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Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Patients with type 2 diabetes have a dysfunctional sugar metabolism because the essential hormone insulin does not work effectively. Once the disease reaches an advanced stage, the body stops producing insulin altogether, which means that it has to be administered externally. [More]
Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. [More]
BooknHeal developing application to help people with mental health issues find the right psychotherapist

BooknHeal developing application to help people with mental health issues find the right psychotherapist

BooknHeal is a web service for appointment scheduling aiming to connect psychotherapists with people looking for help for mental health issues. [More]
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
Elsevier's DirectCourse education programs certified by IACET

Elsevier's DirectCourse education programs certified by IACET

The International Association for Continuing Education and Training has awarded accreditation status to Elsevier's DirectCourse, which provides online learning designed to train the direct service workforce that supports persons with disabilities by helping them remain in home and community settings and assisting them to be employed. [More]
Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Children are more likely to have a repeat, delayed anaphylactic reaction from the same allergic cause, depending on the severity of the initial reaction. The first pediatric study to look at the predictors for this phenomenon was published today in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [More]
Study explores effects of household smoking on children's later weight gain

Study explores effects of household smoking on children's later weight gain

Children whose parents smoked when they were toddlers are likely to have a wider waist and a higher BMI by time they reach ten years of age, reveal researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte Justine Research Centre. "We suspect the statistics we've established linking childhood obesity to exposure to parents' smoking may underestimate the effect due to parents under reporting the amount they smoked out of shame," explained Professor Linda Pagani, who led the study. [More]
Professor Tiago H. Falk receives CMBES Early Career Achievement Award

Professor Tiago H. Falk receives CMBES Early Career Achievement Award

Professor Tiago H. Falk of the INRS Énergie Matériaux Télécommunications Research Centre has received the Canadian Medical and Biological Engineering Society (CMBES) Early Career Achievement Award in recognition of the outstanding scientific contributions the young researcher has made over the past five years. [More]
Singapore's first large-scale pre-pregnancy study launched

Singapore's first large-scale pre-pregnancy study launched

KK Women's and Children's Hospital, Singapore Institute for Clinical Science of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research, the National University of Singapore and the National University Health System have launched Singapore's first large-scale pre-conception study which will involve 1,000 local couples. [More]

Zen Medical to showcase ZenCharts EHR system at Innovations in Behavioral Healthcare conference

Zen Medical, LLC., a division of Sanomedics, Inc. announced today that it will be exhibiting at booth # 8 at Innovations in Behavioral Healthcare in Nashville, Tennessee, June 22-23 at the Hilton Downtown Nashville. [More]
UCSF researchers find that people divided on cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption

UCSF researchers find that people divided on cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption

In one of the first published studies using data from the Health eHeart Study, UCSF researchers have found that people are divided on the cardiovascular benefits of alcohol consumption. And, those who do perceive alcohol as "heart healthy" drink substantially more than their counterparts. [More]
Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women with significant depressive symptoms have lower levels of klotho hormone

Women under chronic stress have significantly lower levels of klotho, a hormone that regulates aging and enhances cognition, researchers at UC San Francisco have found in a study comparing mothers of children on the autism spectrum to low-stress controls. [More]
Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

Study examines mental health prognosis of young VTE patients

EuroHeartCare is the official annual meeting of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. The 2015 meeting is held 14 to 15 June in Dubrovnik, Croatia, in collaboration with the Croatian Association of Cardiology Nurses. [More]

Study can help VHA to target suicide prevention efforts for high-risk patients

Clinicians are challenged every day to make difficult decisions regarding patients' suicide risk. Using Veterans Health Administration health system electronic medical record data, Veterans Affairs and National Institute of Mental Health scientists were able to identify very small groups of individuals within the VHA's patient population with very high, predicted suicide risk -- most of whom had not been identified for suicide risk by clinicians. [More]
Person-centered approach to physical therapy has positive effect on depression

Person-centered approach to physical therapy has positive effect on depression

Exercise has a positive effect on depression - so reveals a dissertation written at the Sahlgrenska Academy. In at study at the Sahlgrenska Academy, the researcher evaluated exercise as add-on therapy to medicating with antidepressants. The study divided 62 individuals with diagnosed clinical depression into three groups, in which two participated in two different types of exercise with a physiotherapist twice a week for 10 weeks while the third, the control group, did not participate in systematic exercise. [More]
ADHD drug improves cognitive decline in menopausal women

ADHD drug improves cognitive decline in menopausal women

According to a new study, women experiencing difficulty with time management, attention, organization, memory, and problem solving - often referred to as executive functions - related to menopause may find improvement with a drug already being used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Sleep problems and energy products may contribute to risk of alcohol use in teens

Sleep problems and energy products may contribute to risk of alcohol use in teens

A new study suggest sleep problems and energy product use are associated with increased alcohol use in teens, even after controlling for sociodemographics and mental health. [More]
Autistic children who are sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently

Autistic children who are sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently

Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, a team of UCLA researchers has shown for the first time that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who are overly sensitive to sensory stimuli have brains that react differently than those with the disorder who don't respond so severely to noises, visual stimulation and physical contact. [More]
US physicians with waivers increase potential access to effective medication-assisted treatment

US physicians with waivers increase potential access to effective medication-assisted treatment

American physicians with waivers allowing them to provide office-based medication-assisted buprenorphine treatment to patients addicted to opioids were able to increase potential access to effective medication-assisted treatment by 74 percent from 2002 to 2011, according to a new RAND Corporation study. [More]
New research suggests pedophiles more likely to have facial anomalies

New research suggests pedophiles more likely to have facial anomalies

New research suggests pedophiles are more likely to have superficial facial flaws, known as Minor Physical Anomalies (MPAs). They are also more likely to be left-handed, says Fiona Dyshniku of the University of Windsor in Canada. She led an investigation into the prevalence and distribution of physical anomalies among men who are sent for sexological assessment. [More]
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