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Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

Endovascular therapy best treatment option for stroke patients

A research paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) today confirms earlier findings that a procedure called endovascular therapy (ET) for ischemic stroke is the best treatment option for many patients by reducing the incidents of disability. [More]
Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Tonix expert examines ways to improve sleep problems and provide relief to people with PTSD

Sleep problems—a common condition among military personnel—may increase the risk of developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other mental health conditions. So concludes a team of researchers at the RAND Corporation, whose study—published on RAND's website—was recently described in national media outlets. [More]
Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Adapting new method to judge dementia perceptions can help improve care for south Asian people

Dementia care for south Asian people could be improved after researchers from The University of Manchester adapted a commonly used tool for judging perceptions of the disease. [More]
Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people visit health care settings before attempting suicide, study finds

Most people who attempt suicide make some type of healthcare visit in the weeks or months before the attempt, reports a study in the May issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer. [More]
India and Canada announce funding to improve maternal, child health in India

India and Canada announce funding to improve maternal, child health in India

Grand Challenges Canada, funded by the Government of Canada, and the Grand Challenges India initiative of the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India, today announced an investment of $2.5 million (CAD) in five health innovations in India. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

Johns Hopkins researchers link sperm with specific 'epigenetic tags' to autism

In a small study, Johns Hopkins researchers found that DNA from the sperm of men whose children had early signs of autism shows distinct patterns of regulatory tags that could contribute to the condition. A detailed report of their findings will be published online in the International Journal of Epidemiology on April 15. [More]
fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

fMRI can predict language development outcomes in ASD toddlers

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), University of California, San Diego School of Medicine researchers say it may be possible to predict future language development outcomes in toddlers with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), even before they've been formally diagnosed with the condition. [More]
Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

Simple dietary intervention can help reduce weight gain

A University of Calgary study has found that rats fed a fibre supplement while on a high fat and high sugar diet show a much lower weight gain than those who did not eat the fibre. A team of researchers from the university's Cumming School of Medicine and the Faculty of Kinesiology says the study helps scientists better understand the mechanisms of weight control and energy balance. [More]
Northwestern Medicine launches mobile 'therapist' to combat depression, anxiety

Northwestern Medicine launches mobile 'therapist' to combat depression, anxiety

Feeling blue or anxious? Now, there's a mobile 'therapist' designed to understand you and suggest the ideal mini-app to lift your particular mood. [More]
Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

Study: 9% of U.S. adults have impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns

An estimated 9 percent of adults in the U.S. have a history of impulsive, angry behavior and have access to guns, according to a study published this month in Behavioral Sciences and the Law. The study also found that an estimated 1.5 percent of adults report impulsive anger and carry firearms outside their homes. [More]
RAND report examines sleep problems in U.S. military members

RAND report examines sleep problems in U.S. military members

Improving the quality and quantity of U.S. military members' sleep following deployment could help reduce other health problems, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

CVS Health Foundation announces new grant recipients to increase access to health care

The CVS Health Foundation, a private foundation created by CVS Health Corporation (NYSE: CVS), today announced 55 new grant recipients as part of its multi-year, $5 million commitment to increase access to health care in communities nationwide. [More]
Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

Younger patients can benefit from ACL surgery

A new study appearing in the April issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery (JBJS), found that most patients who underwent surgery to repair and rebuild an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear, showed significant improvement in physical function at two years, which continued for at least six years following surgery. [More]
Family stressors during childhood are associated with weight gain

Family stressors during childhood are associated with weight gain

Adolescent obesity is a national public health concern and, unchecked, places young people on a trajectory for a variety of health issues as they grow older. [More]
Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

Study estimates prevalence of treatment-related chronic diseases among childhood cancer survivors

The number of childhood cancer survivors in the U.S. has increased, but the majority of those who have survived five or more years after diagnosis face chronic health problems related to their treatment, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study in collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. [More]
Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Antipsychotic drugs may elevate child's risk for weight gain, type II diabetes

Today in JAMA Pediatrics, researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's (CHOP) PolicyLab published the largest study to date documenting the significant risks to children's health associated with prescription antipsychotics, a powerful a class of medications used to treat mental and behavioral health disorders. [More]
Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

Research shows that hippocampus is dedicated to memory formation, not to spatial skills

In work that reconciles two competing views of brain structures involved in memory and spatial perception, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have conducted experiments that suggest the hippocampus - a small region in the brain's limbic system - is dedicated largely to memory formation and not to spatial skills, such as navigation. [More]
Study demonstrates effective tool for enhancing recognition of adolescent depression

Study demonstrates effective tool for enhancing recognition of adolescent depression

Training pediatric primary care providers to screen and assess depression and suicide risk in adolescent patients improved providers' confidence and knowledge of these conditions and increased frequency of screenings for this critical patient population. The study, published in the May/June issue of Academic Pediatrics, demonstrates an effective tool for improving recognition of adolescent depression. [More]
Study sheds light on how brain networks contribute to OCD in children

Study sheds light on how brain networks contribute to OCD in children

A new study by scientists at the Wayne State University School of Medicine demonstrates that communication between some of the brain's most important centers is altered in children with obsessive-compulsive disorder. [More]
Depression associated with elevated risk for physical diseases

Depression associated with elevated risk for physical diseases

Those suffering from depressive symptoms have an increased risk for physical diseases, especially for arthrosis and arthritis. These findings were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Ruhr-University Bochum. Their results, based on data from 14,300 people living in Switzerland, have been published in the scientific journal "Frontiers in Public Health". [More]
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