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New big data collaboration aims to improve care management for diabetes, mental health

New big data collaboration aims to improve care management for diabetes, mental health

Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore and Holmusk, a global tele-health platform, have recently announced a collaboration to further the potential of big data in healthcare. Big data refers to very large, unstructured and diverse datasets that cannot be managed using conventional methods. In healthcare, big data and analytics allow us to discover patterns that would not be found otherwise, and make predictions about disease. This has the potential to improve care and lower costs. [More]
Moderate and severe selective eating habits linked to depression, anxiety, shows study

Moderate and severe selective eating habits linked to depression, anxiety, shows study

Picky eating among children is a common but burdensome problem that can result in poor nutrition for kids, family conflict, and frustrated parents. [More]
Lancet Series examines enduring radiological, psychological impact of nuclear disasters

Lancet Series examines enduring radiological, psychological impact of nuclear disasters

On the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombs in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a three-part Series published in The Lancet looks at the enduring radiological and psychological impact of nuclear disasters, including the most recent accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan in 2011. [More]
Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Psychotropic medication use widespread among older adults, new study finds

Older Americans receive prescriptions for mental health medications at more than twice the rate that younger adults do, a new study finds. [More]
Study reveals lingering effects of Superstorm Sandy among New Jersey residents

Study reveals lingering effects of Superstorm Sandy among New Jersey residents

Superstorm Sandy continues to affect the lives of tens of thousands of New Jersey residents, in the form of unfinished repairs, disputed claims, and recurrent mold. These after-effects still linger for Sandy-impacted residents, and are associated with increased odds of residents experiencing mental health distress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and depression. [More]
Despite weight-loss surgery, one in five adolescents still suffers from depression

Despite weight-loss surgery, one in five adolescents still suffers from depression

Teenagers suffering from severe obesity generally feel worse than their peers, but after undergoing gastric bypass nearly all experience improved mental health. [More]
Articles explore mechanisms of repetitive thinking that contributes to mental health, illness

Articles explore mechanisms of repetitive thinking that contributes to mental health, illness

The ability to engage in mental time travel -- to delve back into past events or imagine future outcomes -- is a unique and central part of the human experience. And yet this very ability can have detrimental consequences for both physical and mental well-being when it becomes repetitive and uncontrolled. [More]

People with IBD experience higher anxiety risk compared to peers without IBD

People who have inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, have twice the odds of having a generalized anxiety disorder at some point in their lives when compared to peers without IBD, according to a new study published by University of Toronto researchers. [More]
Mice without specific brain chemical develop characteristics similar to bipolar disorder, shows study

Mice without specific brain chemical develop characteristics similar to bipolar disorder, shows study

Mice that have a particular brain chemical switched off become hyperactive and sleep for just 65 per cent of their normal time. [More]
New Norwegian study finds strong relationship between sleep problems and self-harm in adolescents

New Norwegian study finds strong relationship between sleep problems and self-harm in adolescents

There is a strong relationship between sleep problems such as insomnia, and self-harm, according to findings in a new Norwegian study. [More]
New WFSJ initiative to help journalists report on staggering toll of HCV

New WFSJ initiative to help journalists report on staggering toll of HCV

The World Federation of Science Journalists is launching a new initiative to help journalists report on the staggering toll of Hepatitis C (HCV) as well as the scientific and political barriers to treating the disease. [More]
Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Study suggests potential way to predict autism or psychosis risk in children with genetic abnormality

Doctors and researchers have long known that children who are missing about 60 genes on a certain chromosome are at a significantly elevated risk for developing either a disorder on the autism spectrum or psychosis — that is, any mental disorder characterized by delusions and hallucinations, including schizophrenia. But there has been no way to predict which child with the abnormality might be at risk for which disorder. [More]
Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Iron supplementation may increase risk of neurodegeneration, shows research

Is it possible that too much iron in infant formula may potentially increase risk for neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's in adulthood -- and are teeth the window into the past that can help us tell? T [More]
Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

Wayne State's faculty selected for Aspen Health Innovators Fellowship

The Washington, D.C.-based educational and policy studies organization The Aspen Institute has selected Wayne State University School of Medicine's Patrick Hines, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of Physiology and an assistant professor of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, one of only 20 health care leaders in the country for the inaugural class of its Health Innovators Fellowship. [More]
Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Reduced pain, disability predict satisfaction after spine surgery

Patient satisfaction ratings after surgery for spinal degenerative disease—especially in terms of reduced pain and disability—are a good indicator of the procedure's effectiveness, reports a study in the August issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
Diagnosing psychiatric disorder may not be as important as prescribing effective treatment

Diagnosing psychiatric disorder may not be as important as prescribing effective treatment

Nailing the diagnosis of a psychiatric disorder may not be important in prescribing effective treatment, according to Mark Zimmerman, M.D., a clinical researcher at Rhode Island Hospital. His opinion editorial was published online today in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry. [More]
Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

Adults born very premature display socially withdrawn personality

New research indicates that adults born very premature are more likely to be socially withdrawn and display signs of autism. [More]
Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Breakthrough reveals influence of schizophrenia’s 'Rosetta Stone' gene in brain development

Scientists have identified a critical function of what they believe to be schizophrenia's "Rosetta Stone" gene that could hold the key to decoding the function of all genes involved in the disease. [More]
Men more likely to suffer from cannabis psychosis compared to women

Men more likely to suffer from cannabis psychosis compared to women

New research by health scientists at the University of York has revealed that a greater proportion of men than women suffer from cannabis psychosis. [More]
Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Less invasive endovascular aortic repair benefits most patients, provides quick recovery

Each year, nearly 40,000 Americans undergo elective surgery to repair an abdominal aortic aneurysm with the goal of preventing a life-threatening rupture of this potentially dangerous cardiovascular condition. [More]
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