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A migraine is a severe headache causing pain in the front or side of the head.

In the UK, migraines affect about 15% of the population and the headaches are three times more common among women than men. Migraines usually first start in young adulthood but it is possible for the headaches to start later in life.

There are several different types of migraine but the most common are migraines with aura and those without aura. Aura is the term used to describe warning signs that occur just before the migraine starts such as visual problems (e.g. flashing lights) or stiffness in the neck and shoulders. Less commonly, a migraine without a headache occurs where only aura or other migraine symptoms are experienced, but no headache actually develops.

Severe migraines can be disabling and very distressing with sufferers needing to stay in bed for days at a time and therefore sometimes having to be absent at school or work.

It’s not fully understood what causes migraines, but common triggers of the condition include stress, disrupted sleep pattern and tiredness, poor posture, certain foods or drink such as chocolate, cheese, and caffeine, loud noises, bright or flickering light, and dehydration.
Targeting B cells may help reduce disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis

Targeting B cells may help reduce disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis

A new study suggests that targeting B cells, which are a type of white blood cell in the immune system, may be associated with reduced disease activity for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Education is associated with better recovery from traumatic brain injury, says study

Education is associated with better recovery from traumatic brain injury, says study

People with more years of education may be better able to recover from a traumatic brain injury, according to a study published in the April 23, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

New studies may offer hope for people with migraine

Two new studies may offer hope for people with migraine. The two studies released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

Narrowing of carotid artery in neck without any symptoms may be linked to memory problems

For the first time, researchers have demonstrated that narrowing of the carotid artery in the neck without any symptoms may be linked to problems in learning, memory, thinking and decision-making, compared to people with similar risk factors but no narrowing in the neck artery, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]

Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]

Federal district court enforces settlement between Mylan and Endo Pharmaceuticals on generic FROVA

Mylan Inc. today confirmed that a federal district court has granted its request to enforce a settlement agreement between Endo Pharmaceuticals and Mylan settling patent litigation in connection with Mylan's filing of an Abbreviated New Drug Application (ANDA) with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Frovatriptan Succinate Tablets, 2.5 mg. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

ER physicians discount early signs of strokes among women, minorities, younger people

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]

Doctors overlook early signs of strokes in people each year

Analyzing federal health care data, a team of researchers led by a Johns Hopkins specialist concluded that doctors overlook or discount the early signs of potentially disabling strokes in tens of thousands of American each year, a large number of them visitors to emergency rooms complaining of dizziness or headaches. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]

FDA accepts AVP-825 NDA for acute treatment of migraine

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has accepted the New Drug Application (NDA) for AVP-825, an innovative closed-palate Breath Powered investigational drug-device combination product for the acute treatment of migraine. [More]
Study highlights importance of stress management, healthy lifestyle habits for people with migraine

Study highlights importance of stress management, healthy lifestyle habits for people with migraine

Migraine sufferers who experienced reduced stress from one day to the next are at significantly increased risk of migraine onset on the subsequent day, according to a new study conducted by researchers at the Montefiore Headache Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University. [More]
People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss in old age

People who develop diabetes and high blood pressure in middle age are more likely to have brain cell loss and other damage to the brain, as well as problems with memory and thinking skills, than people who never have diabetes or high blood pressure or who develop it in old age, according to a new study published in the March 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

People with prehypertension more likely to develop stroke

Anyone with blood pressure that's higher than the optimal 120/80 mmHg may be more likely to have a stroke, according to a new meta-analysis published in the March 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Cefaly medical device receives FDA approval for migraine prevention

CEFALY Technology announced today that its received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of the Cefaly medical device for the preventative treatment for migraine headaches. Cefaly is the first transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) device specifically authorized for use prior to the onset of pain. It is expected to be available in the U.S. in early April. [More]

Treating long wait-times dictate long-term success of spinal cord stimulation therapy

Success rates soared to 75% for patients who waited less than 2 years for a spinal cord stimulator (SCS) implant, compared with 15% for patients whose implants happened 20 years after the onset of pain, according to a retrospective analysis. [More]
Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics reports net income of $24 million for fourth quarter 2013

Safeguard Scientifics, Inc. today announced fourth quarter and full-year 2013 financial results. For the three months ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net income was $24.0 million, or $1.10 per share, compared to net loss of $10.8 million, or $0.51 per share for the same period in 2012. For the year ended December 31, 2013, Safeguard's net loss was $35.5 million, or $1.66 per share, compared to $39.4 million, or $1.88 per share for the same period in 2012. [More]
Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths as heart disease

Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths as heart disease

A new study suggests that Alzheimer's disease may contribute to close to as many deaths in the United States as heart disease or cancer. The research is published in the March 5, 2014, print issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Minimally invasive surgery outcomes show favorable results in low back pain patients

Minimally invasive surgery outcomes show favorable results in low back pain patients

Beaumont research findings published in the February online issue of Spine shows that patients who have a low back surgery called minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, end up better off in many ways than patients who have more invasive surgery to alleviate debilitating pain. [More]