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Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

Secrets of success for pioneering research revealed

The British Pharmacological Society has announced the secrets of success for pioneering research along with the outcome of its annual 'Putting UK Pharmacology on the Map' vote. The vote selects sites of special scientific interest linked to achievements in pharmacology based on a ballot of MPs, peers and senior members of the scientific community. [More]
Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Loyola neurologist finds little scientific evidence that brain games improve cognitive function

Computerized brain games that are advertised as a way to help boost intelligence and prevent dementia will be popular Christmas gifts this year. [More]

Study finds almost half of patients withhold sensitive information in electronic medical records

In the first real-world trial of the impact of patient-controlled access to electronic medical records, almost half of the patients who participated withheld clinically sensitive information in their medical records from some or all of their health care providers. [More]
Health promotion program reduces cardiovascular risk in obese people with serious mental illness

Health promotion program reduces cardiovascular risk in obese people with serious mental illness

A health promotion program, called In SHAPE, specifically designed for people with serious mental illness, produced more fit participants and significant weight loss than a control group where participants only received a gym membership. [More]

Women more noticeably affected by negative events in their partner’s life

Women may long have suspected it to be the case, but large-scale research by Griffith University and the University of Queensland has found women are more empathetic toward their partners than men. [More]
New intervention combines social media with behavioral psychology to encourage more HIV testing

New intervention combines social media with behavioral psychology to encourage more HIV testing

Social media such as Twitter and Facebook can be valuable in the fight against HIV in the United States, where research has demonstrated they can prompt high-risk populations to request at-home testing kits for the virus that causes AIDS, suggesting a way to potentially boost testing rates. [More]
Landmark GRACE study helps shape the practice of geriatric medicine

Landmark GRACE study helps shape the practice of geriatric medicine

The seminal 2007 GRACE study from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research and the Regenstrief Institute has been identified as one of 27 studies conducted over the past quarter century that have helped shape the practice of geriatric medicine. The GRACE study involved community-dwelling seniors and their primary-care physicians in a team approach to optimize health and decrease cost of care. [More]
ADHD, conduct disorder in young adolescents linked to increased alcohol and tobacco use

ADHD, conduct disorder in young adolescents linked to increased alcohol and tobacco use

A new study links ADHD and conduct disorder in young adolescents with increased alcohol and tobacco use. The Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center study is among the first to assess such an association in this age group. [More]
EMAHSN seeks innovative projects focusing on cancer diagnosis and treatment

EMAHSN seeks innovative projects focusing on cancer diagnosis and treatment

A ‘call to action’ has been issued to seek innovative solutions to one of the East Midlands’ biggest healthcare challenges - cancer - which every year affects 23,000 people across the region. [More]
Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Revolutionising back pain treatments: an interview with Dr Kieran O’Sullivan

Back pain is exceptionally common. In fact, to not experience back pain at some point of your life would be thoroughly abnormal. Experiencing back pain is like becoming tired or becoming sad; we don’t necessarily like it, but it’s perfectly common. [More]

Study: Training older people in social media improves mental health and well-being

Training older people in the use of social media improves cognitive capacity, increases a sense of self-competence and could have a beneficial overall impact on mental health and well-being, according to a landmark study carried out in the UK. [More]
Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

Cold 'sensor' hold key to new therapeutic target for treatment of frostbite and hypothermia

A cold 'sensor' which triggers the skin's vascular response to the cold could represent an exciting new therapeutic target for the treatment of frostbite and hypothermia, according to scientists at King's College London. [More]
Psychotic experiences show shared genetic liability

Psychotic experiences show shared genetic liability

Study findings provide support for psychotic experiences being an early marker of increased risk of psychosis transition and an important intermediary phenotype in transdiagnostic research on psychosis. [More]
Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Researchers find that one in six Ontario adults reports a history of TBI

Nearly seventeen per cent of adults surveyed in Ontario said they have suffered a traumatic brain injury that left them unconscious for five minutes or required them to be hospitalized overnight, according to new research. These same adults also reported more substance use, smoking and recent psychiatric distress. [More]
Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

Research links increase in sudden cardiovascular death with consumption of cocaine

A joint piece of research conducted by the UPV/EHU, the Basque Institute of Forensic Medicine, and the Biomedical Research Centre Network into Mental Health of the Carlos III Institute of Health links, for the first time, the increase in sudden cardiovascular death with the recent consumption of cocaine. In people in the 19-49 age bracket this risk is quadrupled. [More]

New case study assesses immediate, ongoing response to the 9/11 disaster

Fourteen years after the attack on the World Trade Center (WTC), a case study in the current issue of Annals of Global Health identifies several elements that have had a critical impact on the evolution of the WTC response and, directly or indirectly, on the health of the WTC-exposed population. [More]
New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

New technique allows rapid, large-scale studies of gene function

Using a gene-editing system originally developed to delete specific genes, MIT researchers have now shown that they can reliably turn on any gene of their choosing in living cells. [More]
UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

Children who are having difficulty processing trauma or loss can now turn to the Trauma and Grief Center for Youth at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Cancer Council urges partners of men diagnosed with prostate cancer to reach out for support

Cancer Council urges partners of men diagnosed with prostate cancer to reach out for support

Cancer Council is calling on partners of men with prostate cancer to reach out for support, with research showing partners experience high levels of distress related to the diagnosis of their loved one. [More]
Novel drug target could lead to better antipsychotic medications

Novel drug target could lead to better antipsychotic medications

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have identified a novel drug target that could lead to the development of better antipsychotic medications. [More]