Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid, FIND unveil new portable molecular diagnostics system for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola

Cepheid and FIND today unveiled the GeneXpert Omni, the world's most portable molecular diagnostics system enabling unprecedented access to accurate, fast and potentially life-saving diagnosis for patients suspected of TB, HIV and Ebola in even the most remote areas of the world. [More]
IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

IU awarded $4.5 million NIH grant to create new federally designated diabetes research center

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Indiana University School of Medicine a five-year, $4.5 million grant to create a new federally designated Indiana Diabetes Research Center, one of just 16 such centers in the country. [More]
Detailed, 3D image of malaria protein could help develop new antimalarial drugs

Detailed, 3D image of malaria protein could help develop new antimalarial drugs

The first three-dimensional image capturing a critical malaria 'conductor' protein could lead to the development of a new class of antimalarial drugs. [More]
Research sheds light on new therapeutic options for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

Research sheds light on new therapeutic options for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

In industrialized countries like in Europe, acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common form of cancer in children. An international research consortium lead by pediatric oncologists from the Universities of Zurich and Hannover has now succeeded in decoding a specific form of this leukemia, which is regarded as incurable, and in obtaining insights for new therapeutic possibilities. [More]
New findings unlock clues to disease protection

New findings unlock clues to disease protection

When disease-resistant rice is invaded by disease-causing bacteria, a small protein produced by the bacteria betrays the invader. Upon recognizing that protein, the rice plants sense that a microbial attack is underway and are able to mount an immune response to fend off bacterial infection, reports a research team led by the University of California, Davis. [More]
New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

New Histone Antibody Specificity Database allows scientists to find right antibodies for biomedical research

For years, a crisis has been brewing in molecular biology. The problem is that antibodies--research tools used to identify key proteins at work in a cell--aren't always what they seem. Unreliable antibodies have led to numerous instances of false findings, failed experiments, and wasted money and samples. [More]
New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

New interactive tool helps researchers explore genetic underpinnings of cancer

Brown University computer scientists have developed a new interactive tool to help researchers and clinicians explore the genetic underpinnings of cancer. [More]
Biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the body's cellular switchboard

Biomedical breakthrough reveals never-before-seen details of the body's cellular switchboard

A biomedical breakthrough, published today in the journal Nature, reveals never-before-seen details of the human body's cellular switchboard that regulates sensory and hormonal responses. The work is based on an X-ray laser experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. [More]
New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. [More]
MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington D.C., MetLife Foundation presented its annual MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research. These awards were presented to Randall Bateman, M.D., and Christian Haass, Ph.D., for their contributions in advancing Alzheimer's disease research. [More]
NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

NDSU assistant professor receives NIH grant to study regulation of transporters in Gram-negative bacteria

Christopher Colbert, assistant professor of biochemistry at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $348,000 grant award from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on structure-function relationships of iron transport and transcriptional regulation in Gram-negative bacteria. [More]
Genes affect person's perception of sweet taste

Genes affect person's perception of sweet taste

A new study from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions suggests that a single set of genes affects a person's perception of sweet taste, regardless of whether the sweetener is a natural sugar or a non-caloric sugar substitute. [More]
Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may have specific genetic risk factors that put them at higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published recently in Molecular Aspects of Medicine. [More]
Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

Canadian researchers discover how HIV evades the body's antiviral responses

A Canadian research team at the IRCM in Montreal, led by molecular virologist Eric A. Cohen, PhD, made a significant discovery on how HIV escapes the body's antiviral responses. The team uncovered how an HIV viral protein known as Vpu tricks the immune system by using its own regulatory process to evade the host's first line of defence. [More]
Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Various freshwater sources in Georgia pose possible risk for salmonella infections

Researchers from the University of Georgia have determined that various freshwater sources in Georgia, such as rivers and lakes, could feature levels of salmonella that pose a risk to humans. [More]
Rubicon Genomics completes $2 million growth capital financing

Rubicon Genomics completes $2 million growth capital financing

Rubicon Genomics, Inc., a provider of innovative pre-analytical reagent kits to improve the performance of genomic analytical platforms and enable the use of liquid biopsies, today announced that it has completed a $2 million growth capital financing. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New understanding of keratin 17 protein could lead to development of better ways to prevent cancer

New research from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests that the protein keratin 17 - the presence of which is used in the lab to detect and stage various types of cancers - is not just a biomarker for the disease, but may play a critical role in tumor growth. [More]
UM researchers discover new gene behind neurodegenerative conditions

UM researchers discover new gene behind neurodegenerative conditions

Researchers at the University of Miami have discovered and characterized a previously unknown disease gene linked to the degeneration of optic and peripheral nerve fibers. The study titled "Mutations in SLC25A46, encoding a UGO1-like protein, cause an optic atrophy spectrum disorder" is published in the journal Nature Genetics. [More]
BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

BP levels declined among US children and adolescents during the past decade

Childhood high blood pressure (HBP) is a serious public health challenge worldwide due to associated increases in risk of end organ damages and correlation with HBP in adulthood. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure (BP) has been reported to increase significantly among United States children and adolescents from 1988-1994 to 1999-2008, but little is known about recent trends in BP values and elevated BP. [More]
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