Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

Bacterium can use cell-content sharing to repair damaged siblings

A University of Wyoming faculty member led a research team that discovered a certain type of soil bacteria can use their social behavior of outer membrane exchange (OME) to repair damaged cells and improve the fitness of the bacteria population as a whole. [More]
Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

Nerve cells guide each other during embryonic development

When nerve cells form in an embryo they do not start off in the right place but have to be guided to their final position by navigating a kind of molecular and cellular "map" in order to function properly. In a recent research study published in Nature Communications neurobiologist Sara Wilson, Umeå University, found that during embryonic development different parts of the nerve cell are important for guiding other nerve cells into their physical positions. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers discover how and where chromosome fragile sites occur in human DNA

Researchers discover how and where chromosome fragile sites occur in human DNA

Using a novel method they developed to map chromosome breaks in a model organism, the budding yeast, Wenyi Feng, Ph.D., of Upstate Medical University and her colleagues have discovered new information as to how and where chromosome fragile sites can occur in human DNA. These sites are frequently observed in cancer cells and are responsible for causing genomic rearrangements. [More]
Scientists identify new molecules that destroy cancer cells, save healthy ones

Scientists identify new molecules that destroy cancer cells, save healthy ones

Researchers have identified new molecules that kill cancer cells while protecting healthy cells and that could be used to treat a variety of different cancers. The research shines a light on what happens to cells at the moment they become cancerous. [More]
MO BIO announces launch of PowerMag DNA Clean-Up Kit

MO BIO announces launch of PowerMag DNA Clean-Up Kit

MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., the leader in soil, environmental, plant and microbial nucleic acid purification, announces the launch of the PowerMag DNA Clean-Up Kit, for automated, hands-free clean-up of DNA samples that require a secondary purification for removal of PCR inhibitors. This kit features MO BIO's novel ClearMag magnetic bead technology. [More]
Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by same signaling molecules

Neurons and blood vessels often traverse the body side by side, a fact observed as early as the 16th century by the Flemish anatomist Andreas Vesalius. Only over the last ten years, however, researchers have discovered that the growth of neuronal and vascular networks is controlled by the same molecules. [More]
Discovery could help identify molecules that selectively target cancer cells

Discovery could help identify molecules that selectively target cancer cells

A new family of molecules that kill cancer cells and protect healthy cells could be used to treat a number of different cancers, including cervical, breast, ovarian and lung cancers. Research published in EBioMedicine shows that as well as targeting and killing cancer cells, the molecules generate a protective effect against toxic chemicals in healthy cells. [More]
Study sheds light on developing more targeted therapies against medulloblastoma

Study sheds light on developing more targeted therapies against medulloblastoma

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have gained ground toward developing more targeted therapies for the most common childhood brain tumor. [More]
LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

LSTM scientists one step closer to understanding why HAP increases risk of pneumonia

Scientists at LSTM have come a step closer to understanding why people exposed to household air pollution (HAP) are at higher risk of lung infections such as pneumonia and tuberculosis. [More]
Knowing the physical structure of amyloid beta-42 offers new view on amyloid propagation in Alzheimer's

Knowing the physical structure of amyloid beta-42 offers new view on amyloid propagation in Alzheimer's

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have determined the molecular structure of one of the proteins in the fine fibers of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This molecule, called amyloid beta-42, is toxic to nerve cells and is believed to provoke the disease cascade. [More]
Gene therapy is key to addressing Sanfilippo Syndrome, say Ohio scientists and clinicians

Gene therapy is key to addressing Sanfilippo Syndrome, say Ohio scientists and clinicians

Gene therapy is the delivery of DNA into a patient's cells to replace faulty or missing genes—or adds new genes—in an attempt to cure cancer or make changes so the body is better able to fight off disease. Scientists and clinicians have identified a number of different ways to do this, in an effort to correct malfunctioning or mutated genes. Many gene therapy clinical trials are ongoing to assess the safety and potential benefits in patients with rare diseases. [More]
LaVision BioTec announces the first International Users’ Meeting on their UltraMicroscope

LaVision BioTec announces the first International Users’ Meeting on their UltraMicroscope

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, announces the dates and venue of the first international users' meeting on their UltraMicroscope light sheet microscopy products. [More]
LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the research of Dr Matteo Iannacone of the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan where intravital microscopy is being applied to the study of host-viruses and associated immune responses. [More]
NEB announces issuance of US patent for RNA-seq technology

NEB announces issuance of US patent for RNA-seq technology

New England Biolabs, Inc. announces the issuance of United States Patent Number 8,999,677, which describes a novel method for retaining valuable strand-specific information contained within RNA transcripts. [More]
LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVision BioTec reports on the research work of the Milan-based Iannacone Laboratory to study virus responses using intravital microscopy

LaVison BioTec, developers of advanced microscopy solutions for the life sciences, report on the research of Dr Matteo Iannacone of the San Raffaele Scientific Institute in Milan where intravital microscopy is being applied to the study of host-viruses and associated immune responses. [More]
Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Pancreatic cancer rates higher in countries with less sunlight

Writing in the April 30 online issue of the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report pancreatic cancer rates are highest in countries with the least amount of sunlight. Low sunlight levels were due to a combination of heavy cloud cover and high latitude. [More]
New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

New device can turn smartphone into DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope

If you thought scanning one of those strange, square QR codes with your phone was somewhat advanced, hold on to your seat. Researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles have recently developed a device that can turn any smartphone into a DNA-scanning fluorescent microscope. [More]
Researchers discover key mechanism in neural death that causes Parkinson's disease

Researchers discover key mechanism in neural death that causes Parkinson's disease

In studying the molecular biology of brain development, a team of researchers led by Ludwig Stockholm director Thomas Perlmann has discovered how disruption of a developmental mechanism alters the very nerve cells that are most affected in Parkinson's disease. [More]
Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

Two world-renowned scientists receive Poland-U.S. Science Award

World-renowned scientists -- Prof. Mariusz Jaskólski of Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Poland, and Dr. Alexander Wlodawer of the National Cancer Institute, USA -- are the first winners of the Poland-U.S. Science Award granted jointly by the Foundation for Polish Science and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world's largest scientific association. [More]
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