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Aldosterone/renin ratio reliable diagnostic tool in infant primary hypoaldosteronism

Aldosterone/renin ratio reliable diagnostic tool in infant primary hypoaldosteronism

The ratio of aldosterone to renin in plasma is a reliable indicator of primary hypoaldosteronism in newborns and infants, say researchers. [More]
CORD calls upon governments, others to join forces to make Canada's Rare Disease Strategy a reality

CORD calls upon governments, others to join forces to make Canada's Rare Disease Strategy a reality

Today, on Parliament Hill, the Canadian Organization for Rare Disorders released Canada's Rare Disease Strategy and called upon the federal, provincial and territorial governments along researchers, healthcare providers, educators, employers, and the patient community to join forces to make the Strategy a reality. [More]
Prediagnostic lung function impairment common in older asthma patients

Prediagnostic lung function impairment common in older asthma patients

Older adults with newly diagnosed asthma are not only more likely to have pre-existing lung function impairment than younger adults, but they also experience a more rapid decline of lung function, a Danish team reports in Respiratory Medicine. [More]
Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

Novel computer-aided system developed for acute stroke detection

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80-100 computer images, the system is able to detect if the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. [More]
Spirometry underutilized for asthma management in U.S. adults

Spirometry underutilized for asthma management in U.S. adults

Researchers from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have found, for the first time, that spirometry was underutilized for asthma diagnosis and management in U.S. adults from 2001 to 2011, despite it's accuracy, cost effectiveness and the publication of national guidelines advocating its use. [More]
VisualDx tool aids physicians in diagnosing dermatologic conditions

VisualDx tool aids physicians in diagnosing dermatologic conditions

In the first major study to examine the use of a computer-assisted, photo-driven differential diagnosis generator for skin conditions, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found physicians routinely used the tool, without an increase in calling for inpatient dermatology consultations. [More]

Therapists twice as likely to misdiagnose mental illness in patients from socially disadvantaged groups

The shooting of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, MO, has ignited a global discussion about implicit racial bias. One group of people you might think would be immune from this hidden bias is clinical therapists, people trained to understand the human mind. But a new field study finds that the social identities of patients and their therapists affect the accuracy of the diagnosis: Therapists were twice as likely to misdiagnose mental illness when their patients were members of a disadvantaged, compared to an advantaged, group. [More]
Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Dengue fever circulating in urban areas of West Africa

Misdiagnosis of febrile illnesses as malaria is a continuing problem in Africa. A new study shows that in Ghana, dengue fever is circulating in urban areas and going undiagnosed. The authors of the study hope to use the findings to launch a widespread initiative to better understand acute undifferentiated febrile illnesses in West Africa. [More]
Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Novel image-analysis technique improves breast cancer detection and diagnosis

Researchers at the University of Oklahoma have developed an image-analysis technique that is designed to improve breast cancer detection and diagnosis. [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Study: Lyme disease costs the U.S. health care system up to $1.3 billion a year

Study: Lyme disease costs the U.S. health care system up to $1.3 billion a year

Lyme disease, transmitted by a bite from a tick infected by the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria, had long been considered easy to treat, usually requiring a single doctor's visit and a few weeks of antibiotics for most people. [More]
Second opinions can optimize outcomes and avoid needless expenses

Second opinions can optimize outcomes and avoid needless expenses

Mary Rockland was in a panic when she learned that she was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Like many patients, she trusted her doctor when he told her that a lump in her breast was cancerous, and relied on his judgment when he recommended a bilateral mastectomy. [More]
New app for clinical detection of skin cancer launched on World Cancer Day

New app for clinical detection of skin cancer launched on World Cancer Day

On World Cancer Day 2015, general practitioners, physicians and dermatologists in the United States, United Kingdom and Australia are being asked for their feedback during the advanced trial phase of a new, free app that has the potential to play a vital role in the clinical detection of skin cancer. [More]
Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

Effective vaccine booster schedules needed to fight against whooping cough resurgence

A key to victory in battle, according to Chinese general and military strategist Sun Tzu, is to know your enemy. In the current fight against whooping cough resurgence, perhaps the biggest obstacle is an incomplete understanding of its underlying causes, according to a University of Michigan population ecologist. [More]
Stress can trigger diabetes, depression and other autoimmune diseases

Stress can trigger diabetes, depression and other autoimmune diseases

Stress is an ability of humans to fight or flee when faced with problems affecting the individual. By changes in the organism, adaptation to various physical conditions is achieved: burns, bruises, bleeding or psychosocial traumas. [More]
Prodromal symptoms precede PD by up to a decade

Prodromal symptoms precede PD by up to a decade

Many prodromal symptoms of Parkinson’s disease appear long before a clinical diagnosis is made, shows a large study of patients in primary care. [More]
Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical to receive patent for groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope

Elegant Medical LLC today announced it will receive an issued patent from the US Patent and Trademark Office for its groundbreaking Stethos electronic stethoscope, the most significant advancement to the stethoscope in half a century. [More]
FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

FIRS mobilizes members to raise awareness on COPD

On World COPD Day (19 November 2014), the Forum of International Respiratory Societies (FIRS) is mobilizing its members to raise awareness of the disease and help prevent the risk factors that cause it. [More]
Rare neuroendocrine tumours may be misdiagnosed as Cushing’s disease

Rare neuroendocrine tumours may be misdiagnosed as Cushing’s disease

Ectopic tumours secreting corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone are very rare in children and can result in a misdiagnosis of Cushing’s disease, say researchers. [More]
FDG-PET technology less accurate in diagnosing lung cancer in regions where infections are common

FDG-PET technology less accurate in diagnosing lung cancer in regions where infections are common

A new analysis of published studies found that FDG-PET technology is less accurate in diagnosing lung cancer versus benign disease in regions where infections like histoplasmosis or tuberculosis are common. Misdiagnosis of lung lesions suspicious for cancer could lead to unnecessary tests and surgeries for patients, with additional potential complications and mortality. [More]
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