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Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Educating parents on healthy infant sleep-related behaviors may help prevent childhood obesity

Teaching parents bedtime techniques to encourage healthy sleep habits in their infants may help prevent obesity, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. Strong links exist between inadequate sleep and childhood obesity. [More]
Global survey reveals 84% of psoriasis patients suffer discrimination, humiliation

Global survey reveals 84% of psoriasis patients suffer discrimination, humiliation

Novartis today released new results from the largest global survey to date of people with psoriasis. [More]
Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Rare inherited gene mutations may contribute to severe forms of bipolar disorder

Using so-called next-generation genome sequencing, researchers at Johns Hopkins have identified 84 potential inherited gene mutations that may contribute to the most severe forms of bipolar disorder. About 5.6 million Americans are estimated to have bipolar disorder. [More]
LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

LGB adults experience higher rates of distress, impaired physical health than heterosexuals

In one of the largest, most representative health surveys conducted to date, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults reported substantially higher rates of severe psychological distress, heavy drinking and smoking, and impaired physical health than did heterosexuals. [More]
Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Study shows one in five individuals from U.S. military sample have obesity

Despite being held to stringent weight and body fat standards, newly published research shows that one in five individuals from a sample of U.S. military personnel from 2001 - 2008 have obesity. [More]
Centrally assisted collaborative telecare model improves PTSD/depression symptoms in soldiers

Centrally assisted collaborative telecare model improves PTSD/depression symptoms in soldiers

Military members who visited a primary care clinic while suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and depression reported fewer symptoms and better mental health functioning a year after enrolling in a treatment program that included specially trained care managers and telephone therapy options, according to a new study conducted by RTI International, RAND and the Department of Defense Deployment Health Clinical Center. [More]
Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

Regular park visits for 30 minutes may help prevent high blood pressure and mental health problems

People who visit parks for 30 minutes or more each week are much less likely to have high blood pressure or poor mental health than those who don't, according to new research by Australian and UK environmental scientists. [More]
African Americans perceive depression as weakness rather than health condition

African Americans perceive depression as weakness rather than health condition

Depression in African Americans, according to Sirry Alang, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology at Lehigh University, is expressed in ways that are inconsistent with symptoms of depression laid out in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. [More]
Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Study finds dramatic increase in nonmedical use of prescription opioids in the U.S.

Nonmedical use of prescription opioids more than doubled among adults in the United States from 2001-2002 to 2012-2013, based on a study from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health. Nearly 10 million Americans, or 4.1 percent of the adult population, used opioid medications in 2012-2013 a class of drugs that includes OxyContin and Vicodin, without a prescription or not as prescribed (in greater amounts, more often, or longer than prescribed) in the past year. [More]
Scientists discover RNA methylation could strengthen memory formation

Scientists discover RNA methylation could strengthen memory formation

New insight into the process that converts experiences into stable long-term memories has been uncovered by neurobiologists from the University of California, Irvine and the University of Queensland. [More]
JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

JAMA edition provides summary of FSMB policy recommendations about marijuana in patient care

The Journal of the American Medical Association has published in its online edition a summary of new policy adopted by the Federation of State Medical Boards that provides recommendations about marijuana in patient care and a cautionary note advising actively licensed physicians to abstain from using marijuana while practicing medicine. [More]
Childhood adversities linked to drug or alcohol dependency in adults

Childhood adversities linked to drug or alcohol dependency in adults

Adults who have drug or alcohol dependency have experienced very high rates of early adversities, according to a new study published by University of Toronto researchers. [More]
Studies reveal how parents can help develop smart, social kids

Studies reveal how parents can help develop smart, social kids

A pair of new studies further strengthen scientific understanding of the links between what a child experiences in the first years of life and later childhood behaviour and abilities. [More]
Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

Researchers play crucial role in crafting diagnostic criteria for functional GI disorders

With no laboratory test available to diagnose functional gastrointestinal disorders, proper diagnostic criteria are critical for clinicians to make an accurate determination of what ails their patients. [More]
Lower attention ability in early adolescence linked to increased genetic risk for four different anxiety symptoms

Lower attention ability in early adolescence linked to increased genetic risk for four different anxiety symptoms

University of Texas at Arlington researchers have found that low attention control in early adolescence is related to a genetic risk factor for four different anxiety disorders. Young teens who suffer from anxiety are also more vulnerable to additional problems like depression, drug dependence, suicidal behavior and educational underachievement. [More]
Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

Failure to recognise gender diversity causes major gaps in understanding transgender health

2015 was an unprecedented year in the recognition of transgender rights in some high-income countries. However, as a new Series published in The Lancet today reveals, public recognition has yet to translate to a concerted effort to support and improve the health of transgender people across the world. [More]
Study finds major differences between male and female perpetrators

Study finds major differences between male and female perpetrators

Women who commit deadly violence are different in many ways from male perpetrators, both in terms of the most common victims, the way in which the murder is committed, the place where it is carried out and the perpetrator's background. This is shown by a new study that also investigated homicide trends over time in Sweden. [More]
Shire introduces third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards

Shire introduces third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards

Shire plc today launches the third annual Excellence in ADHD Patient Group Awards celebrating outstanding work by patient advocacy organisations around the world that aim to improve the lives of people with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). [More]
Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Zeiger’s cognitive behavioral therapy program helps school-aged children deal with anxiety issues

Change can be hard for many people. For kids - who often thrive on routine and predictability - the transition from school year to summer and into a new academic year can bring uncertainty that can trigger anxiety and behavioral problems. [More]
Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Study evaluates rate of depression in mothers based on different onset times

Postpartum depression--a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it--is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
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