Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

Texas Biomed scientists receive $23 million NIH grant to develop AIDS vaccine

To support a coordinated, innovative approach to the development of an AIDS vaccine, Texas Biomedical Research Institute scientists, together with a multi-institutional coalition of experts from the United States and Europe, have received a grant for $23 million from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

JAIDS presents important information to prevent HIV epidemic among transgender individuals

Programs to reduce the high risk of HIV infection among transgender people are urgently needed—but efforts are hindered by a lack of accurate information on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, and specific risk factors facing this key population. [More]
Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

Scientists undertake major biomedical research initiative to escalate problem of sepsis

A multidisciplinary team of scientists -- including two UC Santa Barbara faculty members -- is poised to undertake a major biomedical research initiative focused on the escalating problem of sepsis, the body's abnormal response to severe infections. [More]
Study offers new hope for preventing chronic lung disease in premature infants

Study offers new hope for preventing chronic lung disease in premature infants

By triggering a process called autophagy -- in which cells literally engulf their own insides --researchers from Drexel University and Yale University were able to decrease lung injury in mice that were exposed to high concentrations of oxygen. [More]
Biochemists design genetic poison pill to thwart coxsackievirus B3

Biochemists design genetic poison pill to thwart coxsackievirus B3

It has a funny name - coxsackievirus - but there's nothing funny about how this tiny germ and its close relatives sicken their hosts. [More]
Researchers succeed in activating a 'single-molecule switch'

Researchers succeed in activating a 'single-molecule switch'

Everybody knows the force that is required to activate a light switch on a wall - a finger is enough. But how much force do you need to apply if the device was dramatically reduced to the "nanoscale world", that is, how much force do you need to operate a "single-molecule switch"? This fundamental question is related not only to basic science but also to potential future applications of molecular devices. [More]
Researchers identify new mechanism by which bacteria outsmarts immune system

Researchers identify new mechanism by which bacteria outsmarts immune system

Bacteria are rapidly developing resistance mechanisms to combat even the most effective antibiotics. [More]
Moffitt researchers discover novel way to control SETDB1 protein upregulated in cancer

Moffitt researchers discover novel way to control SETDB1 protein upregulated in cancer

Cancer is a group of more than 100 different diseases. All are driven by cells and genes that escape the normal process of division and begin their own plan to replicate in the body. [More]
Researchers reveal how bacterial cell wall adapts to threatening environments

Researchers reveal how bacterial cell wall adapts to threatening environments

Researchers at Umea University in Sweden have published new findings on the adaptation of the bacterial cell wall in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. [More]
Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

Sex-related difference could have impact on treatment of metabolic diseases

In health research, most preliminary studies in animals only examine effects of drug treatment in one sex, assuming that males and females will have few differences in how a drug works. [More]
Exposure to London's 1952 smog linked to increased incidence of childhood, adult asthma

Exposure to London's 1952 smog linked to increased incidence of childhood, adult asthma

London's Great Smog of 1952 resulted in thousands of premature deaths and even more people becoming ill. [More]
Study shows twice daily exercise intervention improves bone strength in VLBW pre-term infants

Study shows twice daily exercise intervention improves bone strength in VLBW pre-term infants

Because of their low weight and premature birth, very low birth weight (VLBW) pre-term infants have lower bone mineral mass and a greater need for bone nutrients compared to most new-born infants. [More]
Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

Researchers uncover sensing mechanism of food poisoning bacteria found in shellfish

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have uncovered a mechanism that a type of pathogenic bacteria found in shellfish use to sense when they are in the human gut, where they release toxins that cause food poisoning. [More]
Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Key differences in immune response may explain young children’s proneness to infecion

Schools are commonly known as breeding grounds for viruses and bacteria, but this may not necessarily be linked to hygiene. [More]
Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, infecting almost 10 million people each year. Treating the disease can be challenging and requires a combination of multiple antibiotics delivered over several months. [More]
Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

Scientists develop light-activated injectable device to stimulate nerve cells

In the campy 1966 science fiction movie "Fantastic Voyage," scientists miniaturize a submarine with themselves inside and travel through the body of a colleague to break up a potentially fatal blood clot. Right. Micro-humans aside, imagine the inflammation that metal sub would cause. [More]
Study sheds more light on how bacteria rapidly causes infectious diseases

Study sheds more light on how bacteria rapidly causes infectious diseases

Researchers at Umea University are first to discover that bacteria can multiply disease-inducing genes which are needed to rapidly cause infection. [More]
Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

Jefferson researchers discover alternate pathway that helps heart keep pumping

About 5.7 million Americans have heart failure, half of whom will die from the disease within 5 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Virtual tissue technology helps identify new drug target to combat polycystic kidney disease

Using virtual tissue technology, researchers at Indiana University have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against polycystic kidney disease, an illness with no effective FDA-approved treatment that affects 200,000 people per year in the United States. [More]
TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

TSRI scientists identify GlyRS protein that launches cancer growth

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have identified a protein that launches cancer growth and appears to contribute to higher mortality in breast cancer patients. [More]
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