Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Researchers identify key genes linked to why some people have higher tolerance for pain

Researchers identify key genes linked to why some people have higher tolerance for pain

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]
Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

Research by UCI, Salk Institute points to novel therapies for minimizing stroke-induced brain damage

​By discovering a new mechanism that allows blood to enter the brain immediately after a stroke, researchers at UC Irvine and the Salk Institute have opened the door to new therapies that may limit or prevent stroke-induced brain damage. [More]

FDA grants clearance for Breathe Technologies’ Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System

Breathe Technologies, Inc. announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted the fifth 510(k) clearance for its Non-Invasive Open Ventilation System, allowing its use with compressed air supply for non-oxygen dependent patients. [More]
Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Apathy signals brain shrinkage in old people

Launer's team used brain volume as a measure of accelerated brain aging. Brain volume losses occur during normal aging, but in this study, larger amounts of brain volume loss could indicate brain diseases. [More]
Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

Understanding GPCRs and controlling inflammation: an interview with Dr. Richard Proia, NIDDK, NIH

GPCRs are one of the largest families of cellular signalling proteins consisting of more than a thousand different types. They reside on the surface membranes of cells where they are poised to recognize molecules in the exterior environment and then transmit this information through the membrane allowing cells to respond accordingly. [More]
Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

Study evaluates co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders

The study evaluated the co-occurrence of cancers in patients with central nervous system disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, autism spectrum disorders, Down's syndrome, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. [More]

Scientists receive grant from Biogen Idec to study everyday activities in MS using actual reality

​John DeLuca, PhD, and Yael Goverover, PhD, OT, have received a grant from Biogen Idec to study how persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) perform everyday life tasks. The grant, entitled "The Use of Actual Reality to Measure Everyday Life Functional Activity in Multiple Sclerosis" provides financial support to conduct this research. [More]
Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people with memory and thinking problems may have lower risk of dying from cancer

Older people who are starting to have memory and thinking problems, but do not yet have dementia may have a lower risk of dying from cancer than people who have no memory and thinking problems, according to a study published in the April 9, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute at Henry Ford Hospital, won the 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for his discovery of the role of a protein in the treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

Saint Louis University researcher Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded $608,376 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to gain a better understanding of how the autoimmune process that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) may be stopped or slowed down. [More]

Auxogyn signs exclusive license agreement with Merck Serono for Eeva Test

Auxogyn, Inc., a company dedicated to advancing women's reproductive health, today announced an exclusive license agreement with Merck Serono, the biopharmaceutical division of Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany which operates as EMD Serono in the United States and Canada, for Auxogyn's proprietary Early Embryo Viability Assessment (Eeva) Test. [More]

Study sheds light on brain mechanisms that make schizophrenia patients misinterpret what they see

People with schizophrenia often misinterpret what they see and experience in the world. New research provides insight into the brain mechanisms that might be responsible for this misinterpretation. [More]
Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults participated in cardio fitness activities may preserve memory, thinking skills in middle age

Young adults who run or participate in other cardio fitness activities may preserve their memory and thinking skills in middle age, according to a new study published in the April 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Middle age was defined as ages 43 to 55. [More]

Kessler Foundation receives grant to study effect of speed of processing training on cognitive performance in MS

​Kessler Foundation received a four-year $750,000 grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to conduct a randomized controlled trial of speed of processing training to improve cognition in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
ANP reports positive results from chronic toxicity study of ATL1102 in multiple sclerosis

ANP reports positive results from chronic toxicity study of ATL1102 in multiple sclerosis

Antisense Therapeutics Limited is pleased to advise that results from a chronic toxicity study in monkeys indicate that ATL1102, an antisense oligonucleotide currently under development for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), was well-tolerated when given subcutaneously for a 6-month dosing period at the 2 dose levels tested (1.5 and 3mg/kg/dose). [More]

U.S. Supreme Court agrees to hear Teva Pharmaceutical's appeal related to COPAXONE patent

Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. (NYSE: TEVA) today announced that the U.S. Supreme Court has granted the Company's COPAXONE® certiorari petition and will hear its appeal of a decision from the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit that invalidated the claim of U.S. Patent 5,800,808 (the "'808 patent"). [More]

Kessler Foundation receives Collaborative MS Research Center Award

Kessler Foundation is the recipient of a MS Research Center Award from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. John DeLuca, PhD, is principal investigator for the five-year $821,000 grant, which will fund the MS Collaborative Network of New Jersey. The MSCNNJ will bring together the Foundation's experts in mobility and cognitive research to advance understanding of cognitive-motor interaction in MS. Dr. DeLuca is Senior Vice President of Research and Training at the Foundation. [More]
Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Biogen Idec's ALPROLIX receives FDA approval for hemophilia B treatment

Today Biogen Idec announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved ALPROLIX [Coagulation Factor IX (Recombinant), Fc Fusion Protein], the first recombinant, DNA derived hemophilia B therapy with prolonged circulation in the body. [More]