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Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Could a light-listening photonics device detect skin disease? An interview with Prof. Vasilis Ntziachristos

Detection of malignant skin alterations is currently aided by optical microscopes such as dermoscopes or optical microscopes. While the latter offers high resolution, it comes with a major disadvantage, just like any other purely microscopic method: it only provides a partial view of the skin due to the low penetration depth. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Determining whether breast cancer has spread to sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) is key to prognosis and treatment, making SLN mapping critical. [More]
MILabs to provide new hybrid imaging system to Yale for advancing cardiovascular research

MILabs to provide new hybrid imaging system to Yale for advancing cardiovascular research

MILabs will provide an advanced U-SPECT4CT system to the Yale Translational Research Imaging Center (Y-TRIC) in New Haven-Connecticut, with support of an NIH Shared Instrument Grant for advancing their program in multimodality molecular and translational cardiovascular imaging research. [More]
Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Could nanotechnology turn the cancer cell suicide switch back on? An interview with Professor Dipanjan Pan

Before I explain the discovery, I would take a step back and explain an interesting event that takes place in the cancer cells. Normal cells follow a rapid and irreversible process to efficiently eradicate dysfunctional cells. This is a natural process by which damaged cells commit ‘suicide’. This process is known as apoptosis or programmed cell death. [More]
Researchers develop method to kill cancer cells using nanoparticles and lasers

Researchers develop method to kill cancer cells using nanoparticles and lasers

Cancer treatments based on laser irridation of tiny nanoparticles that are injected directly into the cancer tumor are working and can destroy the cancer from within. [More]
Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Experts recommend several measures to reduce firearm suicide rates in the U.S.

Researchers from Columbia University Medical Center nd New York State Psychiatric Institute have found that legislation reducing access to firearms has lowered firearm suicide rates in other countries. [More]
Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Researchers develop new approach for visualizing oxygen in tissue

Learning how to look inside a body without having to cut it open is still an important part of medical research. One of the great challenges in imaging remains the visualization of oxygen in tissue. [More]
Bad diet can affect immune system prior to weight gain, new research shows

Bad diet can affect immune system prior to weight gain, new research shows

Australian researchers have discovered that a bad diet has consequences on your immune system even before you notice an increase in body weight. [More]
New molecular breast imaging gives better image quality with reduced radiation dose

New molecular breast imaging gives better image quality with reduced radiation dose

Preliminary tests have demonstrated that a new device may enable existing breast cancer imagers to provide up to six times better contrast of tumors in the breast, while maintaining the same or better image quality and halving the radiation dose to patients. [More]
New, portable molecular imaging system combines optical imaging and scintigraphy

New, portable molecular imaging system combines optical imaging and scintigraphy

Bigger isn't always better, especially when it comes to a new and surprisingly portable molecular imaging system that combines optical imaging at the surface level and scintigraphy, which captures the physiological function of what lies beneath, announced developers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
CT-derived SULps can improve accuracy of PET imaging in advanced cancer patients

CT-derived SULps can improve accuracy of PET imaging in advanced cancer patients

Cancer patients often experience significant fluctuations in weight and lean body mass (LBM). Neglecting to account for these changes can prevent clinicians from obtaining precise data from molecular imaging, but a new method of measuring LBM takes changes in individual body composition into account for better staging of disease and therapy monitoring, say researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

FDG-PET imaging tracks ability of atezolizumab to bolster immunity against NSCLC

Non-small cell lung cancers have a collective reputation for not responding very well to chemotherapy. Researchers at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) are presenting a means of evaluating an immunotherapy that fights off NSCLC by strengthening a patient's own immune system. [More]
Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Molecular imaging technique could help optimize radiotherapy dose to combat NETs

Aggressive neuroendocrine cancer is something of a dark horse--a rare, elusive and persevering force linked to discouraging long-term survival rates. [More]
New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

New imaging study links tau proteins to neurodegenerative pathology of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's is a devastating and incurable disease marked by beta-amyloid and tau protein aggregations in the brain, yet the direct relationship between these proteins and neurodegeneration has remained a mystery. [More]
Genetic blood test can help predict patient’s respone to neuroendocrine cancer therapy

Genetic blood test can help predict patient’s respone to neuroendocrine cancer therapy

Malignant neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are relatively rare, notoriously difficult to treat, and associated with poor long-term survival. According to research presented at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, an investigative blood test could predict how patients will respond to peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) before they commit to a course of treatment. [More]
PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

PET imaging can help identify autoimmune inflammation in MS

The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. [More]
PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

PET/CT imaging technique may provide way to break perpetual cycle of alcohol abuse

Alcoholism is a devastating disorder that too often leads to a perpetual cycle of abuse. An emerging molecular imaging technique may provide a way to break that cycle. [More]
Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

Novel radioimmunotherapy may help cure colorectal cancer

An emerging cancer therapy has colorectal tumors surrounded. Presenters at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging are unveiling a novel radioimmunotherapy that combines a cancer-seeking antibody with potent radionuclide agents, resulting in complete remission of colorectal cancer in mouse models. [More]
NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

NaF-PET/CT scans can accurately detect bone metastases in advanced prostate cancer patients

A recent pilot study reported in the June issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine found that sodium fluoride (Na-F-18) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (NaF-PET/CT) accurately detects bone metastases in patients with advanced prostate cancer, and follow-up scans over time correlate clearly with clinical outcomes and patient survival. [More]
University of Arizona selects Cubresa’s NuPET scanner for cancer research

University of Arizona selects Cubresa’s NuPET scanner for cancer research

Cubresa Inc., a medical imaging company that develops and markets molecular imaging systems, today announced that their compact PET scanner called NuPET™ for simultaneous preclinical PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) has been selected by the University of Arizona (UA). [More]
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