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Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers discover new clue to understanding how TB medication attacks dormant TB bacteria

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they have discovered a new clue to understanding how the most important medication for tuberculosis (TB) works to attack dormant TB bacteria in order to shorten treatment. [More]
Canadian government to donate experimental vaccine to combat Ebola virus

Canadian government to donate experimental vaccine to combat Ebola virus

The Honourable Rona Ambrose, Minister of Health, today announced that the Government of Canada will donate doses of an experimental Ebola vaccine developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada to the World Health Organization (WHO) in its role as an international coordinating body in responding to the ongoing Ebola outbreak in West Africa. [More]
CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

CAP awards accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine

The Accreditation Committee of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) has awarded accreditation to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania based on results of a recent on-site inspection as part of the CAP's Accreditation Programs. [More]
Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

Researchers discover highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of pathogen in Ohio

A team of clinician researchers has discovered a highly virulent, multidrug resistant form of the pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in patient samples in Ohio. [More]
Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

Injecting vaccine-like compound into mice effective in protecting from malaria

A study led by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health researchers found that injecting a vaccine-like compound into mice was effective in protecting them from malaria. [More]
GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

GW researcher awarded grant to develop a model system to study PN infection

According to a recent World Health Organization report of the leading causes of death worldwide, one-third of all deaths are due to infectious and parasitic diseases. There are currently no vaccines for parasitic nematode (PN), or worm infections in humans, and development of new drugs and vaccines will stall until researchers have a better understanding of PN biology. [More]
Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

Researchers find that animal's ability to endure internal parasite strongly influences reproductive success

In the first evidence that natural selection favors an individual's infection tolerance, researchers from Princeton University and the University of Edinburgh have found that an animal's ability to endure an internal parasite strongly influences its reproductive success. [More]
Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

Researchers plan to develop vaccine into a type of antibody serum therapy

By many estimates, an Ebola vaccine could be available in humans as early as next year. But will it be the right one? There are a number of vaccines in development and each is in a race to prove that it is most effective, safe and that it will protect the largest number of people. [More]
Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Gut microbiome analysis has potential to be a new tool for noninvasive colorectal cancer screening

Analysis of the gut microbiome more successfully distinguished healthy individuals from those with precancerous adenomatous polyps and those with invasive colorectal cancer compared with assessment of clinical risk factors and fecal occult blood testing, according to data published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
PET-CT using FDG-labeled leucocytes may help in detecting infection in patients with acute pancreatitis

PET-CT using FDG-labeled leucocytes may help in detecting infection in patients with acute pancreatitis

A new study diagnosing infection in patients with pancreatic fluid collections may swiftly and accurately rule out active infection in the body. [More]
Scientists shed new light on why teenagers are susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia

Scientists shed new light on why teenagers are susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia

University of York scientists have shed new light on why teenagers and young adults are particularly susceptible to meningitis and septicaemia. [More]
Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Modulation of B cells may effectively treat symptoms of type 2 diabetes and periodontitis

Going to the dentist isn't fun for anyone, but for those with periodontal disease related to type 2 diabetes, a new research discovery may have them smiling. [More]
U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

U.S.-funded effort revitalizes, expands medical education in sub-Saharan Africa

Medical education in sub-Saharan Africa is being revitalized and expanded through a U.S.-funded effort that is dramatically increasing enrollment, broadening curricula, upgrading Internet access and providing cutting-edge skills labs and other technologies. [More]
Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Researchers develop vaccine against potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease

Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine researchers have made an important advancement toward developing a vaccine against the debilitating and potentially deadly tick-transmitted disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis (HGA). [More]
Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

New stem-cell discovery may lead to more streamlined process for tissue regeneration

A new stem-cell discovery might one day lead to a more streamlined process for obtaining stem cells, which in turn could be used in the development of replacement tissue for failing body parts, according to UC San Francisco scientists who reported the findings in the current edition of Cell. [More]
Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

Findings reveal new way to identify non-antibiotic drugs that could help curb bacterial infections

About 100 drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other purposes can also prevent the growth of certain bacterial pathogens inside human cells, including those that cause Legionnaires' disease, brucellosis, and Mediterranean spotted fever. [More]
Urinary microbiome altered in urge incontinence

Urinary microbiome altered in urge incontinence

The frequency and nature of bacteria in the urinary tract differs significantly between healthy women and those with urge incontinence, a US study demonstrates. [More]
Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. [More]
Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers exploring ways to stimulate patients' immune system to attack tumors

Researchers at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center are exploring ways to wake up the immune system so it recognizes and attacks invading cancer cells. Tumors protect themselves by tricking the immune system into accepting everything as normal, even while cancer cells are dividing and spreading. [More]