Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People who handle complex jobs may have longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities

People whose jobs require more complex work with other people, such as social workers and lawyers, or with data, like architects or graphic designers, may end up having longer-lasting memory and thinking abilities compared to people who do less complex work, according to research published in the November 19, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]

Sanofi, Genzyme announce FDA approval of Lemtrada for treatment of relapsing forms of MS

Sanofi and its subsidiary Genzyme announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Lemtrada (alemtuzumab) for the treatment of patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because of its safety profile, the use of Lemtrada should generally be reserved for patients who have had an inadequate response to two or more drugs indicated for the treatment of MS. [More]
Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Vitamin B12, folic acid supplements may not reduce risk of memory and thinking problems

Taking vitamin B12 and folic acid supplements may not reduce the risk of memory and thinking problems after all, according to a new study published in the November 12, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study is one of the largest to date to test long-term use of supplements and thinking and memory skills. [More]
Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body's own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged. [More]
Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Study points to major role of obesity in triggering, prolonging autoimmune diseases

Autoimmune diseases like Crohn's Disease and multiple sclerosis, in which the immune system attacks its own body rather than predatory invaders, affect 5-20% of the global community. A study published recently in Autoimmunity Reviews by Prof. Yehuda Shoenfeld, the Laura Schwarz-Kipp Chair for Research of Autoimmune Diseases at Tel Aviv University's Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Head of Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases at Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, points to the major role obesity plays in triggering and prolonging these autoimmune diseases. [More]
U of T, Chematria and IBM partner to find new treatments for Ebola virus

U of T, Chematria and IBM partner to find new treatments for Ebola virus

The University of Toronto, Chematria and IBM are combining forces in a quest to find new treatments for the Ebola virus. [More]
Living with multiple sclerosis (MS): an interview with Gretchen Rubin and Megan Weigel

Living with multiple sclerosis (MS): an interview with Gretchen Rubin and Megan Weigel

Multiple sclerosis, or MS, is a chronic, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves. Symptoms may be mild, moderate, or severe, ranging from numbness in the limbs to paralysis or loss of vision. Approximately 400,000 Americans are living with MS. [More]

Perrigo agrees to acquire Omega for $4.5 billion

Perrigo Company plc, a leading global provider of "Quality Affordable Healthcare Products," and Omega Pharma NV, one of the largest OTC healthcare companies in Europe, headquartered in Nazareth, Belgium, today announced that they have entered into a definitive agreement in which Perrigo has agreed to acquire Omega for €3.6 billion, or $4.5 billion, comprised of the purchase of Omega's equity for €2.48 billion and the assumption of €1.1 billion in debt. [More]

Perrigo re-launches shipments of Guaifenesin 600mg Extended-Release tablets

Perrigo Company plc announced today that it has reinitiated shipments of Guaifenesin 600mg Extended-Release tablets to its retail and wholesale customers in the United States. The product will be packaged and marketed under store and proprietary brands and will be a high quality, value alternative to Mucinex 600mg Extended-Release tablets. [More]
Commonly prescribed drugs for arthritis and pain may increase risk of death from stroke

Commonly prescribed drugs for arthritis and pain may increase risk of death from stroke

Commonly prescribed, older drugs for arthritis and pain may increase the risk of death from stroke, according to a study published in the November 5, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. [More]
Medical illness common in bipolar disorder

Medical illness common in bipolar disorder

Patients with bipolar disorder have high rates of medical illness, which often exceeds the levels observed in patients with unipolar depression, show results of a UK-based study. [More]
Hemp Health launches CBD wellness supplements

Hemp Health launches CBD wellness supplements

Hemp Health Inc., a pioneer in hemp cannabidiol (CBD) products, today launched their line of CBD wellness supplements. Available in oil, spray and capsule form, Hemp Health's products offer a compelling alternative to medical marijuana. The CBD supplements provide consumers with the therapeutic ingredient in hemp while allowing them to avoid the negative mental and physical effects of marijuana. [More]
Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

Study: Vitamin D deficiency more prevalent in neuromuscular conditions

A study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine adds more credence to a growing awareness of the high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in neuromuscular disease. [More]
Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Insilico Medicine, CCARL and Plantbiosis partner to advance research on aging

Through this unique partnership, the Baltimore-based Insilico Medicine and Lethbridge-based CCARL will provide expertise in aging research and build on the personalized medicine and drug discovery platforms OncoFinder and GeroScope to develop new systems for age-related diseases. [More]
BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

BRI receives JDRF grant to explore why people with type 1 diabetes continue to produce insulin

Scientists at Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason are studying a critical question in type 1 diabetes: Why do some people who get type 1 diabetes continue to produce small amounts of insulin over time while others stop? Researchers have found at the time of diagnosis with type 1 diabetes that many people continue to produce small amounts of insulin. [More]
New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans — ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma — mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments. [More]
High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

High-fat, low-carb diets may help control epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of the research published in the October 29, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
InSilico Medicine, CCARL collaborate to improve personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis

InSilico Medicine, CCARL collaborate to improve personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis

InSilico Medicine, the company focused on drug discovery for cancer and age-related diseases, announced its investment in a research collaboration with Canada Cancer and Aging Research Laboratories, Inc. The companies will collaborate on improving decision making in clinical oncology and discovery, and personalized medicine projects in multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Research could pave way for more effective drugs to treat inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation associated with diseases such as ulcerative colitis, arthritis and multiple sclerosis. [More]
Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body's natural defence against this 'friendly fire', scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Monterotondo, Italy, have found. [More]