Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

Research performed in anemic mice shows acetate stimulates the formation of red blood cells

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers seeking novel treatments for anemia found that giving acetate, the major component of household vinegar, to anemic mice stimulated the formation of new red blood cells. [More]
Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

Early exposure to marijuana can lead to immune-related diseases in adulthood

When it comes to using marijuana, new research, involving mice and published in the October 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggests that just because you can do it, doesn't mean that you should. That's because a team of Italian scientists have found that using marijuana in adolescence may do serious long-term damage to the immune system. [More]
Oral afatinib significantly improves progression-free survival in patients with head and neck cancer

Oral afatinib significantly improves progression-free survival in patients with head and neck cancer

The tyrosine kinase inhibitor afatinib significantly improved progression-free survival compared to methotrexate in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck after failure of platinum-based chemotherapy, the results of a phase III trial show. [More]
UCLA research may lead to novel treatment for PH1

UCLA research may lead to novel treatment for PH1

Research by UCLA biochemists may lead to a new treatment - or even a cure - for PH1, a rare and potentially deadly genetic kidney disease that afflicts children. Their findings also may provide important insights into treatments for Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and other degenerative diseases. [More]
Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Scientists discover new clues about drug used in treating blood cancer

Keck Medicine of USC scientists have discovered new clues about a drug instrumental in treating a certain blood cancer that may provide important targets for researchers searching for cures. [More]
Triple-punch of antibodies prevents, wipes out hepatitis C infection in laboratory mice

Triple-punch of antibodies prevents, wipes out hepatitis C infection in laboratory mice

A triple-punch of antibodies both prevented hepatitis C infection and wiped out the disease after it had established itself in laboratory mice, according to a study led by Princeton University researchers. [More]
Mfn2 protein: A future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in ischemic stroke

Mfn2 protein: A future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in ischemic stroke

A new study published in the prestigious publication The EMBO Journal shows that the mitochondrial protein Mfn2 may be a future therapeutic target for neuronal death reduction in the late phases of an ischemic stroke. [More]
Circulating tumour cell clinical research collaboration announced between EKF Diagnostics and Massachusetts General Hospital

Circulating tumour cell clinical research collaboration announced between EKF Diagnostics and Massachusetts General Hospital

EKF Diagnostics, the global diagnostics company, announces that it has entered into a two year research collaboration with Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), a global leader in successfully bridging innovative science with state-of-the-art clinical medicine, to develop PointMan™ assays that can effectively detect treatable cancer mutations in blood samples. [More]
Rutgers awarded $2 million NIH grant to prepare students for academic research careers

Rutgers awarded $2 million NIH grant to prepare students for academic research careers

Rutgers is one of seven institutions in the country selected by the National Institutes of Health to receive this year's BEST Award - a $2 million grant designed to expose many of the university's most promising biomedical sciences graduate trainees to career opportunities that go beyond the academic path that they have traditionally taken. [More]
Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Research could help eventual treatment of degenerative muscle, brain diseases

Our genetic information is stored in DNA, tiny strands of nucleic acid that contain instructions for the functioning of our bodies. To express this genetic data, our DNA is copied into RNA molecules, which then translate the instructions into proteins that perform tasks in our cells. [More]
Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Study suggests potential treatment for cardiovascular disease in people with apoE4 gene variant

Researchers at UT-Southwestern Medical Center have found that the most common variant of the circulating protein apolipoprotein E, called apoE3, helps repair the lining of blood vessels. Individuals with another variant, called apoE4, do not get the benefit of this repair, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease. [More]
NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

The National Institutes of Health wants to make the process of finding new drugs faster and better. The effort will help all 27 of its research institutes and centers. So, the nation's medical research agency awarded Tudor Oprea, MD, PhD, a 2-year $4.9 million grant to develop a tool scientists can use to link information about drugs, diseases and genes. [More]
Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

Zebrafish may hold key to unlocking a leading cause of respiratory diseases

A small freshwater fish found in many tropical aquariums may hold the key to unlocking one of the leading causes of respiratory diseases in humans. [More]
NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system used at Leiden University to study the organisation of genomic DNA

NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system used at Leiden University to study the organisation of genomic DNA

JPK Instruments, a world-leading manufacturer of nanoanalytic instrumentation for research in life sciences and soft matter, reports on the use of the NanoTracker™ Optical Tweezers system in the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics in the Leiden Institute of Chemistry at Leiden University. [More]
Non-sodium dietary factor related to increases in systolic blood pressure than sodium intake

Non-sodium dietary factor related to increases in systolic blood pressure than sodium intake

A new study published in American Journal of Hypertension finds evidence that increased Body Mass Index, age, and non-sodium dietary factors are much more closely related to increases in systolic blood pressure than sodium intake. [More]
Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Breast milk may protect premature infants from intestinal destruction

Premature infants are at increased risk for a potentially lethal gastrointestinal disease called necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. [More]
AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

AMPK gene can slow aging process when activated remotely in key organ systems

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. [More]
Cholera against cholera: an interview with Dr Bruce Turnbull, University of Leeds

Cholera against cholera: an interview with Dr Bruce Turnbull, University of Leeds

Cholera bacteria, and other types of bacteria that cause diarrheal diseases, infect your intestines where they release AB5 protein toxins – that is they have a single toxic A-subunit that is linked to a pentamer of B-subunits that act as the delivery vehicle to transport the A-subunit into the cells. [More]
Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

Extreme environment medicine: an interview with Dr Kevin Fong, University College London

The understanding of how long-duration space flight affects the human body has come on quite considerably in recent years, and in large part, we owe that to programs of research that have taken place aboard the International Space Station and the Mir Space Station. [More]
Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Scientists apply iPS cell technology to Huntington's disease transgenic monkey model

Creating induced pluripotent stem cells or iPS cells allows researchers to establish "disease in a dish" models of conditions ranging from Alzheimer's disease to diabetes. [More]