Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
New Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal to be launched in fall 2015

New Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal to be launched in fall 2015

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, a new peer-reviewed, open access journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, is the only journal dedicated to the scientific, medical, and psychosocial exploration of clinical cannabis, cannabinoids, and the biochemical mechanisms of endocannabinoids. [More]
iCAD announces adoption of Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System in Spain

iCAD announces adoption of Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy System in Spain

iCAD, Inc., an industry-leading provider of advanced image analysis, workflow solutions and radiation therapy for the early identification and treatment of cancer, today announced the first Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System in Spain is now available at the Hospital Miguel Servet for the treatment of early-stage breast cancer, non-melanoma skin cancer and gynecological cancers. [More]
New study shows 'alarming rise' in costs of MS drugs over last 20 years

New study shows 'alarming rise' in costs of MS drugs over last 20 years

A new study shows an "alarming rise" over the last 20 years in the costs of drugs used to slow the progression of multiple sclerosis or reduce the frequency of attacks, according to a study led by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University and Oregon State University. [More]
Study: Demanding jobs raise survival chances in frontotemporal dementia

Study: Demanding jobs raise survival chances in frontotemporal dementia

People with more demanding jobs may live longer after developing the disease frontotemporal dementia than people with less skilled jobs, according to a new study published in the April 22, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

New research published this week in Nature has found several drugs could lead to new treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS), including two drugs that effectively treat MS at the source, in vivo. When administered at the peak of disease, these two drugs showed a striking reversal of disease severity. [More]
Scientists identify protein that could help tame severe inflammation

Scientists identify protein that could help tame severe inflammation

Researchers have identified a protein that offers a new focus for developing targeted therapies to tame the severe inflammation associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), colitis and other autoimmune disorders. [More]
New research examines what happens when MS patients discontinue their medication

New research examines what happens when MS patients discontinue their medication

New research led by NYU Langone Medical Center examines what happens when a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) who is clinically stable stops taking their medication. [More]
CorTechs Labs, Novartis partner to advance clinical care, assessment of multiple sclerosis worldwide

CorTechs Labs, Novartis partner to advance clinical care, assessment of multiple sclerosis worldwide

CorTechs Labs, the leading medical software innovator providing solutions for quantitative brain volume analysis is pleased to announce a partnership agreement with Novartis Pharma AG, a global pharmaceutical company. [More]
Study: Extending natalizumab treatment effective in preventing MS symptoms

Study: Extending natalizumab treatment effective in preventing MS symptoms

In a study of 1,964 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) led by researchers at the NYU Langone Multiple Sclerosis Comprehensive Care Center, extending the dose of natalizumab from 4 weeks up to 8 weeks was shown to be well-tolerated and effective in patients, and resulted in no cases of the potentially fatal side effect progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). [More]
Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

A pair of topical medicines already alleviating skin conditions each may prove to have another, even more compelling use: instructing stem cells in the brain to reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis. [More]
New OCT angiography can improve clinical management of leading causes of blindness

New OCT angiography can improve clinical management of leading causes of blindness

Research published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences demonstrates that technology invented by researchers at Oregon Health & Science University's Casey Eye Institute can improve the clinical management of the leading causes of blindness. [More]
Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two drugs already on the market -- an antifungal and a steroid -- may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study published in Nature today, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. [More]
Tackling the challenge of managing fatigue in MS patients

Tackling the challenge of managing fatigue in MS patients

Fatigue is one of the most commonly reported and debilitating symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) and can significantly reduce an individual's quality of life. Unlike the tiredness that we all experience sometimes, fatigue in those with MS can have a hugely negative impact - it can limit or stop people from doing day-to-day activities and things that really matter to them. [More]
Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

Study shows epilepsy drug can protect vision of MS patients

A drug commonly taken to prevent seizures in epilepsy may surprisingly protect the eyesight of people with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

New research links sleep apnea, heavy snoring with premature cognitive decline

Heavy snoring and sleep apnea may be linked to memory and thinking decline at an earlier age, according to a new study published in the April 15, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New longer-term data on Genzyme's relapsing MS treatments to be presented at AAN 2015

New longer-term data on Genzyme's relapsing MS treatments to be presented at AAN 2015

Genzyme, a Sanofi company, announced today that new longer-term data on its relapsing multiple sclerosis treatments, Aubagio (teriflunomide) and Lemtrada (alemtuzumab), will be featured during the 67th annual meeting of the American Academy of Neurology being held in Washington, D.C. April 18-25. [More]
MEMREHAB trial shows that treatment with mSMT may be adversely affected by cognitive dysfunction

MEMREHAB trial shows that treatment with mSMT may be adversely affected by cognitive dysfunction

Kessler Foundation researchers published a subanalysis of their MEMREHAB trial, which shows that treatment with the modified Story Memory Technique (mSMT) may be affected by cognitive dysfunction. Investigators looked at the influence of processing speed on benefits of the mSMT, a 10-session cognitive intervention protocol shown to improve new learning and memory in individuals with MS. [More]
Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

Arts and craft activities, computer use may stave off memory problems

People who participate in arts and craft activities and who socialize in middle and old age may delay the development in very old age of the thinking and memory problems that often lead to dementia, according to a new study published in the April 8, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Children who eat certain types of food more likely to contract Epstein-Barr virus

Children who eat certain types of food more likely to contract Epstein-Barr virus

A new study by UNC Charlotte scholars is shedding light on the connection between diet and a common childhood disease. [More]
National MS Society commits $28 million to support new MS research projects, training awards

National MS Society commits $28 million to support new MS research projects, training awards

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed $28 million to support an expected 84 new MS research projects and training awards. These are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever – for every single person with MS. [More]
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