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UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

UT Arlington researcher receives grant to educate Hispanic patients about depression, treatment options

A University of Texas at Arlington researcher hopes to dispel myths about depression and its treatment, as well as reduce the stigma associated with receiving mental health care among Hispanics. [More]
Researchers uncover easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood

Researchers uncover easily detectable, 'pre-malignant' state in the blood

Researchers from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Harvard Medical School, and Harvard-affiliated hospitals have uncovered an easily detectable, "pre-malignant" state in the blood that significantly increases the likelihood that an individual will go on to develop blood cancers such as leukemia, lymphoma, or myelodysplastic syndrome. [More]
Study shows how mentally ill women in India go through a vicious cycle

Study shows how mentally ill women in India go through a vicious cycle

An award-winning study by a Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine researcher has documented how homeless, mentally ill women in India face a vicious cycle [More]
Taking folic acid supplementation before conception reduces risk of SGA at birth

Taking folic acid supplementation before conception reduces risk of SGA at birth

Taking folic acid before conception significantly reduces the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) at birth, suggests a new study published today (26 November) in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. [More]
TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

TSRI scientists find simple method to convert human skin cells into sensory neurons

A team led by scientists from The Scripps Research Institute has found a simple method to convert human skin cells into the specialized neurons that detect pain, itch, touch and other bodily sensations. These neurons are also affected by spinal cord injury and involved in Friedreich's ataxia, a devastating and currently incurable neurodegenerative disease that largely strikes children. [More]
Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

Study finds that starting ART treatment soon after HIV infection improves immune health

HIV-1-infected U.S. military members and beneficiaries treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) soon after infection were half as likely to develop AIDS and were more likely to reconstitute their immune-fighting CD4+ T-cells to normal levels, researchers reported Nov. 24 in JAMA Internal Medicine. [More]
Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Breast size differences have significant mental health impact in adolescent girls

Differences in breast size have a significant mental health impact in adolescent girls, affecting self-esteem, emotional well-being, and social functioning, reports the December issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. [More]
ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

ADHD information on social media: an interview with Gemma Ryan

It came about through the implementation of another ADHD project called One Stop Shop, which is a collaborative project with Leicestershire Partnership NHS trust (LPT) and ADHD Solutions, a charitable support organization. [More]
Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Phone counseling can help hazardous-drinking smokers quit smoking

Smokers who drink heavily have a tougher time quitting cigarettes than smokers who drink moderately or not at all. However, a multi-center study led by researchers in Yale Cancer Center and Yale School of Medicine found that modifying tobacco-oriented telephone counseling to help hazardous drinkers can help them quit smoking. [More]

Repeat suicide attempts and deaths by suicide drop after talk therapy

Repeat suicide attempts and deaths by suicide were roughly 25 percent lower among a group of Danish people who underwent voluntary short-term psychosocial counseling after a suicide attempt, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health-led research suggests. [More]
Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Actions needed to prevent violence against women and girls

Current efforts to prevent violence against women and girls are inadequate, according to a new Series published in The Lancet. Estimates suggest that globally, 1 in 3 women has experienced either physical or sexual violence from their partner, and that 7% of women will experience sexual assault by a non-partner at some point in their lives. [More]
CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

CHOP recognized as 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia has been recognized as a 2014 LGBT Healthcare Equality Leader by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation, the educational arm of the country's largest lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) civil rights organization. [More]
Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious psychological distress less likely to receive routine cancer screenings

Women with symptoms of serious mental illness are significantly less likely to receive three routine cancer screenings - Pap tests, mammograms and clinical breast exams - than women in the general population, despite being at elevated risk for medical comorbidities and early death, a new study indicates. [More]
Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Mindfulness practices ease depression among pregnant women

Pregnant women with histories of major depression are about 40 percent less likely to relapse into depression if they practice mindfulness techniques--such as meditation, breathing exercises and yoga--along with cognitive therapy, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women

Job authority increases symptoms of depression among women, but decreases them among men, according to a new study from University of Texas at Austin sociologist Tetyana Pudrovska. [More]
One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

One third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight, shows study

Almost one third of male adolescents inaccurately perceive their weight. This can influence their eating habits and, consequently, their health, according to a study led by the UAB and conducted with 600 teenage boys from Barcelona and surrounding areas. [More]
Better behavioral health management can improve health, lower costs

Better behavioral health management can improve health, lower costs

More than a third of hospitalization costs in 13 low-income New Jersey communities are associated with behavioral health conditions, including mental health disorders and substance use, accounting for $880 million in annual inpatient costs, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

Three-drug regimen taken during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission

For HIV-infected women in good immune health, taking a three-drug regimen during pregnancy prevents mother-to-child HIV transmission more effectively than taking one drug during pregnancy, another during labor and two more after giving birth, an international clinical trial has found. [More]

Physical pain and social pain use distinct neural circuits, new study reveals

Over the last decade, neuroscientists have largely come to believe that physical pain and social pain are processed by the brain in the same way. But a new study led by the University of Colorado shows that the two kinds of pain actually use distinct neural circuits, a finding that could lead to more targeted treatments and a better understanding of how the two kinds of pain interact. [More]
Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Poor young people with positive perceptions report better health than people with worse perceptions

Young people growing up in impoverished neighborhoods who perceive their poor communities in a positive light report better health and well-being than those with worse perceptions of where they live, new research led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests. [More]