Molecular Biology News and Research RSS Feed - Molecular Biology News and Research

Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. The field overlaps with other areas of biology and chemistry, particularly genetics and biochemistry. Molecular biology chiefly concerns itself with understanding the interactions between the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA and protein biosynthesis as well as learning how these interactions are regulated.
Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Excess fat in lungs may cause pulmonary fibrosis

Pulmonary fibrosis has no cure. It's caused by scarring that seems to feed on itself, with the tougher, less elastic tissue replacing the ever moving and stretching lung, making it increasingly difficult for patients to breathe. [More]
New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

New research may help develop drug for celiac disease

Celiac disease patients suffer from gluten intolerance and must adjust to a life without gluten from food sources like wheat, rye and barley. [More]
Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms that drive ferroptosis signaling

Ferroptosis is a recently recognized form of regulated necrosis. Up until now, this form of cell death has only been thought to be a possible therapeutic approach to treat tumour cells. Yet, ferroptosis also occurs in non-transformed tissues as demonstrated by this study, thus implicating this cell death pathway in the development of a wide range of pathological conditions. More specifically, the deletion of the ferroptosis-regulating enzyme Gpx4 in a pre-clinical model results in high ferroptosis rates in kidney tubular epithelial cells causing acute renal failure. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

UT Southwestern researchers identify new gene mutations involved in certain kidney cancers

Using next generation gene sequencing techniques, cancer researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified more than 3,000 new mutations involved in certain kidney cancers, findings that help explain the diversity of cancer behaviors. [More]
Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Cholesterol-fighting statins inhibit uterine fibroid tumors that account for 50% of hysterectomies

Researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, in collaboration with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Baylor College of Medicine and the Georgia Regents University, report for the first time that the cholesterol-lowering drug simvastatin inhibits the growth of human uterine fibroid tumors. [More]
Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine researchers discovered a unique approach to treating pancreatic cancer that may be potentially safe and effective. The treatment method involves immunochemotherapy - a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which uses the patient's own immune system to help fight against disease. [More]
Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

Funding makes next-generation scientific equipment available to CBC research community

The Chicago Biomedical Consortium is announcing a $3 million Infrastructure Initiative to promote investment in high-impact, next-generation scientific equipment at its member universities. The Initiative aims to make modern and powerful tools available to the CBC research community at a time when federal grants for scientific infrastructure are scarce. [More]
Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Stopping the death of synapses: an interview with Dr Soledad Galli

Synapses are the sites that connect neurons – sites where information is passed from one neuron to another. They are highly specialized structures and synaptic function is crucial for normal brain function. [More]
Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

While oxygen is essential to our planet's life force and the way we function and stay healthy, high concentrations referred to as oxidative stress may very well be the cause of more than 70 widely-spread diseases such as cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and eye diseases including macular degeneration. [More]

AB SCIEX introduces DiscoveryQuant 3.0 Software for high throughput pharmaceutical laboratories

AB SCIEX, a global leader in life science analytical technologies, today introduced DiscoveryQuant 3.0 Software, a new version of its proven ADME software that enables scientists to significantly reduce LC/MS method development and optimization time for high throughput drug discovery (ADME) laboratories focusing on both small molecules and biotherapeutics. [More]
IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a small protein with a big role in lowering plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity. [More]
Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Effects of unhealthy lifestyle persist even after atherosclerosis treatment

Almost everyone knows that improving your eating habits will most likely improve your health. What most people may not know, however, is that the effects of poor eating habits persist long after dietary habits are improved. In a new report appearing in the November 2014 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology, scientists use mice to show that even after successful treatment of atherosclerosis (including lowering of blood cholesterol and a change in dietary habits) the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle still affect the way the immune system functions. [More]
MO BIO Laboratories announces launch of PowerMag Blood DNA/RNA Isolation Kit

MO BIO Laboratories announces launch of PowerMag Blood DNA/RNA Isolation Kit

MO BIO Laboratories, Inc., the leader in soil, stool and microbial nucleic acid purification, announces the launch of the PowerMag Blood DNA/RNA Isolation Kit. The kit is designed for automated, hands-free purification of nucleic acids from blood samples using the Thermo Scientific KingFisher automated processing system and other similar automation platforms. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Aquila-Histoplex, a contract research organisation specialised in histological and multiplex staining technologies, was today announced as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe by Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD), a technology and market leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools. [More]
Scientists obtain first structure of the immature form of HIV

Scientists obtain first structure of the immature form of HIV

Scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, Germany and collaborators from Heidelberg University, in the joint Molecular Medicine Partnership Unit, have obtained the first structure of the immature form of HIV at a high enough resolution to pinpoint exactly where each building block sits in the virus. [More]
Einstein-Montefiore researchers to present latest finding on aging research at GSA 2014

Einstein-Montefiore researchers to present latest finding on aging research at GSA 2014

Investigators at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center will present their latest aging research at the Gerontological Society of America's 67th Annual Scientific Meeting. [More]
New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

New blood test could predict early onset Alzheimer’s disease with high accuracy

The research team previously identified that changes in the brain occur two decades before patients show signs of dementia. These changes can be detected through expensive brain imaging procedures. [More]
Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

Landmark study provides new insight into function of enzyme related to BRCA1 protein

A landmark study to be published in the October 30, 2014 print edition of the journal Nature provides new insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein. The study by a team at Penn State University is the first to produce a detailed working image of an enzyme in the Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) -- a group that regulates cell development and is associated with many types of cancer. [More]
UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to simple saliva test for early diagnosis of deadly diseases

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases. [More]
Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Study sheds light on the mystery of biological clock that controls fertility in women

Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have identified the biological clock that governs female fertility. The discovery represents a major contribution to research aimed at finding medical approaches to treating infertility in women. [More]