Mental Health News and Research RSS Feed - Mental Health News and Research

South Dakota researchers aim to improve tobacco-free policies in health-care facilities

South Dakota researchers aim to improve tobacco-free policies in health-care facilities

Health-care facilities being tobacco-free seems like a natural fit, but it's far more complicated than it might seem. [More]
Study shows Americans live longer, but in poor health

Study shows Americans live longer, but in poor health

Americans are living longer but in poorer health, according to a new study. The USC-led study examined life expectancy trends and disability rates in a 40-year period, from 1970 to 2010. The analysis of U.S. vital statistics found that the average total lifespan increased for men and women in those 40 years, but so did the proportion of time spent living with a disability. [More]
Experts launch mhNOW initiative to bring proven mental health solutions to people most in need

Experts launch mhNOW initiative to bring proven mental health solutions to people most in need

Today, the Mental Health Now, or mhNOW, initiative will launch at the inaugural Financing and Innovation in Global Health (FIGH) conference. Led by mental health experts Chris Underhill, founder and president of BasicNeeds, and Moitreyee Sinha, head of health at the Global Development Incubator (GDI), mhNOW is a global, collective action including social entrepreneurs, organizations and companies that are working together to innovate and identify mental health solutions on a global scale, and systemically implement in communities at a local level. [More]

California’s effort to reduce stigma of mental health issues provides positive economic benefits

California's investment in a social marketing campaign to reduce stigma and discrimination associated with mental illness may provide the state with positive economic benefits by increasing employment and worker productivity, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
Coronary heart disease, cancer less likely among people with learning disabilities

Coronary heart disease, cancer less likely among people with learning disabilities

Coronary heart disease and cancer rates among people with learning disabilities are nearly a third lower than the general population, says new research. [More]
PTSD patients carry long-term burden even with early clinical interventions

PTSD patients carry long-term burden even with early clinical interventions

The majority of people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) recover after early treatment -- but a substantial number still suffer for years after a traumatic event even with early clinical interventions, according to a study publishing online April 12, 2016 in The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. [More]
Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression combined with behavioral, metabolic symptoms increases risk of type 2 diabetes

Depression may compound the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in people with such early warning signs of metabolic disease as obesity, high blood pressure and unhealthy cholesterol levels, according to researchers from McGill University, l'Université de Montréal, the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal and the University of Calgary. [More]
Research looks at effects of traumatic childbirth on midwives and obstetricians

Research looks at effects of traumatic childbirth on midwives and obstetricians

When complications arise in the delivery room that lead to traumatic childbirth, clinicians providing care may feel upset and experience secondary traumatic stress. [More]
Researchers link alcohol, cocaine misuse with future suicide attempt

Researchers link alcohol, cocaine misuse with future suicide attempt

In a general sense, medical studies support the popular intuition -- a staple of movies and literature -- that suicidal behavior and substance misuse are linked. But the relationship between the two is not so simple. A new study of hundreds of suicidal emergency department (ED) patients from around the U.S. found that the significance of the link varied with age, gender and race. Across the board, however, the use of cocaine and alcohol together was a red flag. [More]
Traumatic childbirth may impact healthcare professionals' mental health

Traumatic childbirth may impact healthcare professionals' mental health

When complications arise in the delivery room that lead to traumatic childbirth, clinicians providing care may feel upset and experience secondary traumatic stress. A new study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology, found that feelings of blame and guilt dominate when midwives and obstetricians struggle to cope with the aftermath of a traumatic childbirth, but such events also made them think more about the meaning of life and helped them become better midwives and doctors. [More]
Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

Long-term medication use reduces risk of relapse and improves symptoms in BDD patients

People with Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) fare better and are less likely to relapse when treated with medication on a long-term basis, according to researchers at Rhode Island Hospital and Massachusetts General Hospital. [More]
Physical, mental training may improve health of young schizophrenia patients

Physical, mental training may improve health of young schizophrenia patients

In as little as a few months, antipsychotic medications can tame the delusions and hallucinations that characterize schizophrenia. But the medications do little to reverse the less familiar brain-based problems that accompany the illness. [More]
WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day. [More]
Study shows overall drop in ER visits among patients served by prescription assistance program

Study shows overall drop in ER visits among patients served by prescription assistance program

A graduate student at Washington State University Spokane is the lead author on a research paper that shows an overall drop in emergency room visits and hospitalizations by patients who are served by the Spokane Prescription Assistance Network, which helps low income people get free and reduced-price medications. [More]
Sleep extension may improve academic performance among elementary school-age children

Sleep extension may improve academic performance among elementary school-age children

Elementary school-age children who improved their sleep habits also improved in their academic performance, according to a study by researchers at McGill University and the Douglas Mental Health University Institute in partnership with the Riverside School Board in Montreal. [More]
Researchers identify blood-based biomarkers to accurately predict suicidal ideation in women

Researchers identify blood-based biomarkers to accurately predict suicidal ideation in women

Researchers have identified blood-based biomarkers and developed questionnaire-based apps that may help clinicians identify which of their female patients being treated for psychiatric disorders are at greatest risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. [More]
Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in U.S. unchanged, finds new CDC report

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) largely unchanged from two years ago, at one in 68 children (or 1.46 percent). [More]
Remotely tracking patients' eye gaze could help identify children with ASD

Remotely tracking patients' eye gaze could help identify children with ASD

A study to be published in the April 2016 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry reports that eye tracking can differentiate children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) from children without ASD but with other developmental problems (non-ASD). [More]
Psychedelic compounds could treat patients with mental health issues

Psychedelic compounds could treat patients with mental health issues

Psychedelic compounds have had a colorful past. Although initially investigated for medical uses, they were banned after cultural and political times changed in the 1960s and 1970s. Now, the compounds are getting another chance in the mainstream, according to the cover story of Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. [More]

Highly distressed adolescents more likely to be unemployed in early adulthood

Suffering from emotional problems in adolescence is an important risk factor for future joblessness, irrespective of socio-economic background, according to a new report by academics at the University of Stirling. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement