Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Cepheid releases Xpert Flu/RSV XC for accurate determination of Flu A, Flu B and RSV infection

Cepheid releases Xpert Flu/RSV XC for accurate determination of Flu A, Flu B and RSV infection

Cepheid announced today the release of Xpert® Flu/RSV XC, an on-demand molecular test for rapid, accurate and reliable determination of Flu A, Flu B, and differentiation of RSV infection. [More]
Two fully automated molecular testing systems for blood and plasma donor screening launched by Roche

Two fully automated molecular testing systems for blood and plasma donor screening launched by Roche

Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today the commercial availability of the cobas 6800/8800 Systems, two integrated and fully automated molecular testing systems for blood and plasma donor screening, in markets accepting the CE mark. The cobas 6800/8800 Systems offer the fastest time to results with the highest throughput available, along with the longest walk-away time, enabling laboratory staff to drive increased workflow efficiencies, while adapting to their ever-changing testing demands. [More]
Gamma H2AX Pharmacodynamic assay kit for the study of double strand DNA breaks announced by AMSBIO

Gamma H2AX Pharmacodynamic assay kit for the study of double strand DNA breaks announced by AMSBIO

AMSBIO announces the first commercially available gamma H2AX Pharmacodynamic assay kit for the study of double strand DNA breaks through the detection of gamma H2AX - a phosphorylated histone historically proven as a highly specific and sensitive molecular marker for double strand DNA damage detection. This new assay has been developed for anti-cancer drug screening, basic research and upcoming clinical trials providing one of many needed tools to support hypothesis-driven drug design strategies. [More]
Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

Internal production of hydrogen peroxide can lead cells to exit cell cycle and become senescent

What happens inside cells when they detect the activation of a cancer-inducing gene? Sometimes, cells are able to signal internally to stop the cell cycle. Such cells are able to enter, at least for a time, a protective non-growth state. [More]
UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern faculty awarded CPRIT grants to combat cancer

UT Southwestern Medical Center faculty have received 19 grants totaling more than $26 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas to expand cancer screenings, investigate the effectiveness and viability for cancer therapies and radiation treatments, conduct research into cancer biology, and recruitment. [More]
Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

Freiburg biochemists discover new mechanisms of brain disease

The failing in the work of nerve cells: An international team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Chris Meisinger from the Institute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of the University of Freiburg has discovered how Alzheimer's disease damages mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell. [More]
Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

Changes in ADNP gene may provide further insight into causes of autism

A new study from Bradley Hospital has identified a genetic change in a recently identified autism-associated gene, which may provide further insight into the causes of autism. The study, now published online in the Journal of Medical Genetics, presents findings that likely represent a definitive clinical marker for some patients' developmental disabilities. [More]
Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Contaminated blood cultures can serve as diagnostic predictor for more targeted antibiotics

Some 30 percent of all positive hospital blood culture samples are discarded every day because they're "contaminated" - they reflect the presence of skin germs instead of specific disease-causing bacteria. [More]
Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Researchers reveal how Listeria is able to survive antibiotics

Listeria is a dreaded bacterium that can be found in both unprocessed and processed foods. Over the last few weeks, 28 persons in Denmark have been infected with Listeria from processed food, sold in supermarkets. 13 have died. [More]
Antibody-Drug Conjugate analysis capabilities to be advanced through collaboration between AB SCIEX and Dalton

Antibody-Drug Conjugate analysis capabilities to be advanced through collaboration between AB SCIEX and Dalton

AB SCIEX and Dalton Pharma Services (Dalton) announced today a research collaboration to develop Antibody-Drug Conjugate (ADC) analysis capabilities. This will include development of more definitive and comprehensive methods for the identification of drug loading and position of conjugation on macromolecules. This collaboration is part of AB SCIEX's commitment to support the growing movement to bring targeted antibody-based therapies to market. [More]
Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

Understanding neuron development: an interview with Dr. Brock Grill, The Scripps Research Institute

There’s a big difference between understanding coordination and actually building connectivity. In terms of building connectivity, several molecules have been identified that control this process and a lot has been learned from both genetic and biochemical research in a variety of different systems, particularly studies in the nematode C. elegans, the fruit fly Drosophila and mice. [More]
Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Three commonly used NSAIDs affect cell membranes, produce unwanted side effects

Researchers have discovered that three commonly used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs, alter the activity of enzymes within cell membranes. Their finding suggests that, if taken at higher-than-approved doses and/or for long periods of time, these prescription-level NSAIDs and other drugs that affect the membrane may produce wide-ranging and unwanted side effects. [More]
Analysis of Candida glabrata fungus mutations reveals new genes that confer anti-fungal tolerance

Analysis of Candida glabrata fungus mutations reveals new genes that confer anti-fungal tolerance

A group of researchers at the Max F. Perutz Laboratories has created one of the three world's largest gene libraries for the Candida glabrata yeast, which is harmful to humans. [More]
Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Researchers identify microRNAs that differentiate male and female fruit flies

Men and women differ in plenty of obvious ways, and scientists have long known that genetic differences buried deep within our DNA underlie these distinctions. In the past, most research has focused on understanding how the genes that encode proteins act as sex determinants. [More]
Scientists develop algorithm to uncover genomic insertions and deletions involved in autism, OCD

Scientists develop algorithm to uncover genomic insertions and deletions involved in autism, OCD

With three billion letters in the human genome, it seems hard to believe that adding a DNA base here or removing a DNA base there could have much of an effect on our health. [More]
Researchers use new gene editing method to correct mutation that leads to DMD

Researchers use new gene editing method to correct mutation that leads to DMD

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers successfully used a new gene editing method to correct the mutation that leads to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in a mouse model of the condition. [More]
Anti-EphA3 antibody has anti-tumour effects against solid cancers

Anti-EphA3 antibody has anti-tumour effects against solid cancers

An international team of scientists has shown that an antibody against the protein EphA3, found in the micro-environment of solid cancers, has anti-tumour effects. [More]
Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Researchers now have a clear picture of bacterial immune system

Bacteria's ability to destroy viruses has long puzzled scientists, but researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health say they now have a clear picture of the bacterial immune system and say its unique shape is likely why bacteria can so quickly recognize and destroy their assailants. [More]
AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

AEG-1 protein blocks effects of retinoic acid in leukemia and liver cancer

Retinoic acid is a form of vitamin A that is used to treat and help prevent the recurrence of a variety of cancers, but for some patients the drug is not effective. [More]
Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

Ebola virus defeats attempts by interferon to block viral reproduction in infected cells

One of the human body's first responses to a viral infection is to make and release signaling proteins called interferons, which amplify the immune system response to viruses. [More]