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Morphine is an extremely potent opiate analgesic psychoactive drug and is considered to be the prototypical opioid. In clinical medicine, morphine is regarded as the gold standard, or benchmark, of analgesics used to relieve severe or agonizing pain and suffering.
Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Morphine after tonsillectomy may be life threatening for children

Treating post-operative pain with morphine can cause life-threatening respiratory problems in some children who have had their tonsils and/or adenoids removed, new research has found. [More]
Childbearing women who take painkillers may face increased risk of birth defects

Childbearing women who take painkillers may face increased risk of birth defects

More than one-fourth of privately-insured and one-third of Medicaid-enrolled women of childbearing age filled prescriptions for opioid-based (narcotic) painkillers between 2008 and 2012, according to a new analysis published today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). [More]
Use of methadone drug to treat pain increases mortality risk

Use of methadone drug to treat pain increases mortality risk

Outside the hospital, use of methadone to treat pain carries a 46 percent increased risk of death when compared to the equally effective but more costly alternative, morphine SR (sustained release). [More]
New experimental study shows immunotherapy can reduce acute effects of heroin

New experimental study shows immunotherapy can reduce acute effects of heroin

Immunotherapy could have a place in the treatment of substance abuse in the future. A specific antibody can reduce the acute effects of heroin, according to a new experimental study at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health. [More]
Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Controlling acute and chronic pain in women

Despite the variety of effective treatments, and physicians who specialize in treating pain, women often suffer unnecessarily from conditions ranging from backaches to pain after cancer surgery, and also treat their pain with medications that may be ineffective and possibly harmful, according to a review of research related to women and pain by the American Society of Anesthesiologists. [More]
European countries implement ATOME project to study improved access to essential painkillers

European countries implement ATOME project to study improved access to essential painkillers

Governments in 12 European countries are to implement the recommendations of research into why more patients are not receiving essential painkillers. [More]
More insight into influence of obesity on distribution, elimination of drugs needed, say experts

More insight into influence of obesity on distribution, elimination of drugs needed, say experts

Doctors and pharmacists often do not take obesity into account when prescribing medication. For this, more insight into the influence of obesity on the distribution and elimination of drugs is of the utmost importance. This is emphasized by Catherijne Knibbe in the most recent issue of the Annual Review of Pharmacology and Toxicology. [More]
FDA approves Hospira's Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection for pain management

FDA approves Hospira's Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection for pain management

Hospira, Inc., the world's leading provider of injectable drugs and infusion technologies, and a global leader in biosimilars, has received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Dyloject (diclofenac sodium) Injection, a proprietary nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) analgesic. [More]
Intriguing small molecule directs activity of key ‘clock proteins’

Intriguing small molecule directs activity of key ‘clock proteins’

In research published in Nature Communications, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacological and physiological science at Saint Louis University, reports intriguing findings about a small molecule that directs the activity of key "clock proteins," offering the potential to manage circadian rhythm and treat problems that are associated with its dysfunction, like sleep and anxiety disorders. [More]
Pain medicine specialist receives award for new advances in oral fluid testing

Pain medicine specialist receives award for new advances in oral fluid testing

This year's Eastern Pain Society Scientific meeting was held at Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center in New York City in late October and is one of the largest meetings of pain physicians and fellows in the tri-state area. [More]
New data shows EXPAREL provides effective pain control following total knee arthroplasty

New data shows EXPAREL provides effective pain control following total knee arthroplasty

Pacira Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced results of an independent, physician-initiated study designed to evaluate the difference in postsurgical pain and opioid consumption between patients who received EXPAREL versus a multi-drug analgesic cocktail for pain management following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). [More]
AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology, the risk of death, overdose, addiction or serious side effects with prescription opioids outweigh the benefits in chronic, non-cancer conditions such as headache, fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. [More]
Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University. [More]
Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

Study: High-dose prescribing increases by 23% in Canada

High-dose opioid prescribing increased by 23 per cent in Canada between 2006 and 2011, despite clinical guidelines recommending that most patients should avoid high-doses of these drugs, according to new research. [More]
Ambulance administration of antiplatelet medication may help heart attack patients

Ambulance administration of antiplatelet medication may help heart attack patients

Ambulance administration of the antiplatelet medication ticagrelor to patients with a type of heart attack known as ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is not better than hospital administration, in terms of improving blood flow in blocked arteries before a revascularisation procedure, according to a new study presented at ESC Congress 2014 today. [More]

Painkillers may not offer relief to people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome

University of Adelaide researchers have discovered that the immune system is defective in people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome, which is a major reason why sufferers have ongoing issues with pain. [More]
State highlights: Calif. hospital bid draws scrutiny; hospital house calls

State highlights: Calif. hospital bid draws scrutiny; hospital house calls

Prime Healthcare Services Inc., a hospital chain that has come under fire for billing and patient privacy issues, is facing opposition over its potential acquisition of six California hospitals, including two medical centers in Los Angeles County. On Friday, hospital workers, union representatives and elected officials protested against Prime outside St. Vincent Medical Center near downtown Los Angeles, one of the six hospitals put up for sale this year by the Daughters of Charity Health System (Garland, 8/15). [More]
Study reports rising prevalence of chronic opioid use by SSDI recipients

Study reports rising prevalence of chronic opioid use by SSDI recipients

More than 40 percent of Social Security Disability Insurance recipients take opioid pain relievers, while the prevalence of chronic opioid use is over 20 percent and rising, reports a study in the September issue of Medical Care. [More]
People born in Canada are at highest risk of overdose or death from codeine than Immigrants

People born in Canada are at highest risk of overdose or death from codeine than Immigrants

Immigrants are at lower risk of an overdose or death after being prescribed codeine than people born in Canada, a new study has found. [More]
Postoperative 'doctor shopping' linked to higher narcotic use among orthopaedic patients

Postoperative 'doctor shopping' linked to higher narcotic use among orthopaedic patients

"Doctor shopping," the growing practice of obtaining narcotic prescriptions from multiple providers, has led to measurable increases in drug use among postoperative trauma patients. [More]