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Researchers assemble full genome of living organism using Oxford Nanopore's MinIONTM device

Researchers assemble full genome of living organism using Oxford Nanopore's MinIONTM device

Researchers in Canada and the U.K. have for the first time sequenced and assembled de novo the full genome of a living organism, the bacteria Escherichia Coli, using Oxford Nanopore's MinIONTM device, a genome sequencer that can fit in the palm of your hand. [More]
Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers locate promising target for potential vaccine against malaria

Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health have located a new - and likely more promising, they say - target for a potential vaccine against malaria, a mosquito-borne illness that kills as many as 750,000 people each year. [More]
Modifying small white blood cells may help treat immune disorders

Modifying small white blood cells may help treat immune disorders

Modifying the small white blood cells that protect against disease might help treat immune disorders, according to a study published in Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, the basic science journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. [More]
Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

Researchers uncover new mechanism that innate immune system uses to curb viral infections

An innovative mechanism that the innate immune system uses to control viral infections has been uncovered by researchers at the University Medical Centers in Mainz and Freiburg. Central to this is the discovery that two different but related elements of the immune system can act together in concert to fight, for example, rotavirus infections. [More]
Weill Cornell scientists reveal how XBP1 gene can trigger immune responses against ovarian tumors

Weill Cornell scientists reveal how XBP1 gene can trigger immune responses against ovarian tumors

Ovarian cancer shuts down immune system cells that would otherwise act as a first line of defense against the deadly tumor, Weill Cornell Medical College scientists report today. But a therapy that restores the cells' disease-fighting abilities could provide a powerful new strategy to attack the cancer, which kills more than 14,000 women each year. [More]

ESCMID introduces two new study groups to create networks for forensic and veterinary microbiology

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases launched two new study groups; the Forensic and Postmortem Microbiology Study Group and the Veterinary Microbiology Study Group. [More]
St. George's University participates in groundbreaking study to tackle mosquito-borne diseases in Grenada

St. George's University participates in groundbreaking study to tackle mosquito-borne diseases in Grenada

St. George's University recently participated in a groundbreaking feasibility study for an infectious disease surveillance system conducted with a team of researchers and scientists in Grenada. [More]
Bay Area Lyme Foundation announces winners of 2015 Emerging Leader Award

Bay Area Lyme Foundation announces winners of 2015 Emerging Leader Award

Bay Area Lyme Foundation, the leading national nonprofit funder of innovative Lyme disease research, today announced that the winners of its 2015 Emerging Leader Award, are collaborators Nira Pollock, MD, PhD, and John Branda, MD. [More]
Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Massey researchers aim to develop models that can predict complications from stem cell transplantation

Researchers at VCU Massey Cancer Center's Bone Marrow Transplant Program have recently published findings from a phase 2 clinical trial that demonstrate lymphocyte recovery in related and unrelated stem cell transplant recipients generally falls into three patterns that are significantly associated with survival. [More]
UTHealth microbiologist recognized for teaching excellence

UTHealth microbiologist recognized for teaching excellence

Kevin Morano, Ph.D., a microbiologist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, has been recognized for teaching excellence by the Minnie Stevens Piper Foundation. [More]
Enhancing body's gut defense system can reverse bloodstream infections

Enhancing body's gut defense system can reverse bloodstream infections

An upset in the body's natural balance of gut bacteria that may lead to life-threatening bloodstream infections can be reversed by enhancing a specific immune defense response, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Cell fusion triggers multiple genetic changes that convert normal cells to cancer cells

Although there is no one established universal cause of cancer, genetic changes are central to its development. The accumulation of spontaneous genetic changes, or mutations, that occur when cells divide can be hastened by exposure to carcinogens such as cigarette smoke (lung cancer) and infectious agents such as the papillomavirus (cervical cancer). [More]
Study suggests new strategies to stop spread of Staph infections

Study suggests new strategies to stop spread of Staph infections

Staphylococcus aureus -- better known as Staph -- is a common inhabitant of the human nose, and people who carry it are at increased risk for dangerous Staph infections. [More]
AWMSG recommends Daklinza (daclatasvir) for treatment of adult patients with chronic HCV infection

AWMSG recommends Daklinza (daclatasvir) for treatment of adult patients with chronic HCV infection

The All Wales Medicines Strategy Group has recommended Daklinza (daclatasvir) for the treatment of adult patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The recommendation is specifically for patients with advanced liver disease, for whom treatment options can be limited. [More]
New Tel Aviv University research introduces promising new tool to combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

New Tel Aviv University research introduces promising new tool to combat antibiotic-resistant pathogens

At its annual assembly in Geneva last week, the World Health Organization approved a radical and far-reaching plan to slow the rapid, extensive spread of antibiotic resistance around the world. The plan hopes to curb the rise caused by an unchecked use of antibiotics and lack of new antibiotics on the market. [More]
PQBP1 protein could improve body's immune response to HIV vaccines

PQBP1 protein could improve body's immune response to HIV vaccines

In a scientific discovery that has significant implications for preventing HIV infections, researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have identified a protein that could improve the body's immune response to HIV vaccines and prevent transmission of the virus. [More]

Pediatric Sepsis diagnosed in three to five hours versus two to six days data at ASM

The data presented today demonstrate that in each of the 15 confirmed candidemia pediatric patient samples in the study, T2Candida was able to accurately identify the Candida species in three to five hours compared to two to six days for blood culture... [More]
Penn Medicine researchers explore primary player involved in T cell exhaustion

Penn Medicine researchers explore primary player involved in T cell exhaustion

Sometimes even cells get tired. When the T cells of your immune system are forced to deal over time with cancer or a chronic infection such as HIV or hepatitis C, they can develop 'T cell exhaustion,' becoming less effective and losing their ability to attack and destroy the invaders of the body. [More]

Better treatment, prevention strategies still needed for opportunistic infections related to AIDS

Although treatment advances have dramatically reduced deaths from opportunistic infections related to AIDS, a new study drawing on 30 years of data from more than 20,000 patients in San Francisco suggests there is still ample room to improve. About a third--35 percent--of AIDS patients diagnosed with their first opportunistic infection from 1997 to 2012 in that city died within five years, according to the study, published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
Roche announces FDA 510(k) clearance for cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test

Roche announces FDA 510(k) clearance for cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test

Roche announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has provided 510(k) clearance for the cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test for the direct detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA in anogenital specimens from symptomatic patients. With dual target detection and automation, the cobas HSV 1 and 2 Test provides laboratories with the capability to report up to 94 results in significantly less time than traditional methods and provides a simplified workflow for sample handling in the laboratory. [More]
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