Microbiology News and Research RSS Feed - Microbiology News and Research

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment early improves survival among patients with newly diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. [More]
Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

Severe burns dramatically change bacteria populations, study finds

A study published in PLOS ONE has found that burn patients experience dramatic changes in the 100 trillion bacteria inside the gastrointestinal tract. [More]
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]

Leica DM2500 LED Microscope for clinical laboratories and research applications launched by Leica Microsystems

With the launch of the Leica DM2500 LED, Leica Microsystems completes its Leica DM1000 to 3000 series of microscopes. All the models in this series are now available with LED illumination. The Leica DM2500 LED is suitable for demanding tasks in clinical laboratories as well as for research applications in microbiology, developmental biology, cytology, zoology, botany, and more. [More]
Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Harvard Medical School scientists reveal structure of vesicular stomatitis virus protein

Viruses need us. In order to multiply, viruses have to invade a host cell and copy their genetic information. To do so, viruses encode their own replication machinery or components that subvert the host replication machinery to their advantage. [More]
UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

Light switches for neurons have made enormous contributions to brain research by giving investigators access to "on switches" for brain cells. But, finding "off switches" has been much more challenging. [More]
HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV capsid protein plays crucial role in the virus' life cycle

HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. [More]
Blue-eyed individuals may have greater chance of becoming alcoholics

Blue-eyed individuals may have greater chance of becoming alcoholics

People with blue eyes might have a greater chance of becoming alcoholics, according to a unique new study by genetic researchers at the University of Vermont. [More]
New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

New discovery could lead to personalized treatment for colon cancer

A UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center discovery of just how a certain tumor suppressor molecule works to prevent tumor growth could lead to a personalized treatment approach for colon cancer. [More]
Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

Two antibodies show early promise in preventing and treating MERS

As the South Korean epidemic of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) continues unabated, researchers have raced to find treatments for the deadly virus, which has killed more than 400 people since it was first discovered three years ago in Saudi Arabia. [More]
UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

UM SOM researcher uncovers new details about the body's response to flu virus

The flu virus can be lethal. But what is often just as dangerous is the body's own reaction to the invader. This immune response consists of an inflammatory attack, meant to kill the virus. But if it gets too aggressive, this counterattack can end up harming the body's own tissues, causing damage that can lead to death. [More]
Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea announces UK launch of broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera for first-line treatment of pneumonia

Basilea Pharmaceutica AG today announces the UK launch of its broad-spectrum Cephalosporin Zevtera (Ceftobiprole medocaril) for the first-line treatment of serious bacterial pneumonia. [More]
Dipexium Pharmaceuticals intends to sell common stock in underwritten public offering

Dipexium Pharmaceuticals intends to sell common stock in underwritten public offering

Dipexium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a late stage pharmaceutical company focused on the development and commercialization of Locilex (pexiganan cream 0.8%), today announced it intends to offer and sell common stock in an underwritten public offering. [More]
Scientists build fully functional neuron using organic bioelectronics

Scientists build fully functional neuron using organic bioelectronics

Scientists at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet have managed to build a fully functional neuron by using organic bioelectronics. [More]
Generic heart disease drugs show promise in patients affected by Ebola virus

Generic heart disease drugs show promise in patients affected by Ebola virus

Generic medications used frequently in the management of heart disease patients also have the potential to bolster the immune systems of patients with Ebola virus and some other life-threatening illnesses, researchers report this week in mBio, the online open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
UMass Amherst reports how two molecular pathways get together to ensure normal bacterial growth

UMass Amherst reports how two molecular pathways get together to ensure normal bacterial growth

As part of their long-term investigation of regulatory factors in the bacterial cell cycle, molecular biologists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst now report finding a surprising new role for one factor, CpdR, an adaptor that helps to regulate selective protein destruction, the main control mechanism of cell cycle progression in bacteria, at specific times. [More]
High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

High-fat, high-sugar diet can cause bacterial changes that appear related to loss of 'cognitive flexibility'

A study at Oregon State University indicates that both a high-fat and a high-sugar diet, compared to a normal diet, cause changes in gut bacteria that appear related to a significant loss of "cognitive flexibility," or the power to adapt and adjust to changing situations. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists devise new technique to identify cell that replenishes adult heart muscle

UT Southwestern scientists devise new technique to identify cell that replenishes adult heart muscle

Regenerative medicine researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a cell that replenishes adult heart muscle by using a new cell lineage-tracing technique they devised. [More]
Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

Purdue University-led study could lead to better treatments for people infected with MERS virus

A Purdue University-led team of researchers studying the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, have found molecules that shut down the activity of an essential enzyme in the virus and could lead the way to better treatments for those infected. [More]
Finding may pave way for much-needed treatments for people with epilepsy

Finding may pave way for much-needed treatments for people with epilepsy

An amino acid whose role in the body has been all but a mystery appears to act as a potent seizure inhibitor in mice, according to a study by researchers at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement