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First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

First trial of Cognition Kit wearables demonstrates effectiveness in measuring mental health

The neuroscience company Cambridge Cognition Holdings PLC, which develops near patient technologies for the assessment of brain health, has announced results from a new technology feasibility study. The results demonstrate for the first time that consumer grade wearables such as the Apple Watch® and Microsoft Band can be used to accurately measure clinically relevant cognitive performance in everyday life using the Company’s new Cognition Kit software. [More]
Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

Study suggests structural changes in the brain help cope with stressful situations

People who experience job loss, divorce, death of a loved one or any number of life's upheavals often adopt coping mechanisms to make the situation less traumatic. [More]
Researchers find better mental health in older age despite more physical ailments

Researchers find better mental health in older age despite more physical ailments

While even the best wines eventually peak and turn to vinegar, a new study by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine suggests a paradoxical trend in the mental health of aging adults: They seem to consistently get better over time. [More]
Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Study explores how parental use of religious coping strategies in NICU affects family's interactions

Understanding how parents cope while their child is in the neonatal intensive care unit could lead to better support for the family and a more successful transition to home when the baby is healthy, according to Penn State College of Medicine and Penn State Harrisburg researchers. [More]
People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

People with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, study reveals

A large international study of more than 200,000 people in nearly 50 countries has revealed that people with psychosis engage in low levels of physical activity, and men with psychosis are over two times more likely to miss global activity targets compared to people without the illness. [More]
Childhood brain injury increases chances of mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death

Childhood brain injury increases chances of mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death

Childhood brain injuries, including concussions, are associated with an increased risk of subsequent mental illness, poor school attainment and premature death, according to a study published today in PLOS Medicine. [More]
Night time sleep problems increase risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts

Night time sleep problems increase risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts

The link between sleep problems and suicidal thoughts and behaviours is made starkly clear in new research from The University of Manchester, published in the BMJ Open. [More]
Job satisfaction can impact overall health in people in their early 40s

Job satisfaction can impact overall health in people in their early 40s

Job satisfaction in your late 20s and 30s has a link to overall health in your early 40s, according to a new nationwide study. [More]
Swimming can be effective option for treating patients with fibromyalgia pain

Swimming can be effective option for treating patients with fibromyalgia pain

A study performed by researchers at the Federal University of São Paulo shows swimming is as effective as walking to relieve pain and improve quality of life for patients with fibromyalgia. [More]
Early-life infections may be risk factor for developmental disorders later in life

Early-life infections may be risk factor for developmental disorders later in life

The Zika virus now active in numerous countries, and the severe birth defects associated with it, makes it clear that infection in pregnant women can have immediate and devastating effects on the developing baby. [More]
Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

Poor prenatal nutrition may be linked to ADHD symptoms and conduct problems in children

New research led by scientists from King's College London and the University of Bristol has found that a high-fat, high-sugar diet during pregnancy may be linked to symptoms of ADHD in children who show conduct problems early in life. [More]
Study examines mental illness severity among Asian populations living in western country

Study examines mental illness severity among Asian populations living in western country

Chinese and South Asian patients in Ontario experience more severe mental illness at the time of hospital admission than other patients, according to a new study that examined the association between illness severity and ethnicity. [More]
Study shows work productivity key in evaluating recovery of depressed patients

Study shows work productivity key in evaluating recovery of depressed patients

While medications can quickly reduce depressive symptoms, monitoring work productivity can provide unique insight into whether a patient will require additional treatments to achieve long-term remission, a new study through the Peter O'Donnell Jr. Brain Institute finds. [More]
Mindfulness training helps alleviate depressive symptoms in disadvantaged African-American women

Mindfulness training helps alleviate depressive symptoms in disadvantaged African-American women

African-American women with lower socio-economic status have an increased risk of depressive disorders, yet they rarely seek out antidepressants or psychotherapy because of negative attitudes and stigma associated with conventional mental health treatments. [More]
Study finds disparities in mental health care for minority children and young adults

Study finds disparities in mental health care for minority children and young adults

Black children and young adults are about half as likely as their white counterparts to get mental health care despite having similar rates of mental health problems, according to a study published today [Friday, Aug. 12] in the International Journal of Health Services. [More]
Aerobic exercise can improve brain functioning in schizophrenia patients

Aerobic exercise can improve brain functioning in schizophrenia patients

Aerobic exercise can significantly help people coping with the long-term mental health condition schizophrenia, according to a new study from University of Manchester researchers. [More]
Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery. [More]
Scientists activate neurons in the mouse brain by injecting virus containing light-sensitive proteins

Scientists activate neurons in the mouse brain by injecting virus containing light-sensitive proteins

Neurons that fire together really do wire together, says a new study in Science, suggesting that the three-pound computer in our heads may be more malleable than we think. [More]

Intervention Drug Rehab Association provides dual diagnosis programs to increase recovery rates

Addiction and mental illness are closely related. According to the 2012 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 8.4 million American adults have a mental illness as well as an addiction. [More]
CPS caseworkers may need to use more holistic approach to improve response to chronic neglect

CPS caseworkers may need to use more holistic approach to improve response to chronic neglect

A new study by researchers at the University at Buffalo suggests that Child Protective Services caseworkers may need to use a more all-encompassing approach to improve how they respond to cases of chronic neglect. [More]
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