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Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Small lipid nanocarrier may deliver chemotherapeutic drug more efficiently to brain tumor cells

Great discoveries do come in small packages. Few know that better than Ann-Marie Broome, Ph.D., who feels nanotechnology holds the future of medicine with its ability to deliver powerful drugs in tiny, designer packages. [More]
Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical signs exclusive global license agreement with UA for Beta Emission Tomography

Lightpoint Medical, a clinical-stage medical device company developing advanced imaging technologies for intraoperative cancer detection, announced today that the company has signed an exclusive global license agreement for a molecular imaging technology called Beta Emission Tomography, developed by Professor Harrison Barrett, Regents Professor of Radiology and Optical Science, with his student Yijun Ding and colleague Dr. Luca Caucci at the University of Arizona Center for Gamma Ray Imaging. [More]
‘Together we are stronger’ - partnership at the heart of expansion plans to revolutionise medical imaging services

‘Together we are stronger’ - partnership at the heart of expansion plans to revolutionise medical imaging services

A number of sites across West Birmingham and Sandwell, including the new multi-million pound Midland Metropolitan Hospital opening in October 2018, are set to transform patient care for up to 530,000 people in the area. [More]
Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans more effective than current imaging standard for detecting NETS

Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans more effective than current imaging standard for detecting NETS

A recent study reported in the May issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrates that Ga-68 DOTATATE PET/CT scans are superior to In-111 pentetreotide scans, the current imaging standard in the United States for detecting neuroendocrine tumors, and could significantly impact treatment management. [More]
Snapshots of NMDA receptor activation may help in novel drug design

Snapshots of NMDA receptor activation may help in novel drug design

Structural biologists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Janelia Research Campus/HHMI, have obtained snapshots of the activation of an important type of brain-cell receptor. Dysfunction of the receptor has been implicated in a range of neurological illnesses, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, seizure, schizophrenia, autism, and injuries related to stroke. [More]
Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

Cubresa's new NuPET scanner enables simultaneous PET/MRI in existing third-party MRI systems

A compact PET scanner called NuPET has been commercially released for simultaneous preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) in existing third-party MRI systems. [More]
Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

Innovations in pre-clinical MRI: an interview with Priv. Doz. Dr. Dominik von Elverfeldt

To me the most exciting aspect of pre-clinical imaging is its broad range, from very basic science up to applied science. You deal with a range of disciplines including biology, chemistry, physics, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology and of course medicine, as the aim is the translation of research to humans. [More]
Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Transforming MR images into body composition measurements: an interview with Olof Leinhard

Today's medical science utilizes relatively simple anthropometric measures that describe the body, such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference. All of these measures are approximations of the body with the intention to characterize what's inside reflecting underlying phenomena that underpin the risk for different diseases. [More]
Scientists discover Hobit, Blimp1 genes that fight disease-causing pathogens

Scientists discover Hobit, Blimp1 genes that fight disease-causing pathogens

Melbourne researchers have uncovered the genes responsible for the way the body fights infection at the point of 'invasion' - whether it's the skin, liver, lungs or the gut. [More]
Researchers examine neuropsychological effect in ecstasy users

Researchers examine neuropsychological effect in ecstasy users

Researchers from the University of Liverpool have conducted a study examining the effect ecstasy has on different parts of the brain. [More]
Structure of fibril protein could lead to specific targets for diagnosis, treatment of Parkinson's disease

Structure of fibril protein could lead to specific targets for diagnosis, treatment of Parkinson's disease

Chemists have identified the complex chemical structure of the protein that stacks together to form fibrils in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients. Armed with this knowledge, researchers can identify specific targets for diagnosis and treatment. [More]
Doctors now have better tool to assess individual kidney function

Doctors now have better tool to assess individual kidney function

Doctors now have a much-improved tool to assess individual kidney function, thanks to the work of an international team led by University of Saskatchewan medical imaging specialists Drs. Carl and Michal Wesolowski. [More]
Distinct brain networks support retrieval of old and recent memories

Distinct brain networks support retrieval of old and recent memories

When we remember events which occurred recently, the hippocampus is activated. This area in the temporal lobe of the brain is a hub for learning and memory. But what happens, if we try to remember things that took place years or decades ago? Neuroscientists at the Ruhr-University Bochum and the Osaka University have been able to give some answers to this question. [More]
Oral pill could improve breast cancer diagnostic techniques

Oral pill could improve breast cancer diagnostic techniques

The ongoing debate about breast cancer diagnostics has left many women confused — particularly over what age they should get mammograms and who needs treatment. An issue with current methods is that they often identify lumps but cannot conclusively pinpoint which ones are cancerous. To help resolve this uncertainty, researchers have developed a pill that could improve imaging techniques so that only cancerous tumors light up. [More]
Renishaw inVia to support development of nanomolecular probes in Kircher Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering

Renishaw inVia to support development of nanomolecular probes in Kircher Laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering

The Kircher laboratory at Memorial Sloan Kettering is developing novel nanoprobes for molecular imaging, image-guided therapy and theranostics. [More]
Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

Advances in the field of MPI: an interview with Professor Kannan Krishnan

In around 2004, there was a Phillips paper that discussed a new imaging technique called MPI. At that time, I had an eager, promising graduate student named Matt Ferguson who wanted a project, so I asked him to take a look. [More]
MR Solutions introduces new 3D in vivo confocal microscope for preclinical research

MR Solutions introduces new 3D in vivo confocal microscope for preclinical research

MR Solutions’ new 3D in vivo confocal microscope for use in preclinical research provides a magnification range of up to 1000 times, allowing researchers to examine cellular details within a live small animal eliminating the need for a surgical biopsy - saving time and substantially reducing costs. [More]
Intracellular process of autophagy plays role in prostate cancer development, shows research

Intracellular process of autophagy plays role in prostate cancer development, shows research

Research from investigators at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center, shows the intracellular process of autophagy plays a role in the development of prostate cancer. [More]
Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

Molecular imaging and radiochemistry: the importance of instrumentation. An interview with Professor Björn Wängler

I’m Björn Wängler, Professor for Molecular Imaging and Radiochemistry at the medical faculty Mannheim of Heidelberg University. I’m a radiopharmaceutical chemist by background and completed my PhD in 2004 at the University of Mainz. [More]
A more effective method for detecting metastatic prostate cancer

A more effective method for detecting metastatic prostate cancer

Conventional imaging methods have limited sensitivity for detecting metastatic prostate cancer. With appropriate, timely treatment vital to survival and quality of life, better imaging has been an ongoing goal. [More]
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