Metabolic Syndrome News and Research RSS Feed - Metabolic Syndrome News and Research

Metabolic syndrome is a clustering of abnormalities that includes obesity, hyperglycemia, high blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia. Advances in scientific knowledge, the increasing prevalence of obesity, and the disorder's role in contributing to cardiovascular disease and diabetes are fueling interest in metabolic syndrome.
Regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels

Regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels

Research published in the journal Nutrition and Metabolic Insights found that regular consumption of mango by obese adults may lower blood sugar levels and does not negatively impact body weight. [More]
Metabolic syndrome has inverse link with LUTS in Korean men

Metabolic syndrome has inverse link with LUTS in Korean men

The metabolic syndrome may be protective against lower urinary-tract symptoms, a study of Korean middle-aged men has found. [More]
Low free testosterone predicts prostate cancer reclassification

Low free testosterone predicts prostate cancer reclassification

Lower levels of free testosterone predict an increased likelihood of disease reclassification in men with prostate cancer, researchers report. [More]
Professor receives grant from NIH to test effects of high-intensity functional training

Professor receives grant from NIH to test effects of high-intensity functional training

Katie Heinrich, assistant professor of kinesiology at Kansas State University, has been awarded an investigator-initiated grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases for more than $2.52 million. [More]
Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Almonds can help reduce inflammation in people with poorly controlled diabetes

Evidence continues to mount supporting the role of almonds and other tree nuts as part of an overall dietary pattern that is beneficial for those with type 2 diabetes. Three new studies suggest a relationship between regular consumption of tree nuts, such as almonds, and improvement in various markers of health in type 2 diabetes. [More]
Acidity sensor helps to estimate dynamics of insulin production

Acidity sensor helps to estimate dynamics of insulin production

Many human metabolic functions only run smoothly if the acid level in the body remains neutral and stable. For humans, normal blood pH values lie between 7.35 and 7.45. By way of comparison, an empty stomach is extremely acidic, with a pH value of 1.5. [More]
Tree nuts have positive impact on glycemic control in diabetes and on metabolic syndrome criteria

Tree nuts have positive impact on glycemic control in diabetes and on metabolic syndrome criteria

Two new meta-analyses involving tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts) were recently published in the online publications, British Medical Journal Open (BMJ Open) and PLOS ONE. [More]
New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

New hope for people suffering from obesity and diabetes

White, brown and beige adipocytes, or fat cells, are inherently different. Each of these cell types has different functions and each plays its own role in metabolism. In the human body, white adipose tissue is by far the most prevalent. [More]
Healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors avoid metabolic syndrome

Healthy lifestyle may help childhood cancer survivors avoid metabolic syndrome

A new study has found that following a healthy lifestyle may lower childhood cancer survivors’ risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that children with cancer and adults who had cancer when they were children should receive information about how their lifestyle may influence their long-term health. [More]
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital earns Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital earns Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital has been named one of 15 recipients of the Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award from the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve of the Department of Defense. [More]
Lifestyle impacts likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors

Lifestyle impacts likelihood of developing metabolic syndrome in childhood cancer survivors

A St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study found that 73 percent of adult survivors of childhood cancer more than doubled their risk of developing metabolic syndrome and related health problems by failing to follow a heart-healthy lifestyle. The results appear in the current issue of the journal Cancer. [More]
Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

Researchers recommend low carbohydrate diet for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes

A new study involving researchers from the University of Alabama at Birmingham and other institutions says patients with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes should eat a diet low in carbohydrates. [More]
Lipoic acid appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms

Lipoic acid appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms

Researchers have discovered a possible explanation for the surprisingly large range of biological effects that are linked to a micronutrient called lipoic acid: It appears to reset and synchronize circadian rhythms, or the "biological clock" found in most life forms. [More]
Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of adverse health effects of too much sitting

Physical fitness may buffer some of the adverse health effects of too much sitting, according to a new study by researchers from the American Cancer Society, The Cooper Institute, and the University of Texas. [More]
Promising new drug for metabolic syndrome

Promising new drug for metabolic syndrome

University of Utah researchers have discovered that an enzyme involved in intracellular signaling plays a crucial role in developing metabolic syndrome, a finding that has a U of U spinoff company developing a drug to potentially treat the condition. [More]
Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Study reveals mechanism underlying abnormal fat accumulation in HIV patients

Building upon their earlier research on the biology of fat metabolism, Joslin scientists discovered that microRNAs -small RNA molecules that play important roles in regulation in many types of tissue - play a major role in the distribution and determination of fat cells and whole body metabolism. [More]
Metabolic syndrome components may influence LUTS/BPH

Metabolic syndrome components may influence LUTS/BPH

Abdominal aortic calcification and visceral fat obesity each seem to influence lower urinary tract symptoms in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia, study findings suggest. [More]
GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

GNS automated data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome in patients

Research published today in The American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]
Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Analysis of patient records can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome

Research published today in the American Journal of Managed Care demonstrates that analysis of patient records using state-of-the-art data analytics can predict future risk of metabolic syndrome. [More]
Researchers find that BMI tool misses children who should be considered obese

Researchers find that BMI tool misses children who should be considered obese

Physicians using body mass index (BMI) to diagnose children as obese may be missing 25 percent of kids who have excess body fat despite a normal BMI, which can be a serious concern for long-term health, according to a Mayo Clinic study published online today in Pediatric Obesity. [More]