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Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Rogers' regional medical director to address issue of childhood anxiety at NATSAP conference

Stephanie C. Eken, M.D., F.A.A.P., a regional medical director with Rogers Behavioral Health System, will address the issue of childhood anxiety at the 2015 National Association of Therapeutic Schools and Programs (NATSAP) conference on February 6 in Nashville, TN. [More]
Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

Brain inflammation linked to clinical depression

A new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health found that the measure of brain inflammation in people who were experiencing clinical depression was increased by 30 per cent. The findings, published today in JAMA Psychiatry, have important implications for developing new treatments for depression. [More]
Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers advance generalized concept for future studies of mental resilience

Researchers at the Research Center Translational Neurosciences of Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have advanced a generalized concept as the basis for future studies of mental resilience. Their new approach is based on a mechanistic theory which takes as its starting point the appraisals made by the brain in response to exposure to stressful or threatening situations. [More]
Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Improving prefrontal cortex activity could help autistic people regulate emotions

Tantrums, irritability, self-injury, depression, anxiety. These symptoms are associated with autism, but they're not considered core symptoms of the disorder. Researchers from the UNC School of Medicine are challenging this assertion. They have used functional MRI to show that - when it comes to the ability to regulate emotions - brain activity in autistic people is significantly different than brain activity in people without autism. [More]
Doctoral thesis finds how parental time pressure leads to mental health problems among children

Doctoral thesis finds how parental time pressure leads to mental health problems among children

A doctor's thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy has found that children whose parents experience time pressure are more likely to have mental health problems. [More]
Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Study shows differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in autistic children

Brain scans confirm significant differences in play behavior, brain activation patterns and stress levels in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as compared with typically developing children. [More]
Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Majority of Canada's homeless adults with mental illness show evidence of cognitive deficits

Nearly three-quarters of homeless adults with mental illness in Canada show evidence of cognitive deficits, such as difficulties with problem solving, learning and memory, new research has found. [More]
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Alcohol drinking pattern influences risk of cirrhosis

Approximately 170,000 people die from alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver in Europe every year. Although alcohol is the most important risk factor, less is known about the significance of different patterns of drinking. Currently scientists believe that cirrhosis is a function of the volume of alcohol consumed irrespective of patterns of drinking. Investigators have now established that alcohol drinking pattern has a significant influence on the risk of cirrhosis and that daily drinking increases that risk compared with drinking less frequently. [More]
International study identifies genetic factors that influence the size of brain structures

International study identifies genetic factors that influence the size of brain structures

An international study, which included researchers from NUI Galway, has identified significant genetic factors that influence the size of structures within the brain. It is hoped these new insights may help scientists better understand disorders such as schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. [More]
UCLA researchers find new treatment that restores normal social behavior in autism mice model

UCLA researchers find new treatment that restores normal social behavior in autism mice model

Among the problems people with Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) struggle with are difficulties with social behavior and communication. That can translate to an inability to make friends, engage in routine conversations, or pick up on the social cues that are second nature to most people. Similarly, in a mouse model of ASD, the animals, like humans, show little interest in interacting or socializing with other mice. [More]
Improving sleep early in life may delay age-related changes in memory

Improving sleep early in life may delay age-related changes in memory

Sound sleep in young and middle-aged people helps memory and learning, but as they hit their seventh, eighth and ninth decades, they don't sleep as much or as well -- and sleep is no longer linked so much to memory, a Baylor researcher says. [More]
Study identifies gene that may become resistant to current testicular cancer treatments

Study identifies gene that may become resistant to current testicular cancer treatments

A major research study has uncovered several new genetic mutations that could drive testicular cancer - and also identified a gene which may contribute to tumours becoming resistant to current treatments. [More]

Study: Classic psychedelics may hold great promise in preventing suicide

Classic psychedelics, such as LSD, psilocybin mushrooms and mescaline, previously have been shown to occasion lasting improvements in mental health. But researchers led by University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health investigators wanted to advance the existing research and determine whether classic psychedelics might be protective with regard to suicidal thoughts. [More]
Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Personalized approaches to treating intellectual disability

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced an approach that protects animal models against a type of genetic disruption that causes intellectual disability, including serious memory impairments and altered anxiety levels. [More]
Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Prenatal program enhances couples' co-parenting relationship, improves childhood outcomes

Children whose parents participated in a prenatal program aimed at enhancing couples' co-parenting relationship were better adjusted at age seven than children whose parents were assigned to a control group, according to Penn State researchers. [More]
Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group helps boost overall health

Joining a walking group is one of the best and easiest ways to boost overall health, with virtually no side effects, suggests an analysis of the available evidence, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. [More]

Brain uses separate pathway to recall old fear memories

People with anxiety disorders, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), often experience prolonged and exaggerated fearfulness. Now, an animal study suggests that this might involve disruption of a gradual shifting of brain circuitry for retrieving fear memories. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have discovered in rats that an old fear memory is recalled by a separate brain pathway from the one originally used to recall it when it was fresh. [More]
WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

WHO calls for urgent action to reduce premature deaths from noncommunicable diseases

Urgent government action is needed to meet global targets to reduce the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and prevent the annual toll of 16 million people dying prematurely - before the age of 70 - from heart and lung diseases, stroke, cancer and diabetes, according to a new WHO report. [More]
TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

TSRI scientists identify novel synthetic compound that reduces activity of a cancer-related protein

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a novel synthetic compound that sharply inhibits the activity of a protein that plays an important role in in the progression of breast and pancreatic cancers. [More]