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Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

Hallucinogenic drug offers relief for people with cancer-related anxiety or depression

In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms." [More]
Study finds no changes in overall rates of suicide attempts and patterns

Study finds no changes in overall rates of suicide attempts and patterns

Johns Hopkins investigators report that their analysis of a national database representing more than 1 billion emergency department visits shows that over a recent eight-year period, nothing much has changed in the rates of unsuccessful suicide attempts, or in the age, gender, seasonal timing or means used by those who tried to take their lives in the United States. [More]
Teen stalking victims more likely to engage in risky behaviors, study finds

Teen stalking victims more likely to engage in risky behaviors, study finds

Stalking is a widely recognized public health concern, yet little information is available about stalking behaviors among teenage victims. [More]
Painless tDCS technique could improve life for people with major depression

Painless tDCS technique could improve life for people with major depression

Small amounts of electricity similar to the output of a common 9-volt battery could improve life for people living with major depression, the most common mood disorder. [More]
Researchers find common brain abnormalities shared across multiple emotional disorders

Researchers find common brain abnormalities shared across multiple emotional disorders

Researchers have long known that emotional disorders have a lot in common. Many often occur together, like depression and social anxiety disorder. Treatments also tend to work across multiple disorders, suggesting shared underlying elements. [More]
Researchers identify reason why antidepressants take so long to work

Researchers identify reason why antidepressants take so long to work

An episode of major depression can be crippling, impairing the ability to sleep, work, or eat. In severe cases, the mood disorder can lead to suicide. But the drugs available to treat depression, which can affect one in six Americans in their lifetime, can take weeks or even months to start working. [More]
New research shows independent gut-to-brain and brain-to-gut pathways operate in IBS patients

New research shows independent gut-to-brain and brain-to-gut pathways operate in IBS patients

New research indicates that in patients with irritable bowedistinct brain-to-gut pathway, where psychological symptoms begin first, and separately a distinctl syndrome (IBS) or indigestion, there is a gut-to-brain pathway, where gut symptoms start first. [More]
Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Risk factors differ for early and delayed dementia after ICH

Acute haematoma parameters predict the onset of dementia in the first 6 months after intracerebral haemorrhage, but not that of delayed dementia, report researchers. [More]
Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Formal mental health therapies offer little relief from postpartum depression for low-income mothers of color

Health care providers and human service agencies often manage postpartum depression with formal mental health treatments and antidepressant therapies, but for new, low-income mothers of color these interventions often provide little relief from the mood disorder that sometimes follows childbirth, according to a new study led by a University at Buffalo researcher. [More]
Depression, anxiety co-occur in bipolar disorder patients following mania

Depression, anxiety co-occur in bipolar disorder patients following mania

Adults with bipolar disorder are just as likely to develop anxiety as depression following an episode of mania, according to data from a national survey of more than 34,000 adults. This finding, published today in Molecular Psychiatry, may expand our understanding of bipolar disorder to include anxiety. [More]
FDA proposes to change regulation of ECT treatment

FDA proposes to change regulation of ECT treatment

For decades, people with severe depression, bipolar disorder, and other major mental health conditions have gotten help from the treatment known as ECT, when nothing else helped them. [More]
Mood disorder experts question effectiveness of metyrapone drug

Mood disorder experts question effectiveness of metyrapone drug

Pioneering research by mood disorder experts at Newcastle University has questioned the effectiveness of metyrapone, a drug suggested to treat depression. [More]
Long-term lithium exposure does not increase renal dysfunction risk

Long-term lithium exposure does not increase renal dysfunction risk

Stable lithium maintenance therapy does not increase the risk of renal dysfunction in patients with bipolar affective disorder, findings from a population-based study suggest. [More]
Neurocrine Biosciences announces positive data from NBI-98854 Phase III trial in tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences announces positive data from NBI-98854 Phase III trial in tardive dyskinesia

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that NBI-98854, a highly selective small molecule VMAT2 inhibitor, showed a statistically significant reduction in tardive dyskinesia during the six weeks of placebo-controlled treatment in the Kinect 3 clinical trial. This Phase III trial included moderate to severe tardive dyskinesia patients with underlying schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, bipolar or major depressive disorder. [More]
Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

Aphantasia: A condition that describes people born with diminished visual imagery ability

If counting sheep is an abstract concept, or you are unable to visualise the faces of loved ones, you could have aphantasia - a newly defined condition to describe people who are born without a "mind's eye". [More]
Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine completes enrollment in Phase III clinical trial of NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients

Neurocrine Biosciences, Inc. announced today that it has recently completed subject randomization of the Phase III clinical trial (Kinect 3 Study) of its proprietary Vesicular Mono-Amine Transporter 2 (VMAT2) compound NBI-98854 in tardive dyskinesia patients. [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers identify ALPIM syndrome as new spectrum disorder

SUNY Downstate Medical Center researchers identify ALPIM syndrome as new spectrum disorder

The relationship between mental and physical health is well established. But when mental and physical illnesses co-occur, patients' accounts of physical illness are sometimes arbitrarily discredited or dismissed by physicians. [More]
People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

People with recurrent depression have significantly smaller hippocampus than healthy individuals

The brains of people with recurrent depression have a significantly smaller hippocampus - the part of the brain most associated with forming new memories - than healthy individuals, a new global study of nearly 9,000 people reveals. [More]
New study shows that depression can make your brain go 'fuzzy'

New study shows that depression can make your brain go 'fuzzy'

People with depression or bipolar disorder often feel their thinking ability has gotten "fuzzy", or less sharp than before their symptoms began. Now, researchers have shown in a very large study that effect is indeed real - and rooted in brain activity differences that show up on advanced brain scans. [More]
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