Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

MMP-3 disrupts brain/spinal cord barrier, promotes hemorrhage

Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition with few treatment options. Studies show that damage to the barrier separating blood from the spinal cord can contribute to the neurologic deficits that arise secondary to the initial trauma. Through a series of sophisticated experiments, researchers reporting in The American Journal of Pathology suggest that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) plays a pivotal role in disruption of the brain/spinal cord barrier (BSCB), cell death, and functional deficits after SCI. [More]
Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

Discovery offers insight on early stages of cancer

The discovery of a cellular snooze button has allowed a team of Michigan State University scientists to potentially improve biofuel production and offer insight on the early stages of cancer. [More]
MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

MGH, MIT partner to accelerate development of diagnostic tools and therapies

A novel partnership between Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology is addressing three major challenges in clinical medicine – improving the diagnosis of disease, developing new approaches to prevent and treat infectious and autoimmune diseases, and developing more accurate methods of diagnosing and treating major neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. While individual collaborations between MGH and MIT investigators are nothing new, this formalized strategic partnership is designed to accelerate the development of diagnostic tools and therapies. [More]
Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Caregivers more aware of SUDEP than patients

Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is concerning and many—even those with seizure disorders—may not be aware of this condition. New research published in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley on behalf of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE), reports that 76% of caregivers are more likely to have heard of SUDEP compared with 65% of patients with epilepsy. [More]
Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

Researchers discover new kind of stem cell that may hold clues to origins of liver cancer

A Mount Sinai-led research team has discovered a new kind of stem cell that can become either a liver cell or a cell that lines liver blood vessels, according to a study published today in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The existence of such a cell type contradicts current theory on how organs arise from cell layers in the embryo, and may hold clues to origins of, and future treatment for, liver cancer. [More]
Penn State scientists find that mitochondrial disease more prevalent in older moms

Penn State scientists find that mitochondrial disease more prevalent in older moms

The discovery of a "maternal age effect" by a team of Penn State scientists that could be used to predict the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in maternal egg cells -- and the transmission of these mutations to children -- could provide valuable insights for genetic counseling. [More]
Molecular diagnostics and blood screening systems: an interview with Dr Bos and Dr Koppelman

Molecular diagnostics and blood screening systems: an interview with Dr Bos and Dr Koppelman

Screening blood donations and molecular diagnostics for patients started in the nineties. At the beginning, the level of automation in molecular diagnostic testing was limited; most of the work had to be done manually. [More]
Study can help breeders improve health-related traits in cultivated tomatoes

Study can help breeders improve health-related traits in cultivated tomatoes

Tomatoes are known to be rich in antioxidants such as vitamin C, lycopene, β-carotene, and phenolics. Antioxidants, substances capable of delaying or inhibiting oxidation processes caused by free radicals, are of interest to consumers for their health-related contributions, and to plant breeders for their ability to provide plants with natural resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses. [More]
Study shows rats, mice perform similarly in cognitive tests; offers implications for cognition research

Study shows rats, mice perform similarly in cognitive tests; offers implications for cognition research

It's one of those ideas that seems to make perfect sense: the bigger the brain, the more intelligent the creature. [More]
New study reveals mechanism that compromises chromosome stability

New study reveals mechanism that compromises chromosome stability

During cell division, chromosomes acquire a characteristic X-shape with the two DNA molecules (sister chromatids) linked at a central "connection region" that contains highly compacted DNA. [More]
Research finding could potentially lead to new strategies to improve cancer therapies

Research finding could potentially lead to new strategies to improve cancer therapies

Cells are generally able to repair spontaneous damage that arises in their genetic material. Unfortunately, the DNA repair process is not perfect and sometimes, damaged DNA gets passed on to newly made cells. A team of researchers at the Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University has recently discovered that in yeast cells, the amount of nutrients that cells are exposed to can affect DNA surveillance and repair mechanisms and therefore the quality of their DNA. [More]
'Achilles heel' in metabolic pathway could stop growth of lung cancer cells

'Achilles heel' in metabolic pathway could stop growth of lung cancer cells

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found an "Achilles heel" in a metabolic pathway crucial to stopping the growth of lung cancer cells. [More]
Eppendorf’s new Mastercycler® nexus X2 provides a multi-block solution for simultaneous PCR runs

Eppendorf’s new Mastercycler® nexus X2 provides a multi-block solution for simultaneous PCR runs

Eppendorf has launched the latest offering in its range of molecular biology instruments. The new Mastercycler nexus X2 is ideal for researchers looking to carry out two PCR reactions simultaneously, without any compromise on the number of samples. The instrument comprises of two asymmetric blocks, consisting of 64 and 32 wells, which can be programmed and run completely independently, enabling two separate PCR protocols to be run in parallel. [More]
New England Biolabs inks deal to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies

New England Biolabs inks deal to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies

New England Biolabs, Inc. (NEB®) has strengthened its position as a key supplier to the fast-growing RNA synthesis market by signing an agreement to supply critical reagents to TriLink BioTechnologies, Inc., a leading manufacturer of mRNA and long RNA for research, diagnostic and therapeutic applications. [More]
U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

Deep in the brains of the million Americans with Parkinson's disease, changes to their brain cells put them at high risk of dangerous falls -- a problem that resists even the most modern treatments. [More]
Vesicles play significant role in the functioning of neurons

Vesicles play significant role in the functioning of neurons

Tiny vesicles containing protective substances which they transmit to nerve cells apparently play an important role in the functioning of neurons. As cell biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have discovered, nerve cells can enlist the aid of mini-vesicles of neighboring glial cells to defend themselves against stress and other potentially detrimental factors. [More]

2014 Norman R. Alpert Award winner announced

Dr. Chris Berger, CMB Interim Director and Director of Graduate Education for the College of Medicine, announced the winner of the 2014 Norman R. Alpert Award at the annual Graduate Research Day for the CMB Program event held October 2, 2014. Jacqueline Leung, a graduate student in the Cellular, Molecular and Biosciences (CMB) Program at the University of Vermont won for her publication, “Identification of T. gondii Myosin Light Chain-1 as a Direct Target of TachypleginA-2, a Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Parasite Motility and Invasion.”1 [More]
Scientists show how BRCA2 protein works to repair damaged DNA

Scientists show how BRCA2 protein works to repair damaged DNA

Scientists have taken pictures of the BRCA2 protein for the first time, showing how it works to repair damaged DNA. [More]
IRCM researchers discover mechanism that promotes progression of medulloblastoma

IRCM researchers discover mechanism that promotes progression of medulloblastoma

Scientists at the IRCM discovered a mechanism that promotes the progression of medulloblastoma, the most common brain tumour found in children. The team, led by Fr-d-ric Charron, PhD, found that a protein known as Sonic Hedgehog induces DNA damage, which causes the cancer to develop. [More]
Genoscience Pharma to present novel cancer therapeutic strategy at EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium

Genoscience Pharma to present novel cancer therapeutic strategy at EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium

Genoscience Pharma, a company focused on discovering and developing small molecules to treat cancer by targeting cancer stem cells, today announces that it will present data on its most promising candidate at the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, in Barcelona, Spain, on November 18-21, 2014. [More]