Mononucleosis News and Research RSS Feed - Mononucleosis News and Research

Interactions with other infections can trigger herpes virus to reactivate, shows research

Interactions with other infections can trigger herpes virus to reactivate, shows research

The famous slogan is "A diamond is forever," but that phrase might be better suited to herpes: Unlike most viruses, which succumb to the immune system's attack, herpes remains in the body forever, lying in wait, sometimes reactivating years later. [More]
High dose vitamin C therapy may have positive effect on Epstein-Barr virus infection

High dose vitamin C therapy may have positive effect on Epstein-Barr virus infection

The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a member of the herpes family that targets lymphocytes and epithelial cells. While the infection is usually benign, it can in some cases lead to acute infectious mononucleosis and can impair the immune system. EBV is also linked to several malignancies. There is currently no cure for removing EBV infections and very little success treating acute EBV infection and mononucleosis with drugs. [More]
Researchers discover how of EBV virus takes over human cells gene regulating machinery

Researchers discover how of EBV virus takes over human cells gene regulating machinery

University of Montreal researchers have discovered how a component of the Epstein Barr (EBV) virus takes over our cells gene regulating machinery, allowing the virus to replicate itself. [More]
University of Montreal scientists discover molecular details of kissing disease virus attacks

University of Montreal scientists discover molecular details of kissing disease virus attacks

University of Montreal researchers have discovered how a component of the Epstein Barr (EBV) virus takes over our cells gene regulating machinery, allowing the virus to replicate itself. [More]
Study shows critical role of immune system in protecting against viruses and cancer cells

Study shows critical role of immune system in protecting against viruses and cancer cells

​A team of researchers at the IRCM, led by Andr- Veillette, MD, explains how our immune system kills abnormal blood cells. Their discovery, recently published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, could eventually lead to new treatment avenues for leukemia, lymphoma and certain types of infectious viral diseases. [More]
Researchers discover how STAT3 protein breaches antitumor mechanism prior to cancer development

Researchers discover how STAT3 protein breaches antitumor mechanism prior to cancer development

A Stony Brook University-led international team of infectious disease researchers have discovered how a cellular protein, called STAT3, which is overactive in a majority of human cancers, interferes with an antitumor mechanism in cells and therefore promotes the growth of cancer. [More]
Immunologists discover risk factor responsible for infectious mononucleosis in young people

Immunologists discover risk factor responsible for infectious mononucleosis in young people

More than 90 percent of all adults are carriers of the oncogenic Epstein-Barr Virus. Primary infection with this herpes virus as a young child is generally not linked to any symptoms, and usually offers life-long protection from its cancer-causing effect. However, for people who do not become infected with the virus until adolescence, the infection often leads to infectious mononucleosis (commonly known as glandular fever). Our immune systems can generally fend off this disease after a period of between one and several months. However, there is an increased risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma at a later stage, a cancerous tumor of the lymphatic system. [More]
New study aims to determine prevalence of pediatric chronic fatigue syndrome in Chicago area youth

New study aims to determine prevalence of pediatric chronic fatigue syndrome in Chicago area youth

The prevalence of chronic fatigue syndrome in children and the significant impairment it causes to their physical functioning, school attendance and performance, and extracurricular activities, are at the root of a new Chicago-based study led by DePaul University psychologist Leonard A. Jason. [More]
College students not only bring dirty socks but also mononucleosis to home

College students not only bring dirty socks but also mononucleosis to home

One of the hallmarks of heading home for winter break is the enormous amounts of laundry college students bring as a welcome home present for Mom and Dad. But the dirty socks might not be the only unwelcome guest they transport home. They might also bring mononucleosis, better known as mono. [More]
Canadian discovery could lead to development of vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus

Canadian discovery could lead to development of vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus

Development of a vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus has taken a step forward with the Canadian discovery of how EBV infection evades detection by the immune system. [More]
Apoptosis can reactivate latent herpesviruses in dying cell

Apoptosis can reactivate latent herpesviruses in dying cell

Researchers have found that apoptosis, a natural process of programmed cell death, can reactivate latent herpesviruses in the dying cell. The results of their research, which could have broad clinical significance since many cancer chemotherapies cause apoptosis, was published ahead of print in the Journal of Virology. [More]
Study: Apoptosis triggers alternate replication pathway in HHV

Study: Apoptosis triggers alternate replication pathway in HHV

Washington, DC-Researchers from Children's National Medical Center have found that an alternate, "escape" replication process triggered by apoptosis-the process of cell death or "cell suicide"-appears to be common in human herpesviruses (HHV). [More]
Discovery of pressure-driven infection mechanism opens door to new treatments for viral infections

Discovery of pressure-driven infection mechanism opens door to new treatments for viral infections

The virus that causes those painful lip blisters known as cold sores has an internal pressure eight times higher than a car tire, and uses it to literally blast its infectious DNA into human cells, scientists are reporting in a new study. [More]
European Commission grants orphan drug designation for maribavir for treatment of CMV disease

European Commission grants orphan drug designation for maribavir for treatment of CMV disease

ViroPharma Incorporated today announced that the European Commission has granted orphan drug designation for maribavir for treatment of cytomegaloviral disease in patients with impaired cell mediated immunity. [More]
Research finding aids efforts toward cytomegalovirus vaccine

Research finding aids efforts toward cytomegalovirus vaccine

A virus most people probably have never heard of, but that the majority of us carry, is the No. 1 infectious cause of congenital birth defects in the U.S. today. Because of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection during in utero development, 1 in 750 children are born with or develop permanent disabilities such as hearing loss or brain damage. [More]
Researchers identify second B-cell attachment receptor for Epstein-Barr virus

Researchers identify second B-cell attachment receptor for Epstein-Barr virus

Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) affects more than 90 percent of the population worldwide and was the first human virus found to be associated with cancer. Now, researchers from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have broadened the understanding of this widespread infection with their discovery of a second B-cell attachment receptor for EBV. [More]
Tips for safe displays of affection during Valentine's Day

Tips for safe displays of affection during Valentine's Day

Say "I love you" with flowers, chocolates or a greeting card, but be careful when you kiss this Valentine's Day. [More]
EBV reactivation can increase risk of heart disease

EBV reactivation can increase risk of heart disease

A new study could provide the link that scientists have been looking for to confirm that reactivation of a latent herpes virus is a cause of some heart problems. [More]
Enlarged lymph nodes may warn of cancer

Enlarged lymph nodes may warn of cancer

Enlarged lymph nodes are a marker for both occult cancer and a long-term risk for malignancy, confirms research published in the British Journal of Haematology. [More]
Potential diagnostic method to identify subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

Potential diagnostic method to identify subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome

For the first time, researchers have landed on a potential diagnostic method to identify at least a subset of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), a complex disorder with no known definitive cause or cure. [More]