Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Leeds scientists to start computer drug research to find cure for Ebola virus

Leeds scientists to start computer drug research to find cure for Ebola virus

Scientists at the University of Leeds will run the equivalent of password cracking software to find the chemical keys to defeating the Ebola virus. [More]
Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

Unlocking intrinsically disordered proteins: an interview with Peter Wright

I'm a professor in the Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology at The Scripps Research Institute. I have been performing NMR research on proteins for nearly 40 years. [More]
New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

New technique allows better understanding of cellular stress reaction

Stress in the body's cells is both the cause and consequence of inflammatory diseases or cancer. The cells react to stress to protect themselves. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now developed a new technique that allows studying a fundamental response to stress in much more detail than previously possible: the ADP-ribosylation of chromatin. [More]
Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

Duke researchers identify promising target for renal cell carcinomas

All cells need nutrients, but cancer cells are notoriously power hungry. As a result, cancer cells must alter their metabolism to provide the additional fuel needed for them to survive, grow and spread. [More]
New Leica Bioimaging Center for applied cell research opens in Munich

New Leica Bioimaging Center for applied cell research opens in Munich

Leica Microsystems and the Biomedical Center (BMC) of the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Munich, Germany, will inaugurate the new core facility Bioimaging. Leica Microsystems will use the facility as reference and demo center. [More]
Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Study reveals fetal origin for social and repetitive behavior deficits

Fetal development has been known to play an important role in social interaction, a fundamental behavior found in nearly all organisms, and later adult social behaviors. Autism, a highly heritable neurodevelopment disorder that causes difficulties with social interactions, has been postulated to be caused by neuron overgrowth in the prenatal period, although the precise timing and cause of this overgrowth has been unknown. [More]
Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

Research: Adenosine deaminase may help activate immune system against HIV

New research findings published in the February 2016 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, suggest that a new therapeutic strategy for HIV may already be available by repurposing an existing prescription drug. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Research offers novel insights into root causes of schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a mysterious and devastating disorder that afflicts one percent of the adult population worldwide. Its symptoms — hallucinations, emotional withdrawal, and cognitive impairment — are chronic and typically emerge just as individuals are entering adulthood. Today's medications treat just one of these symptoms (psychosis); treatments for the underlying disease and its many other symptoms have been hard to develop, because no one really understands what causes the disorder. [More]
Researchers identify cells that likely give rise to Group 4 medulloblastoma

Researchers identify cells that likely give rise to Group 4 medulloblastoma

Researchers have identified the cells that likely give rise to the brain tumor subtype Group 4 medulloblastoma. The finding removes a barrier to developing more effective targeted therapies against the brain tumor's most common subtype. [More]
Stopping disruptions in cellular 'trash removal' may guard against neurodegenerative diseases

Stopping disruptions in cellular 'trash removal' may guard against neurodegenerative diseases

Stopping disruptions in cellular "trash removal" brought on by errors in molecular marks on DNA may guard against neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's. [More]
Synaptic plasticity alterations responsible for memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

Synaptic plasticity alterations responsible for memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

Neurons communicate with one another by synaptic connections, where information is exchanged from one neuron to its neighbor. These connections are not static, but are continuously modulated in response to the ongoing activity (or experience) of the neuron. This process, known as synaptic plasticity, is a fundamental mechanism for learning and memory in humans as in all animals. [More]
Using single-molecule studies to understand cellular processes: an interview with Professor W. E. Moerner

Using single-molecule studies to understand cellular processes: an interview with Professor W. E. Moerner

Single fluorescent molecules provide a local nanometer-sized probe of complex systems. We can measure the motion of the single molecule, use them to achieve imaging on a scale down to 20 nanometers, or we can infer aspects of the behaviour of the object under study by the details of the light that is emitted. [More]
Preventing memory loss in Alzheimer's Disease, a new key mechanism

Preventing memory loss in Alzheimer's Disease, a new key mechanism

Neurons communicate with one another by synaptic connections, where information is exchanged from one neuron to its neighbor. These connections are not static, but are continuously modulated in response to the ongoing activity (or experience) of the neuron. [More]
Diet rich in fiber may reduce risk of developing lung disease

Diet rich in fiber may reduce risk of developing lung disease

A diet rich in fiber may not only protect against diabetes and heart disease, it may reduce the risk of developing lung disease, according to new research published online, ahead of print in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. [More]
Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone face increased risk of respiratory and cardiovascular deaths

Adults with long-term exposure to ozone (O3) face an increased risk of dying from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, according to the study "Long-Term Ozone Exposure and Mortality in a Large Prospective Study" published online ahead of print in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
Berlin researchers identify defects in myotubular myopathy

Berlin researchers identify defects in myotubular myopathy

Tiny deviations in the body's cells can sometimes have severe consequences. Researchers from Berlin have discovered why cells from patients suffering from the rare muscular disease myotubular myopathy cannot function properly. [More]
New study sheds light on possible role of ion channel in the immune system

New study sheds light on possible role of ion channel in the immune system

Many cells have microscopic gates, called ion channels, which open to allow the flow of ions across the cell membrane. Thanks to these gates, cells can detect stimuli such as heat, pain, pressure and even spicy food. [More]
Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen helps women fight flu virus better than men

Estrogen dramatically reduced the amount of flu virus that replicated in infected cells from women but not from men, a new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health shows. [More]
WASF3 protein appears to be solid target for reducing cancer metastasis

WASF3 protein appears to be solid target for reducing cancer metastasis

A protein that is constantly expressed by cancer cells and quiescent in healthy ones appears to be a solid target for reducing cancer's ability to spread, scientists report. [More]
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