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WHO guidelines on the management of health complications from female genital mutilation

WHO guidelines on the management of health complications from female genital mutilation

Health workers across the world now need to be prepared to provide care to girls and women who have undergone FGM. But, health workers are often unaware of the many negative health consequences of FGM and many remain inadequately trained to recognize and treat them properly. As a result, many women may suffer needlessly from physical and mental health consequences due to FGM. [More]
Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

Novel ‘Catch It’ smartphone app can help people manage their problems

In a joint project between the Universities of Liverpool and Manchester researchers have examined the initial trial of a smartphone application designed to help people manage their problems. [More]
Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress, depression during pregnancy may activate protective mechanisms in infants

Maternal stress and depression during pregnancy may activate certain protective mechanisms in babies. Psychologists from the University of Basel together with international colleagues report that certain epigenetic adaptations in newborns suggest this conclusion. [More]
Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

Depressed cancer patients less likely to recover well after treatment

People with depression are significantly less likely to recover well after treatment for colorectal cancer compared to those without depression, according to new research by Macmillan Cancer Support and the University of Southampton. [More]
New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

New Canadian study highlights need to consider mental health of caregivers in post-ICU care

A new Canadian study focusing on caregiver outcomes of critically ill patients reveals that caregivers of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors, who have received mechanical ventilation for a minimum of seven days, are at a high risk of developing clinical depression persisting up to one year after discharge. [More]
Two statistically significant genetic variants may be linked to increased PTSD risk in veterans

Two statistically significant genetic variants may be linked to increased PTSD risk in veterans

In a massive analysis of DNA samples from more than 13,000 U.S. soldiers, scientists have identified two statistically significant genetic variants that may be associated with an increased risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an often serious mental illness linked to earlier exposure to a traumatic event, such as combat and an act of violence. [More]
Psychological therapies may help people who self-harm, study finds

Psychological therapies may help people who self-harm, study finds

Latest research out today has found that psychological therapies, more commonly known as ‘talking treatments’, may help people who self- harm. [More]
Children of depressed parents more likely to have recurrent episodes of depression, poor outcomes in adulthood

Children of depressed parents more likely to have recurrent episodes of depression, poor outcomes in adulthood

The latest report from a 30-year study of families at high- and low-risk for depression reveals that the offspring of depressed parents have a higher risk for depression, morbidity and mortality that persists into middle age. [More]
Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Study suggests ways of minimizing DNA folding errors

Induced pluripotent stem cells hold promise for regenerative medicine because they can, in theory, turn into any type of tissue and because they are made from a patient's own adult cells, guaranteeing compatibility. However, the technique that turns adult cells into these iPS cells is not foolproof; after reverting to their pluripotent state, these cells don't always correctly differentiate back into adult cells. [More]
Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

Lancet study finds unsafe sex as fastest-growing risk factor for ill health in young people

The Lancet Commission's groundbreaking report released today, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," finds that years of neglect and underinvestment have had serious detrimental effects on the health and wellbeing of adolescents aged 10-24 years. [More]
Positive effects of good nutrition linked to child's social behavior, development

Positive effects of good nutrition linked to child's social behavior, development

Proper nutrition during childhood can positively affect a child's social behaviors and development. [More]
Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Mice study reveals signs of stress-related early maturation in vital brain region

Intuition is all one needs to understand that stress in early childhood can create lifelong psychological troubles, but scientists have only begun to explain how those emerge in the brain. [More]
Depression course predicts dementia risk

Depression course predicts dementia risk

Patients with late-life depression have an increased risk of dementia if their symptoms increase over time, whereas a single episode of depression, even if severe, does not carry a significant risk, study findings indicate. [More]
Researchers identify new psychological disorder, maladaptive maydreaming

Researchers identify new psychological disorder, maladaptive maydreaming

A new psychological disorder has been identified in a series of recently published studies - Maladaptive Maydreaming (MD). Researchers from the University of Haifa, in Israel, Fordham University in New York City and University of Lausanne, Switzerland, have found that people with the disorder spend an average of 60% of their waking time in an imaginary world which they themselves have created, realizing that it is a fantasy, and without losing contact with the real world. [More]
Researchers examine role of neural circuit in making decisions

Researchers examine role of neural circuit in making decisions

Choosing what shirt to buy, what to order for lunch or whether to go with the hearty red wine or the lighter white all involve assigning values to the options. A small brain structure plays a central role in the many decisions like this we make each day. But it hasn't been clear how a limited number of neurons in this small part of the brain can support an unlimited number of choices. [More]
New research on epigenetics of lactose intolerance unravels understanding of schizophrenia

New research on epigenetics of lactose intolerance unravels understanding of schizophrenia

A new study on the epigenetics of lactose intolerance may provide an approach to understanding schizophrenia and other complex, serious illnesses [More]
Genetic biomarkers may predict response to psychological treatments in anxious children

Genetic biomarkers may predict response to psychological treatments in anxious children

An investigation published in the current issue of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics indicates that genetic biomarkers may predict response to psychotherapy in anxious children. [More]
Digital health: putting patients at the center. An interview with Roz Davies

Digital health: putting patients at the center. An interview with Roz Davies

In England alone the NHS sees 1 million patients every 36 hours and there are 3 million volunteers across health and social care many of whom are motivated by their personal experience of healthcare services. [More]
Study shows lunar phases do not influence people's behavior

Study shows lunar phases do not influence people's behavior

Always surrounded by an aura of mystery, the moon and its possible influence over human behavior has been object of ancestral fascination and mythical speculation for centuries. While the full moon cannot turn people into werewolves, some people do accuse it of causing a bad night's sleep or creating physical and mental alterations. But is there any science behind these myths? [More]
Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

Cancer may have negative impact on health of individuals as they age

A new study indicates that cancer may have negative impacts on both the physical and mental health of individuals as they age. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that cancer increases the risk for certain health issues above and beyond normal aging. This is likely due, in part, to decreased physical activity and stress associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment. [More]
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