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SLU researchers awarded NIH grants to search for a drug to cure hepatitis B

SLU researchers awarded NIH grants to search for a drug to cure hepatitis B

Two grants from the National Institutes of Health will allow Saint Louis University researchers to build on breakthroughs in understanding the hepatitis B virus and begin the search for a drug to cure - not just halt - the illness. [More]
ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

ASU scientist selected as 2014 recipient of Lifetime Achievement Award

Roy Curtiss III, a scientist at the Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University, has been selected as the 2014 recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Society for Microbiology. [More]
TG2 protein is a key mediator in Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, study finds

TG2 protein is a key mediator in Porphyromonas gingivalis infection, study finds

Scientists at Forsyth, along with a colleague from Northwestern University, have discovered that the protein, Transgultaminase 2 (TG2), is a key component in the process of gum disease. TG2 is widely distributed inside and outside of human cells. The scientists found that blocking some associations of TG2 prevents the bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (PG) from adhering to cells. This insight may one day help lead to novel therapies to prevent gum disease caused by PG. [More]
Scientist receives $275,000 grant to study human papillomavirus that causes head and neck cancer

Scientist receives $275,000 grant to study human papillomavirus that causes head and neck cancer

Basic scientists focus on understanding how things work, so most don't get the chance to directly impact other people's lives. That's why Michelle Ozbun, PhD, is very excited about her recent grant to study human papillomavirus. [More]
Breastfeeding increases prevalence of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in infants

Breastfeeding increases prevalence of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria in infants

Breastfeeding until at least nine months of age increases prevalence in the gastrointestinal tract of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, species which are known to contribute to development of a healthy immune system, according to a paper describing the establishment of the intestinal microbiota during the first three years of life. [More]
NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

NIH awards $28M grant to establish new center for excellence to find treatment for Ebola virus

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a five-year, $28 million grant to establish a new center for excellence to find an antibody "cocktail" to fight two types of viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever, including the deadly Ebola virus. The project involves researchers from 15 institutions, including Kartik Chandran, Ph.D., and Jonathan Lai, Ph.D., at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Einstein will receive approximately $4 million of the total grant. [More]
Researchers uncover new connection between allergy and cancer

Researchers uncover new connection between allergy and cancer

While many are stocking up on allergy medicine in preparation for spring, a new study from researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center has uncovered a new connection between allergy and cancer that could potentially lead to therapies involving common antihistamines. [More]
Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Preterm babies' guts harbor infectious microbes that can cause late-onset sepsis

Babies born prematurely are surviving in increasing numbers. But many withstand complications of early birth only to suffer late-onset sepsis - life-threatening bloodstream infections that strike after infants reach 72 hours of age. [More]

Quail and chickens are likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans

Among the copious species of poultry in China, quail and chickens are the likely sources of infection of H7N9 influenza virus to humans, according to a paper published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. [More]
People who experience chronic sleep disturbance could face earlier onset of dementia, Alzheimer's

People who experience chronic sleep disturbance could face earlier onset of dementia, Alzheimer's

People who experience chronic sleep disturbance—either through their work, insomnia or other reasons—could face an earlier onset of dementia and Alzheimer's, according to a new pre-clinical study by researchers at Temple University. [More]
Researchers discover how STAT3 protein breaches antitumor mechanism prior to cancer development

Researchers discover how STAT3 protein breaches antitumor mechanism prior to cancer development

A Stony Brook University-led international team of infectious disease researchers have discovered how a cellular protein, called STAT3, which is overactive in a majority of human cancers, interferes with an antitumor mechanism in cells and therefore promotes the growth of cancer. [More]
Researchers Study how Marburg virus and host protein interaction help in developing inhibitors of virus

Researchers Study how Marburg virus and host protein interaction help in developing inhibitors of virus

A protein that normally protects cells from environmental stresses has been shown to interact Marburg virus VP24, allowing the deadly Marburg virus to live longer and replicate better, according to a cell culture study led by scientists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. [More]
Researchers to send 48 microbes to International Space Station

Researchers to send 48 microbes to International Space Station

Microbes collected from Northern California and throughout the nation will soon blast into orbit for research and a microgravity growth competition on the International Space Station (ISS). [More]

Bacterium and fungus partner to cause painful form of tooth decay in preschool children

Early childhood caries, a highly aggressive and painful form of tooth decay that frequently occurs in preschool children, especially from backgrounds of poverty, may result from a nefarious partnership between a bacterium and a fungus, according to a paper published ahead of print in the journal Infection and Immunity. [More]
Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students to receive 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award

Thirteen graduate students from institutes throughout North America have been chosen to receive the 2014 Harold M. Weintraub Graduate Student Award sponsored by the Basic Sciences Division of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. [More]

Food picked up just few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria

Food picked up just a few seconds after being dropped is less likely to contain bacteria than if it is left for longer periods of time, according to the findings of research carried out at Aston University's School of Life and Health Sciences. [More]
Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $11.3 million for Q4 2013

Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals reports net loss of $11.3 million for Q4 2013

Tetraphase Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today reported financial results for the quarter and full year ended December 31, 2013. [More]
Researchers awarded $26M NIH grant to advance treatments for Ebola and Marburg

Researchers awarded $26M NIH grant to advance treatments for Ebola and Marburg

The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Profectus Biosciences, Tekmira Pharmaceuticals and the Vanderbilt University Medical Center have been awarded up to $26 million to advance treatments of the highly lethal hemorrhagic fever viruses Ebola and Marburg. [More]
Expression of MYC gene important for neurogenesis in the spinal cord

Expression of MYC gene important for neurogenesis in the spinal cord

Research from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden suggests that the expression of the so called MYC gene is important and necessary for neurogenesis in the spinal cord. The findings are being published in the journal EMBO Reports. [More]
Local hyperthermia treatment induces mechanism of anti-tumor immune resistance

Local hyperthermia treatment induces mechanism of anti-tumor immune resistance

A combination of iron-oxide nanoparticles and an alternating magnetic field, which together generate heat, have activated an immune system response to tumors in mice according to an accepted manuscript by Dartmouth-Hitchcock Norris Cotton Center researchers in the journal Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine released online on February 24, 2014. [More]