Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
High indoor temperatures may worsen COPD symptoms

High indoor temperatures may worsen COPD symptoms

High indoor temperatures appear to worsen symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, particularly in homes that also have high levels of air pollutants, according to new research published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Researchers discover how cells know when to stop producing mRNA

Researchers discover how cells know when to stop producing mRNA

A new scientific study conducted by a team of leading geneticists has characterized how cells know when to stop translating DNA into proteins, a critical step in maintaining healthy protein levels and cell function. [More]
Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Research uncovers new clues to combat dengue and Zika virus

Structural biology research conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory has uncovered how small insecticidal protein crystals that are naturally produced by bacteria might be tailored to combat dengue fever and the Zika virus. [More]
New study reveals endocrine biological function of brown adipose tissue

New study reveals endocrine biological function of brown adipose tissue

Brown adipose tissue -main organ generating heat in the body- is also an endocrine organ that secretes signaling factors that activate the fat and carbohydrates metabolism. [More]
Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

Scientists discover new switch that coordinates DNA repair and cell death

The genetic information of every cell is encoded in the sequence of the DNA double helix. Double strand breaks in the DNA, which can be induced by radiation, are a dangerous threat to the cells, and if not properly repaired can lead to cancer. [More]
UC San Diego professor Samara Reck-Peterson named HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar

UC San Diego professor Samara Reck-Peterson named HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the Simons Foundation and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation has named Samara Reck-Peterson, PhD, an HHMI-Simons Faculty Scholar. [More]
Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing specific brain fats could be potential strategy for preventing epileptic seizures

Increasing the concentration of specific fats in the brain could suppress epileptic seizures. This is evident from ground-breaking research carried out by the research groups of Professor Patrik Verstreken and Professor Wim Versées. [More]
NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA and EMS nominate Dr. Sarah Petersen for 2016 KEY Award

NIGHTSEA, creators and manufacturers of the innovative Stereo Microscope Fluorescence Adapter (SFA), and Electron Microscopy Sciences (EMS) are pleased to award the second annual KEY Award for New Faculty to Dr. Sarah Petersen of Kenyon College. [More]
Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

Experts receive $5.2 million NIH grant to develop affordable test for diagnosing Chagas disease

An international team of researchers led by infectious disease experts at the University of Georgia has received $5.2 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop a more accurate, affordable diagnostic test for Chagas disease, a parasitic infection that kills more than 50,000 people each year in Central and South America. [More]
Researchers use computer modelling to identify mechanism behind aggressive brain tumours

Researchers use computer modelling to identify mechanism behind aggressive brain tumours

Researchers at Uppsala University have used computer modelling to study how brain tumours arise. [More]
Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments

Unique open science project shows way for development of new antimalarial treatments

Malaria remains one of the world's leading causes of mortality in developing countries. Last year alone, it killed more than 400,000 people, mostly young children. [More]
ATS releases new clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, management of LAM

ATS releases new clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, management of LAM

The American Thoracic Society and the Japanese Respiratory Society have published new clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), a rare lung disease that primarily affects women of child-bearing age. [More]
Research findings hold promise for new therapies using proliferating cells to treat patients with FECD

Research findings hold promise for new therapies using proliferating cells to treat patients with FECD

Researchers from Massachusetts Eye and Ear have, for the first time, identified rapidly proliferating cells (known as "neural crest-derived progenitor cells") in the corneal endothelium of specimens from normal corneas and from corneas with Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy (FECD), a condition in which the cells responsible for keeping the cornea clear die prematurely — often leading to blindness. [More]
ATR inhibitors show improved survival and effectiveness in animal models of cancer

ATR inhibitors show improved survival and effectiveness in animal models of cancer

Tumours are an accumulation of cells that divide without control, accumulating hundreds of chromosomal alterations and mutations in their DNA. [More]
Cone snail venom could hold key to efficient therapies for diabetes

Cone snail venom could hold key to efficient therapies for diabetes

New research has found that venom extracted from a species of marine cone snail could hold the key to developing 'ultra-fast-acting' insulins, leading to more efficient therapies for diabetes management. [More]
Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

Study shows increasing healthcare costs for infections linked to premise plumbing pathogens

A new analysis of 100 million Medicare records from U.S. adults aged 65 and older reveals rising healthcare costs for infections associated with opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens--disease-causing bacteria, such as Legionella--which can live inside drinking water distribution systems, including household and hospital water pipes. [More]
Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

Scientists discover potential new genetic causes for intellectual disability

An international group of researchers has for the first time identified a set of 30 inherited recessive genes that play a role in intellectual disability (ID), a neurodevelopmental disorder that, according to the Centers for Disease Control, affects as many as 213 million people around the world. [More]
Mathematical model explains molecular events linked to learning and memory formation

Mathematical model explains molecular events linked to learning and memory formation

A team of researchers has built a mathematical model that describes the molecular events associated with the beginning stage of learning and memory formation in the human brain. [More]
Acute COPD exacerbations linked to long-term decline in lung function

Acute COPD exacerbations linked to long-term decline in lung function

Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, are associated with significant long-term lung function loss, according to research published online, ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
School-based exercises may benefit bone mass, strength in growing children

School-based exercises may benefit bone mass, strength in growing children

Moderate to high impact sports such as gymnastics, basketball, or football have been shown to benefit bone mass, structure and strength - with benefits particularly apparent during pre-and early adolescence. [More]
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