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Majority of men who use violence against female partner struggle with serious mental health issues

Majority of men who use violence against female partner struggle with serious mental health issues

The majority of men who use violence towards their partner struggle with serious mental health issues. We need to look at more than just the power relations between the sexes in order to understand and prevent domestic violence, says researcher. [More]
Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

Researchers complete participants’ enrollment in Phase III trial of vaginal ring for HIV prevention

In a first for HIV prevention, an international team of researchers have completed follow-up of participants enrolled in a pivotal Phase III trial that tested the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring for preventing HIV in women. [More]
New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

New report finds variability in wait times for health care appointments throughout U.S.

Tremendous variability in wait times for health care appointments exists throughout the U.S., ranging from same day service to several months, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. However, there is currently an opportunity to develop "systems-based approaches" -- similar to systems-based engineering approaches applied successfully in industries beyond health care -- that aim to provide immediate engagement of a patient's concern at the point of initial contact and can be used in in-person appointments as well as alternatives such as team-based care, electronic or telephone consultations, telehealth, and surge capacity agreements with other caregivers and facilities. [More]
New research reveals that male and female mice use different cells to process pain

New research reveals that male and female mice use different cells to process pain

New research released today in Nature Neuroscience reveals for the first time that pain is processed in male and female mice using different cells. These findings have far-reaching implications for our basic understanding of pain, how we develop the next generation of medications for chronic pain—which is by far the most prevalent human health condition—and the way we execute basic biomedical research using mice. [More]
Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

Specialized mental health treatment can benefit children from poor nations

A specific type of talk therapy dispensed in the developing world to orphans and other vulnerable children who experienced trauma such as sexual and domestic abuse showed dramatic results, despite being administered by workers with little education, new research shows. [More]
People with specific gene variant at greater risk of developing depressions

People with specific gene variant at greater risk of developing depressions

People born with a particular gene variant have a greater risk of developing depressions, a recent study from the Department of Psychology at The University of Oslo shows. [More]
Mental Health Advisory Committee to hold hearings on two bills to enhance care for patients suffering from acute mental illness

Mental Health Advisory Committee to hold hearings on two bills to enhance care for patients suffering from acute mental illness

Behavioral health care advocates and nurses will testify Monday on two critically important bills designed to improve care for residents of Massachusetts suffering from acute mental illness who are currently going without proper care while being boarded in overcrowded hospital emergency departments or being inappropriately housed in our corrections system. [More]
ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

ProfNet network experts available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area

Below are experts from the ProfNet network that are available to discuss timely issues in your coverage area. You can also submit a query to the hundreds of thousands of experts in our network – it's easy and free! [More]
University of Leicester collaborates with Youth Sport Trust to make adolescent girls stay active

University of Leicester collaborates with Youth Sport Trust to make adolescent girls stay active

Researchers from the University of Leicester are working with the Youth Sport Trust to determine whether a school-based physical activity programme could help provide the key to encouraging adolescent girls to be active and stay active. [More]
Unique program enhances sense of purpose and meaning in life for seniors living independently

Unique program enhances sense of purpose and meaning in life for seniors living independently

A unique program combining a life review writing workshop with conversations between seniors and college students enhances the sense of meaning in life for older adults living independently, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. [More]
New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

New UCLA study may lead to more precise treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder

Tens of millions of Americans -- an estimated 1 to 2 percent of the population -- will suffer at some point in their lifetimes from obsessive-compulsive disorder, a disorder characterized by recurrent, intrusive, and disturbing thoughts (obsessions), and/or stereotyped recurrent behaviors (compulsions). [More]
Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease, mental health issues affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics

Chronic disease and mental health issues disproportionately affect low-income African-Americans, Latinos and Hispanics, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two new studies by the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma and Mental Health Disparities shed light on the causes and impacts of this disparity. [More]
Long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication benefits people with schizophrenia

Long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication benefits people with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization. Left untreated, the disease can cause a significant loss in quality of life, including unemployment and estrangement from loved ones. But many people with schizophrenia can control the disorder and live without symptoms for several years if they consistently take prescribed antipsychotic medication, typically a daily pill. [More]

Violent video games do not contribute to aggressive behavior, show studies

In the wake of the tragic shooting in a Charleston, S.C., church, many look for reasons to explain such violent behavior. Some already have pointed to violent video games as a possible reason, but three new studies from Stetson University found no evidence violent video games contribute to aggressive behavior, violent behavior or hostility in teens. [More]
Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Pioglitazone drug significantly decreases risk of dementia

Patients with type 2 diabetes have a dysfunctional sugar metabolism because the essential hormone insulin does not work effectively. Once the disease reaches an advanced stage, the body stops producing insulin altogether, which means that it has to be administered externally. [More]
Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during pregnancy affects babies' brain development

Stress during the first trimester of pregnancy alters the population of microbes living in a mother's vagina. Those changes are passed on to newborns during birth and are associated with differences in their gut microbiome as well as their brain development, according to a new study by University of Pennsylvania researchers. [More]
BooknHeal developing application to help people with mental health issues find the right psychotherapist

BooknHeal developing application to help people with mental health issues find the right psychotherapist

BooknHeal is a web service for appointment scheduling aiming to connect psychotherapists with people looking for help for mental health issues. [More]
Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty can help reduce debilitating sickle cell disease, save significant money for NHS

Tackling fuel poverty in the homes of people with sickle cell disease could reduce debilitating attacks and save significant money for the NHS, according to a study by Sheffield Hallam University funded by the Chesshire Lehmann Fund. [More]
Elsevier's DirectCourse education programs certified by IACET

Elsevier's DirectCourse education programs certified by IACET

The International Association for Continuing Education and Training has awarded accreditation status to Elsevier's DirectCourse, which provides online learning designed to train the direct service workforce that supports persons with disabilities by helping them remain in home and community settings and assisting them to be employed. [More]
Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Pediatric study looks at evidence-based predictors of biphasic allergic reactions

Children are more likely to have a repeat, delayed anaphylactic reaction from the same allergic cause, depending on the severity of the initial reaction. The first pediatric study to look at the predictors for this phenomenon was published today in Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. [More]
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