Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

UAB will compete to help lead NIH research program to study health benefits of exercise

This summer, the NIH Common Fund announced a five-year, $170 million effort to reveal — in molecular terms — how exercise delivers its many benefits throughout the body. [More]
New research shows male seahorse pregnancies are similar to human pregnancies

New research shows male seahorse pregnancies are similar to human pregnancies

Their pregnancies are carried by the males but, when it comes to breeding, seahorses have more in common with humans than previously thought, new research from the University of Sydney reveals. [More]
USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

USF, FARA to jointly host scientific symposium on Friedreich's ataxia

The University of South Florida will again bring together leading researchers and patients searching for a treatment for Friedreich's ataxia and related disorders at the seventh annual scientific symposium "Understanding Energy for A Cure." The symposium will be held 5 to 8:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 17, at the USF Marshall Student Center Ballroom, USF Cedar Circle, Tampa, FL 33620. [More]
Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Mouse study shows active ingredient in marijuana may delay rejection of incompatible organs

Here's another discovery to bolster the case for medical marijuana: New research in mice suggests that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, may delay the rejection of incompatible organs. [More]
GSA, ASHG and Gruber Foundation announce recipients of 2016 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award

GSA, ASHG and Gruber Foundation announce recipients of 2016 Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award

The Genetics Society of America (GSA), the American Society for Human Genetics (ASHG) and The Gruber Foundation are pleased to announce Maria Barna, PhD, of Stanford University; and Carolyn McBride, PhD, of Princeton University, as the 2016 recipients of the Rosalind Franklin Young Investigator Award. [More]
New $6.25 million NIH grant to help investigators launch research center to slow and stop HIV

New $6.25 million NIH grant to help investigators launch research center to slow and stop HIV

A new five-year, $6.25 million grant from the National Institutes of Health will help investigators from Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and others across the city of Chicago work together to slow and stop HIV. [More]
Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Discovery could open up door for cancer research and treatment

Florida State University researchers have taken a big step forward in the fight against cancer with a discovery that could open up the door for new research and treatment options. [More]
Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

Researchers report new breakthrough in countering deadly effects of radiation exposure

An interdisciplinary research team led by The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston reports a new breakthrough in countering the deadly effects of radiation exposure. A single injection of a regenerative peptide was shown to significantly increase survival in mice when given 24 hours after nuclear radiation exposure. [More]
MIPT scientists reveal that weak gamma radiation doses prolong life of female fruit flies

MIPT scientists reveal that weak gamma radiation doses prolong life of female fruit flies

Scientists at MIPT have revealed that weak doses of gamma radiation prolong the life of drosophila flies (fruit flies), and that the effect is stronger in females than in males. These findings could reveal the genes that enable the prolongation of life and in the future lead to the creation of a means to prevent aging in humans. [More]
UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

UC Davis researchers reveal how four proteins come together to help assemble tubulin

When they think about how cells put together the molecules that make life work, biologists have tended to think of assembly lines: Add A to B, tack on C, and so on. But the reality might be more like a molecular version of a 3-D printer, where a single mechanism assembles the molecule in one go. [More]
Researchers establish structure of important tumor-suppressing protein

Researchers establish structure of important tumor-suppressing protein

An international group of researchers led by Carnegie Mellon University physicists Mathias Lösche and Frank Heinrich have established the structure of an important tumor suppressing protein, PTEN. Their findings provide new insights into how the protein regulates cell growth and how mutations in the gene that encodes the protein can lead to cancer. [More]
PHD1 inhibition may have therapeutic potential for colorectal cancer

PHD1 inhibition may have therapeutic potential for colorectal cancer

Scientists at VIB and KU Leuven have shown that blocking the PHD1 oxygen sensor hinders the activation of p53, a transcription factor that aids colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in repairing themselves and thus resisting chemotherapy. Chemotherapy resistance remains a major clinical issue in the treatment of CRC. These findings indicate that PHD1 inhibition may have valuable therapeutic potential. The study was published in the leading medical journal EMBO Molecular Medicine, which features molecular biology-driven research. [More]
LINE-1 jumping gene unusually active in gastrointestinal cancer

LINE-1 jumping gene unusually active in gastrointestinal cancer

Results of a trio of studies done on human cancer tissue biopsies have added to growing evidence that a so-called jumping gene called LINE-1 is active during the development of many gastrointestinal cancers. [More]
IDT webinar explores effective RNAi and antisense oligo methods

IDT webinar explores effective RNAi and antisense oligo methods

Integrated DNA Technologies (IDT) will host an informative webinar, entitled ‘Knockdown of lncRNAs: exploring RNAi and antisense oligo methods’, on Tuesday, August 25, 2015. Kim Lennox, a research scientist at IDT and expert in the suppression of gene expression, will present the webinar at 9 am and 1 pm Central Standard Time. [More]
Researchers describe central role of mTOR in ageing and age-related diseases

Researchers describe central role of mTOR in ageing and age-related diseases

For some, TOR may bring to mind a Celtic mountain or perhaps an Internet privacy group. In the world of molecular biology it's a cellular pathway that's found in everything from yeast to mammals. [More]
Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists map 3-D atomic structure of protein complex that controls neurotransmitter release from brain cells

Scientists have revealed never-before-seen details of how our brain sends rapid-fire messages between its cells. They mapped the 3-D atomic structure of a two-part protein complex that controls the release of signaling chemicals, called neurotransmitters, from brain cells. Understanding how cells release those signals in less than one-thousandth of a second could help launch a new wave of research on drugs for treating brain disorders. [More]
Studies show jumping genes more active during development of gastrointestinal cancers

Studies show jumping genes more active during development of gastrointestinal cancers

Results of a trio of studies done on human cancer tissue biopsies have added to growing evidence that a so-called jumping gene called LINE-1 is active during the development of many gastrointestinal cancers. [More]
‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

‘Medical foods’ for patients with rare IEMs may cause harm when not carefully managed

Many "medical foods" are designed to help manage patients with rare inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs), and can help prevent serious and life-threatening complications. However, such special foods may cause harm in some patients when their use is not carefully monitored and managed, according to a research team led by scientists at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

Researchers elucidate mechanism that induces skeletal muscle atrophy in patients with congestive heart failure

It is a paradox: Patients with advanced congestive heart failure lose skeletal muscle mass, but their heart muscles become enlarged to provide the body with an adequate supply of blood and thus with oxygen. It has long been known that the protein angiotensin II plays a villainous role in this process, but the exact mechanism has remained unclear. [More]
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