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Miniature microscope helps neuroscientists identify how the brain links different memories over time

Miniature microscope helps neuroscientists identify how the brain links different memories over time

Using a miniature microscope that opens a window into the brain, UCLA neuroscientists have identified in mice how the brain links different memories over time. While aging weakens these connections, the team devised a way for the middle-aged brain to reconnect separate memories. [More]
Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Study highlights disparities in care for disadvantaged children with traumatic brain injuries

Children who suffer traumatic brain injuries can face a difficult road to recovery, requiring services such as physical therapy and mental health treatment for months or years to get their young lives back on track. [More]
Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Clinical study examines efficacy of new interactive software game to treat pediatric food allergies

Elizabeth McQuaid, Ph.D., a staff psychologist from the Bradley Hasbro Children's Research Center, is leading the Phase II trial of an interactive software game developed to help children with food allergies better manage allergy symptoms, social situations and proper food avoidance. [More]
ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

ULK1, ULK2 enzymes play key role in maintaining cellular homeostasis

Researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital have uncovered how two enzymes, ULK1 and ULK2, which are best known for their role in the degradation and recycling of proteins, control the trafficking of specific proteins. [More]
Health professionals should make parents aware of SIDS risk factors

Health professionals should make parents aware of SIDS risk factors

New research indicates parents want paediatricians to give them detailed information about their child's death. [More]
Friendships, supportive family environments may help protect teens from depression

Friendships, supportive family environments may help protect teens from depression

The importance of friendships and family support in helping prevent depression among teenagers has been highlighted in research from the University of Cambridge. [More]
Experts find vast mental health treatment gap in China and India

Experts find vast mental health treatment gap in China and India

A third of the global burden of disease for mental, neurological and substance use disorders occurs in India and China – more than in all high-income countries combined – yet most people with mental disorders in these countries do not receive needed treatment. [More]
Mouse model of depression can help better understand how ketamine functions

Mouse model of depression can help better understand how ketamine functions

New research demonstrates the effectiveness of ketamine to treat depression in a mouse model of the disease and brings together two hypotheses for the cause of depression. [More]
Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

Taking pregabalin drug during pregnancy could lead to major birth defects

A drug commonly used to treat pain, epilepsy, anxiety and other brain health disorders may be associated with an increased risk of major birth defects, according to a study published in the May 18, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

New research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center shows that mice devoid of PKMzeta, a molecule previously identified by SUNY Downstate scientists as essential to memory formation and storage, recruit a closely related molecule, PKCiota/lambda, to make up for the missing PKMzeta. [More]

Study highlights importance of Medicaid expansion in states with limited coverage

Patients who receive care at migrant health centers located in Medicaid expansion states are increasingly likely to have Medicaid, according to a report published today by the Geiger Gibson/RCHN Community Health Foundation Research Collaborative at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. [More]
Study shows non-Hispanic blacks less likely to receive treatment for schizophrenia

Study shows non-Hispanic blacks less likely to receive treatment for schizophrenia

Non-Hispanic blacks are almost twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, but they're significantly less likely to receive medication for treatment, according to researchers. [More]
UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

UTHealth awarded $1.55 million grant to evaluate, validate assessment tools for grieving children

The New York Life Foundation has awarded a three-year, $1.55 million grant to The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Trauma and Grief Center for Youth to establish the GIFT (Grief-Informed Foundations of Treatment) network, a multi-site practice-research network that will refine, evaluate and validate assessment tools for grieving children to identify the appropriate support or intervention needed. [More]
WHO guidelines on the management of health complications from female genital mutilation

WHO guidelines on the management of health complications from female genital mutilation

Health workers across the world now need to be prepared to provide care to girls and women who have undergone FGM. But, health workers are often unaware of the many negative health consequences of FGM and many remain inadequately trained to recognize and treat them properly. As a result, many women may suffer needlessly from physical and mental health consequences due to FGM. [More]
Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

In a joint project between the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester researchers have examined the initial trial of a smartphone application designed to help people manage their problems. [More]
Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress and depression during pregnancy may activate certain protective mechanisms in babies. Psychologists from the University of Basel together with international colleagues report that certain epigenetic adaptations in newborns suggest this conclusion. [More]
Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

People with depression are significantly less likely to recover well after treatment for colorectal cancer compared to those without depression, according to new research by Macmillan Cancer Support and the University of Southampton. [More]
New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Two statistically significant genetic variants may be linked to increased PTSD risk in veterans

Two statistically significant genetic variants may be linked to increased PTSD risk in veterans

In a massive analysis of DNA samples from more than 13,000 U.S. soldiers, scientists have identified two statistically significant genetic variants that may be associated with an increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an often serious mental illness linked to earlier exposure to a traumatic event, such as combat and an act of violence. [More]
Psychological therapies may help people who self-harm, study finds

Psychological therapies may help people who self-harm, study finds

Latest research out today has found that psychological therapies, more commonly known as ‘talking treatments’, may help people who self- harm. [More]
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