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New mental health assessment tool expedites patient's crime risk evaluation

New mental health assessment tool expedites patient's crime risk evaluation

Washington State University researchers have developed a new assessment tool to gauge the risk that someone with a mental illness will commit a crime. It could also speed up long-delayed competency evaluations for people awaiting trial. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

DIEP flap breast reconstruction improves long-term quality of life for breast cancer patients

For women who have undergone mastectomy for breast cancer, breast reconstruction using the abdominal "DIEP flap" provides good long-term quality of life (QOL)—similar to that of women without breast cancer, reports a study in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
People diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis often left with little or no support for emotional problems

People diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis often left with little or no support for emotional problems

In a new University of Manchester study, people with psoriatic arthritis have told researchers about the condition's deeply damaging mental effects and how healthcare services failed to prepare them for its reality. [More]
UAB receives $2.86 million NIH grant to study effectiveness of cognitive training in older adults with HAND

UAB receives $2.86 million NIH grant to study effectiveness of cognitive training in older adults with HAND

University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing Professor David Vance, Ph.D., has received a five-year, $2.86 million R01 grant from the National Institute of Mental Health for a study to determine whether quality of life of middle-aged and older adults with HIV can be improved by enhancing cognitive functioning through speed of processing training. [More]
Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

Nutritional supplements can enhance effectiveness of antidepressants

An international evidence review has found that certain nutritional supplements can increase the effectiveness of antidepressants for people with clinical depression. [More]
Early maternal support boosts robust brain growth in kids

Early maternal support boosts robust brain growth in kids

Children whose mothers were nurturing during the preschool years, as opposed to later in childhood, have more robust growth in brain structures associated with learning, memory and stress response than children with less supportive moms, according to research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Lab-grown mini-brains shed light on health crisis posed by Zika virus in fetal brains

Studying a new type of pinhead-size, lab-grown brain made with technology first suggested by three high school students, Johns Hopkins researchers have confirmed a key way in which Zika virus causes microcephaly and other damage in fetal brains: by infecting specialized stem cells that build its outer layer, the cortex. [More]
Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Study reveals best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans

Cocaine use has increased substantially among African Americans in some of the most underserved areas of the United States. Interventions designed to increase connection to and support from non-drug using family and friends, with access to employment, the faith community, and education, are the best ways to reduce substance use among African Americans and other minorities in low-income, resource-poor communities, concludes a study led by a medical anthropologist at the University of California, Riverside. [More]
Increasing specialist community services reduces suicide rates in NHS mental health services in England

Increasing specialist community services reduces suicide rates in NHS mental health services in England

Increasing specialist community services like crisis resolution, helping make the transition to adult services smoother for young people, and implementing clinical guidelines are just some of the service changes that are linked to significantly reduced suicide rates in mental health services in England over the last 16 years, according to new research published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. [More]
Motivational interviewing can help reduce risky use of pain pills

Motivational interviewing can help reduce risky use of pain pills

As America battles an epidemic of deaths from misused pain pills, a new study suggests an inexpensive way to cut risky use of these drugs by people who have a high chance of overdosing. [More]
Antidepressant Wellbutrin linked to long-term modest weight loss

Antidepressant Wellbutrin linked to long-term modest weight loss

Group Health researchers have found that bupropion (marketed as Wellbutrin) is the only antidepressant that tends to be linked to long-term modest weight loss. [More]

Utah researchers link military sexual trauma to higher risk for veteran homelessness

The devastating consequences of sexual trauma in the military reported by 25 percent of female and 1 percent of male veterans who served in the U.S. armed forces don't end with psychological and physical trauma, but are associated with a much higher risk for homelessness, a study led by Utah researchers has found. [More]
Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

Scientists find interaction between amyloid and tau proteins that cause brain damage linked with AD

For years, neuroscientists have puzzled over how two abnormal proteins, called amyloid and tau, accumulate in the brain and damage it to cause Alzheimer's disease (AD). Which one is the driving force behind dementia? The answer: both of them, according to a new study by researchers at the Douglas Mental Health University Institute. [More]
Study explores effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care for depressed teenagers

Study explores effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in primary care for depressed teenagers

Depressed teenagers who received cognitive behavioral therapy in their primary care clinic recovered faster, and were also more likely to recover, than teens who did not receive the primary care-based counseling, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics. [More]
Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Patients who survived life-threatening illness in ICU at increased risk for psychiatric symptoms

Results of a multi-institutional national study of nearly 700 people who survived life-threatening illness with a stay in an intensive care unit (ICU) suggest that a substantial majority of them are at high risk for persistent depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder — especially if they are female, young and unemployed. [More]
Savouring positive memories can boost mood in individuals with mental health problems

Savouring positive memories can boost mood in individuals with mental health problems

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have published a study highlighting the effectiveness of using positive memories and images to help generate positive emotions. [More]
Researchers reveal that numerous health websites mislead public on risks of nicotine products

Researchers reveal that numerous health websites mislead public on risks of nicotine products

Millions of people visit the websites of the Mayo Clinic, American Cancer Society and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others, seeking authoritative health information. But are they receiving it? [More]
FDA expands campaign to educate rural, white male teens about dangers of smokeless tobacco use

FDA expands campaign to educate rural, white male teens about dangers of smokeless tobacco use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today it is expanding its award-winning "The Real Cost" campaign to educate rural, white male teenagers about the negative health consequences associated with smokeless tobacco use. For the first time, messages on the dangers of smokeless tobacco use – including nicotine addiction, gum disease, tooth loss, and multiple kinds of cancer – are being highlighted through the placement of advertisements in 35 U.S. markets specifically selected to reach the campaign's target audience. [More]
Researchers examine effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs to prevent or treat delirium

Researchers examine effectiveness of antipsychotic drugs to prevent or treat delirium

In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers examined whether or not antipsychotic drugs, which are sometimes used to prevent or treat delirium, are effective. [More]
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