Mental Health News and Research RSS Feed - Mental Health News and Research

SDSU researchers awarded NIH grant to understand how autism plays out across the lifespan

SDSU researchers awarded NIH grant to understand how autism plays out across the lifespan

In the public consciousness, autism spectrum disorder only affects children. In truth, ASD is a lifelong condition. But how it affects older adults is a gaping unknown in autism research. Now, a new and significant grant from the National Institutes of Health will help researchers at San Diego State University understand how the disorder plays out across the lifespan. [More]

Study highlights recent trends in non-fatal suicidal events in the U.S. Army

Although the U.S. Army suicide rate is known to have risen sharply over the past decade, information about medically documented, non-fatal suicidal behaviors is far more limited. According to findings published in Psychiatry: Interpersonal & Biological Processes incidence rates of suicide ideation and suicide attempts increased annually among Soldiers during the years 2004-2009. [More]
Study points to the importance of addressing health-related needs of ex-prisoners

Study points to the importance of addressing health-related needs of ex-prisoners

Ex-prisoners with a history of risky drug use, mental illness or poverty are more likely to end up back behind bars. Those who are obese, are chronically ill or have attempted suicide are more likely to remain in the community. These are some of the findings from an exploratory study into health-related factors that could be used to predict whether a person released from prison will end up in custody again. [More]
Strategy-based cognitive training improves cognitive, psychological health after traumatic brain injury

Strategy-based cognitive training improves cognitive, psychological health after traumatic brain injury

In the first study of its kind, veterans and civilians with traumatic brain injury showed improved cognitive performance and psychological and neural health following strategy-based cognitive training. The Department of Defense-funded study, published this week in Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of cognitive neuroscientists, rehabilitation specialists, and neuroimaging experts from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas. [More]
MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

MIT researchers find neural circuit that appears to cause decision-making in approach-avoidance conflict

Some decisions arouse far more anxiety than others. Among the most anxiety-provoking are those that involve options with both positive and negative elements, such choosing to take a higher-paying job in a city far from family and friends, versus choosing to stay put with less pay. [More]
Impulsive behavior could put you at risk for binge eating

Impulsive behavior could put you at risk for binge eating

Do you get impulsive when you're upset? If so, this could be putting you at risk for binge eating. According to Kelly Klump, professor of psychology at Michigan State University and senior author, the more impulsive you are, the more likely it is you'll binge eat when experiencing negative feelings. [More]
Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

Earlier antiretroviral treatment benefits HIV-infected individuals

A major international randomized clinical trial has found that HIV-infected individuals have a considerably lower risk of developing AIDS or other serious illnesses if they start taking antiretroviral drugs sooner, when their CD4+ T-cell count--a key measure of immune system health--is higher, instead of waiting until the CD4+ cell count drops to lower levels. Together with data from previous studies showing that antiretroviral treatment reduced the risk of HIV transmission to uninfected sexual partners, these findings support offering treatment to everyone with HIV. [More]
Hallucinations, delusions more infrequent in general population

Hallucinations, delusions more infrequent in general population

Hallucinations and delusions in the general population are more common than previously thought. An international study led by The University of Queensland and Harvard Medical School found that hearing voices and seeing things others cannot impacts about five per cent of the general population at some point in their lives. [More]
LegWorks receives grant to produce affordable prosthetic knee for amputees in developing countries

LegWorks receives grant to produce affordable prosthetic knee for amputees in developing countries

Backed with a blend of private and Government of Canada investments catalyzed by Grand Challenges Canada, a new Toronto-based company will contribute to a better life for amputees in developing countries. [More]
Access to mental health care for U.S. teens improving, but not much in local communities with disparities

Access to mental health care for U.S. teens improving, but not much in local communities with disparities

Teens in the U.S. have more availability of mental health care than they did two years ago, according to a new survey from the University of Michigan National Voices Project, but access is not equal in all communities. [More]
Addiction history indicates bipolar conversion risk from precursor disorders

Addiction history indicates bipolar conversion risk from precursor disorders

Substance use and the presence of subthreshold affective symptoms may predict future bipolar disorder in young people with precursor conditions such as depression, research suggests. [More]
Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Researchers use animal models to study how dysfunction of genes contributes to ASD risk

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a neurological condition that affects approximately two percent of people around the world. Although several genes have been linked to multiple concurring conditions of ASD, the process that explains how specific genetic variants lead to behaviors characteristic of the disorder remains elusive. [More]
Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

Six research teams awarded grant to accelerate discovery of new drugs for brain, nervous system disorders

CQDM, Brain Canada and the Ontario Brain Institute award close to $8.5M to six (6) multi-disciplinary and multi-provincial research teams across Canada to address unmet needs in neuroscience within their Focus on Brain strategic initiative. To this amount, $1.5M is added from the various research entities involved as in-kind contributions. [More]
New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments may enable two Canadian organizations to improve life for people with hearing loss

New investments from public and private sources in Canada and the USA, including Grand Challenges Canada and Google.org, will enable two Canadian organizations to contribute to a better life for people with hearing loss in developing countries. [More]

Commuting stress factors can lead to burnout

Commuting length, distance, and means are stress factors that can lead to burnout, says Annie Barreck of the University of Montreal's School of Industrial Relations. "A correlation exists between commuting stress factors and the likelihood of suffering from burnout. [More]
New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New study shows that infections can affect cognitive ability

New research shows that infections can impair your cognitive ability measured on an IQ scale. The study is the largest of its kind to date, and it shows a clear correlation between infection levels and impaired cognition. [More]
Greater evidence-based help needed for depressed workers - New report from The Work Foundation

Greater evidence-based help needed for depressed workers - New report from The Work Foundation

A report from Lancaster University’s Work Foundation recommends that in order to improve both productivity and health and wellbeing among those of working age, more concerted action must be taken to support people with depression to stay in and to return to work... [More]
Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support the contention that athletes are uniquely at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or other neurodegenerative disorders, according to a review in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]

Twitter 'big data' could provide important details about health, social needs of transgender people

Transgender and gender nonconforming people are at high risk for diseases such as AIDS and are vulnerable to depression and other mental health issues, but may be reluctant to disclose their identities to researchers due to stigma. As a result, very little is known about their health and social needs. [More]
Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower cognitive processing speed experience depression, anxiety symptoms as adults

Teens with slower performance on a test of "cognitive processing speed" are more likely to have depression and anxiety symptoms as adults, reports a paper in Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. [More]
Advertisement