/2. [More]
UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

UCSD researchers define epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have, for the first time, clearly defined the epidemiology of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST), which occur primarily in the lining of the stomach and small intestine. [More]
Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Gigapixel whole-body photographic camera may help doctors spot cancer early, save lives

Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer type in the United States, and it's also the deadliest form of skin cancer, causing more than 75 percent of skin-cancer deaths. If caught early enough though, it is almost always curable. Now a camera, capable of taking snapshots of the entire human body and rendering high-resolution images of a patient's skin may help doctors spot cancer early and save lives. [More]
Longer telomeres increase melanoma risk

Longer telomeres increase melanoma risk

A leading Dartmouth researcher, working with The Melanoma Genetics Consortium, GenoMEL, an international research consortium, co-authored a paper published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute that proves longer telomeres increase the risk of melanoma. [More]
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