Movement Disorder News and Research RSS Feed - Movement Disorder News and Research

Movement disorders are neurological syndromes where they may be excess of movement or a paucity of movement that is not connected to weakness, paralysis of spasticity of the muscles. They affect the speed, fluency or smoothness, quality, and ease of movement.
Researchers reveal link between intensive instrument playing and movement disorders

Researchers reveal link between intensive instrument playing and movement disorders

A musician takes up his/her violin and starts to play, but rather than gripping the strings, the fingers seize up—and this happens every time he/she takes up the instrument. Such a movement disorder—the so-called focal dystonia— is a dramatic disease for those affected, which has thus far barely been studied. [More]
Anticholinergic medications do not affect cognitive performance in PD patients

Anticholinergic medications do not affect cognitive performance in PD patients

Recent evidence has shown a greater risk of dementia, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD), in individuals using anticholinergic medications regularly. These drugs are widely used by older adults to treat bladder dysfunction, mood, and pain, and many of them are available without prescription. [More]
Ketogenic diet may be effective in treating schizophrenia

Ketogenic diet may be effective in treating schizophrenia

Research by James Cook University scientists has found a diet favoured by body-builders may be effective in treating schizophrenia. [More]
Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases that cause skin-related problems can also trigger serious neurological conditions

Diseases such as lupus that cause rashes and other skin problems also can trigger migraine headaches, strokes and other serious neurological conditions, according to an article by Loyola University Medical Center physicians. [More]
UC San Diego researchers awarded MJFF grant to identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

UC San Diego researchers awarded MJFF grant to identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is difficult to diagnose, particularly in its early stages. Now, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine - aided by a $375,000 grant from The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research - hope to improve the prospects of early diagnosis by identifying a biological signpost in the blood. [More]
Impax's NUMIENT granted EC marketing authorization for symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease

Impax's NUMIENT granted EC marketing authorization for symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease

Impax Laboratories, Inc. today announced that the European Commission has granted marketing authorization for NUMIENT (Levodopa and Carbidopa), a modified-release oral capsule formulation for the symptomatic treatment of adult patients with Parkinson's disease. [More]
MedUni Vienna researchers discover genetic cause of a rare disease

MedUni Vienna researchers discover genetic cause of a rare disease

Researchers at MedUni Vienna have discovered the genetic cause of a rare disease characterized by life-threatening "liver crises" in early childhood and subsequent manifestation of neurological symptoms, such as neuropathy and ataxia (a movement disorder), when they reach school age. [More]
New tool may help diagnose and treat Parkinson's disease in early stages

New tool may help diagnose and treat Parkinson's disease in early stages

A group of experts working under the umbrella of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society, have developed a new tool for healthcare professionals that they hope will mark a significant advancement in the diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease, especially in its early stages. [More]
CPFN, Cure CP raise funds to extend research on cerebral palsy

CPFN, Cure CP raise funds to extend research on cerebral palsy

Will it one day be possible to cure cerebral palsy? Scientists working in a new field of study known as "regenerative medicine" think so. But support is needed to further the research, according to two non-profit organizations founded by parents of children with CP. [More]
Penn Medicine's Gordon Baltuch performs 1,000th deep brain stimulation procedure

Penn Medicine's Gordon Baltuch performs 1,000th deep brain stimulation procedure

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves many of the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and is a life-alerting surgery for many patients. Penn Medicine's Gordon Baltuch, MD, a professor of Neurosurgery and director of the Penn Center for Functional and Restorative Neurosurgery, is one of the most prolific DBS surgeons in the world, having recently performed his 1,000th procedure, marking an important milestone for Baltuch and Penn Medicine. [More]
Psychiatric symptoms predate motor onset in Huntington’s disease

Psychiatric symptoms predate motor onset in Huntington’s disease

Prodromal psychiatric symptoms may be more common in patients with Huntington’s disease than previously thought and worsen as the condition progresses, longitudinal study findings show. [More]
Doctors use MR-guided focused ultrasound to treat essential tremor

Doctors use MR-guided focused ultrasound to treat essential tremor

The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center is one of six locations nationally - and the only one in the Midwest - studying the safety and effectiveness of a promising new technology using MR-guided focused ultrasound to treat patients suffering from essential tremor as part of a multi-center FDA trial. [More]
People with restless legs syndrome at higher risk for stroke, heart and kidney disease

People with restless legs syndrome at higher risk for stroke, heart and kidney disease

Imagine trying to lie down and rest but feeling an uncontrollable urge to keep moving your legs. That, in a nutshell, is the ongoing ordeal facing people with restless legs syndrome. Considered a neurological, sleep, or movement disorder, RLS affects up to 1 in 10 people in the U.S. For those coping with a more severe form of RLS, countless sleepless nights--during which they may toss and turn constantly, or get up and pace the floor--can shatter quality of life. [More]
Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease prevention breakthrough? An interview with Professor Lesley Jones

Huntington’s disease is an inherited disease which, whilst quite rare, is one of the more common inherited neurodegenerative diseases. About 1 in 6,000 people in the UK are at risk and what’s horrible about this disease is that if one of your parents has it, then you have a fifty-fifty chance of inheriting it. [More]
University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine offers MRI-guided focused ultrasound treatment to Parkinson's patients

University of Maryland Medicine (the University of Maryland Medical Center and the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and its Center for Metabolic Imaging and Image-Guided Therapeutics (CMIT) has begun to use MRI-guided focused ultrasound on a deep structure within the brain related to Parkinson's disease - the globus pallidus. [More]
Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Ruhr-Universität Bochum scientists develop mouse model to investigate SCA6

Scientists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum established a mouse model for the human disease SCA6. SCA6 is characterised by movement deficits and caused by similar genetic alterations as Chorea Huntington. The mouse model will be used to investigate the disease mechanisms. [More]
INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

INS announces winners of inaugural best abstract competition at 12th World Congress

The International Neuromodulation Society (INS) announced winners today of its inaugural best abstract competition at the 12th World Congress in Montreal. [More]
International Neuromodulation Society recognizes third Giant of Neuromodulation

International Neuromodulation Society recognizes third Giant of Neuromodulation

The International Neuromodulation Society recognized its third Giant of Neuromodulation at its 12th World Congress in Montreal in June - the first such awardee who is renowned for work in neuromodulation for movement disorder. The honor was given to Prof. Alim-Louis Benabid, MD, PhD, board chairman of the biomedical research center Clinatec in Grenoble. [More]
Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children undergoing deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia experience better outcomes

Children and adolescents who received deep brain stimulation for generalized dystonia maintained significant symptom relief for up to eight years, according to a study presented today at the 12th World Congress of the International Neuromodulation Society. [More]
New blood test may more accurately identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

New blood test may more accurately identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease

A new blood test may more accurately identify blood signatures, or biomarkers, for Parkinson's disease (PD), according to a new study published in the journal Movement Disorders. [More]
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