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Scientists develop genetically engineered T cells with fusion inhibitor to disrupt HIV's harpoon

Scientists develop genetically engineered T cells with fusion inhibitor to disrupt HIV's harpoon

When HIV attacks a T cell, it attaches itself to the cell's surface and launches a "harpoon" to create an opening to enter and infect the cells. [More]
New research shows impact of fiber deprivation on mouse gut

New research shows impact of fiber deprivation on mouse gut

It sounds like the plot of a 1950s science fiction movie: normal, helpful bacteria that begin to eat their host from within, because they don't get what they want. [More]
Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

Getting drugs to bugs in NTM lung infections: an interview with Dr Jakko van Ingen

The first thing that is important to stress is that this is an area that we actually know very little about. What we generally think, rather than know, is that NTM has a lot in common with pulmonary tuberculosis. [More]
Highly antibiotic-resistant infections on the rise among U.S. children, study reports

Highly antibiotic-resistant infections on the rise among U.S. children, study reports

Highly drug-resistant infections are on the rise among U.S. children, reports a new study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. [More]
GW researchers awarded $2.2 million NCI grant to study role of HERVs in cancer

GW researchers awarded $2.2 million NCI grant to study role of HERVs in cancer

George Washington University researchers received a $2.2 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to uncover why certain cancer types increase whereas others are unchanged or even decrease in those with HIV infection. [More]
Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Leishmaniasis infection rates increase among ecotourists, soldiers in the U.S.

Driven by burgeoning ecotourism and military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, a parasitic infection called leishmaniasis is showing up in more U.S. patients, often stumping doctors. [More]
DNAtrix enters into license agreement with University of Florida to develop new oncolytic virus platform

DNAtrix enters into license agreement with University of Florida to develop new oncolytic virus platform

DNAtrix, a clinical stage biotechnology company developing virus-driven immunotherapies for cancer, announced it has entered into an exclusive license agreement with the University of Florida, Gainesville to develop a novel oncolytic virus platform. [More]
Researchers find timing, duration of androgen exposure can influence genital defects in female mice

Researchers find timing, duration of androgen exposure can influence genital defects in female mice

University of Florida researchers have identified cells targeted by a male hormone and found that an excess of that hormone at a specific time can cause genital defects in female mice. [More]
Researchers develop new strategy to immunize against microbes that cause foodborne illness

Researchers develop new strategy to immunize against microbes that cause foodborne illness

University of California, Irvine and MIT researchers have developed a new strategy to immunize against microbes that invade the gastrointestinal tract, including Salmonella, which causes more foodborne illness in the United States than any other bacteria. [More]
Scientists turn iron-scavenging power against common UTI-causing bacteria

Scientists turn iron-scavenging power against common UTI-causing bacteria

For most invading bacteria, the bladder is not a friendly place. But for those that have figured out how to scavenge iron from their hosts, it's a fine place to grow and reproduce. [More]
Researchers discover antibody that can protect fetus from Zika virus in pregnant mice

Researchers discover antibody that can protect fetus from Zika virus in pregnant mice

The most devastating consequence of Zika virus infection is the development of microcephaly, or an abnormally small head, in babies who were infected in utero. [More]
Soiled clinical linens may be source of surface C. difficile contamination, study finds

Soiled clinical linens may be source of surface C. difficile contamination, study finds

A new paper published in FEMS Microbiology Letters, resulting from an investigation of a laundry facility that services several Seattle-area hospitals, suggests that soiled clinical linens may be a source of surface Clostridium difficile contamination. [More]
Scientists develop new molecular method for detecting parasite in ham that causes toxoplasmosis

Scientists develop new molecular method for detecting parasite in ham that causes toxoplasmosis

Scientists from the universities of Granada and Valencia have developed a new molecular method for determining the presence of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which causes toxoplasmosis, in samples of ham. [More]
Polysorbate slows toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate slows toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate, a safe additive found in everything from ice cream to cosmetics, has been proven to slow the toxic effects of E. coli poisoning. [More]
Smoking may shorten HIV patients' lifespan more than HIV itself

Smoking may shorten HIV patients' lifespan more than HIV itself

Among people living with HIV who smoke cigarettes, smoking may now shorten their lifespan more than HIV itself, according to a new modeling study published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases. [More]
International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

International travellers may spread antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in their home countries, study reveals

Airports are international travel hubs visited by large numbers of people. London Heathrow, for example, has an average of 205,400 travellers every day and saw 75 million people arriving and departing from all over the world in 2015. [More]

Tufts researcher receives PSIPW Creativity Award for developing Cholera Outbreak Prediction system

Shafiqul Islam, Sc.D., of Tufts University School of Engineering, has been awarded the 7th Prince Sultan Bin Abdulaziz International Prize for Water Creativity Award, one of most prestigious international awards focusing on water-related scientific innovation. [More]
Safe food additive can slow toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Safe food additive can slow toxic effects of E. coli poisoning

Polysorbate, a safe additive found in everything from ice cream to cosmetics, has been proven to slow the toxic effects of E. coli poisoning. [More]
Scientists discover previously unknown mechanism that prevents autoimmune disease

Scientists discover previously unknown mechanism that prevents autoimmune disease

A previously unknown safety mechanism in our immune system keeps the body free from autoimmune diseases. [More]
Researchers develop new way to prevent diseases caused by herpesvirus infections

Researchers develop new way to prevent diseases caused by herpesvirus infections

A new approach has been developed to combat diseases caused by herpesvirus infections, including everything from cold sores to cancer. [More]
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