Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found “decorating” brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. [More]
Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has provided a grant to a Wayne State University School of Medicine professor to explore a new model of MS pathology. [More]
University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

University of Oslo researchers find the cause of coeliac disease

Professor Ludvig M. Sollid and his colleagues at the University of Oslo have found the cause of coeliac disease. To do so required really going into depth, right down to molecular level. [More]
UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

Advances in nanotechnology and nano-fabrication are fundamentally changing the future of medicine, enabling more effective diagnostics and targeted drugs, and new bioactive materials that can help repair our bodies. [More]
Synthetic Biologics announces initiation of SYN-010 Phase 2 clinical trial for treatment of IBS-C

Synthetic Biologics announces initiation of SYN-010 Phase 2 clinical trial for treatment of IBS-C

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a clinical-stage company focused on developing therapeutics to protect the microbiome while targeting pathogen-specific diseases, reported the initiation of a Phase 2 clinical trial of its proprietary SYN-010 for the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome with constipation (IBS-C). [More]
Amy Schumer promises 'disappointing lap dance' for winner of TrainWreck Premiere contest to support MS research

Amy Schumer promises 'disappointing lap dance' for winner of TrainWreck Premiere contest to support MS research

Amy Schumer, writer and star of the upcoming comedy, TrainWreck, has promised a 'disappointing lap dance' for the winner of Universal's TrainWreck Premiere Experience hosted on CrowdRise to benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, an organization that is very dear to her heart. [More]
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research journal supports President Obama's statement on medical use of marijuana

Mary Ann Liebert, publisher of the newly launched peer-reviewed open access journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research, strongly supports President Obama's statement that "...carefully prescribed medical use of marijuana may in fact be appropriate and we should follow the science as opposed to ideology on this issue," when asked about a pending Senate bill seeking to change federal law regarding state-legalized medical marijuana programs. [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD announces EC approval of SIMPONI (golimumab) for treatment of adult patients with nr-axial SpA

MSD (Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, New Jersey, USA) today announced that on 22 June the European Commission approved SIMPONI (golimumab) for the treatment of adult patients with severe, active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (nr-axial SpA). [More]
OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

On July 6, 2015, OhioHealth will open its doors to the new OhioHealth Neuroscience Center on Riverside Methodist Hospital's campus. [More]
Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario announces $25 million investment to support new treatments for people with chronic diseases

Ontario is investing $25 million over five years to support new treatments and therapies for people living with chronic diseases, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. [More]
Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and their clinicians see clear improvements during treatment with a high dose of biotin, show further results from the phase III trial of the therapy. [More]
New research sheds light on molecular architecture of receptors linked to many brain diseases

New research sheds light on molecular architecture of receptors linked to many brain diseases

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have teamed up with several other institutions and pharmaceutical companies, including the University of Southern California (USC), San Diego's Receptos Inc. and Japanese company Ono Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., to publish the first 3D structures of a receptor implicated in many diseases of the brain and in normal physiology throughout the body. [More]
MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay, a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of nervous system disorders, reports additional positive data from its pivotal Phase III clinical trial, MS-SPI, with MD1003, a highly-concentrated pharmaceutical grade biotin, in patients with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. [More]
LMU clinicians reveal mechanism involved in determining lifetime of antibody-producing cells

LMU clinicians reveal mechanism involved in determining lifetime of antibody-producing cells

Clinicians at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich have elucidated a mechanism involved in determining the lifespan of antibody-producing cells, and identified a promising new biomarker for monitoring autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis and lupus erythematosus. [More]
Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

Physical activities may not protect against underlying markers for Alzheimer's disease

While participating in physical activities such as bike riding, dancing, walking and gardening and mentally stimulating activities such as crosswords and reading may reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease, they may not do so by affecting the underlying markers for the disease, according to a study published in the June 10, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Specialized brain proteins may be detected in the blood samples of individuals with Alzheimer's disease

Specialized brain proteins may be detected in the blood samples of individuals with Alzheimer's disease

Specialized brain proteins that are involved in the removal of damaged nerve cell materials may be detected in the blood of people who were diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment or dementia due to Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Apitope's ATX-F8-117 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of haemophilia A patients

Apitope's ATX-F8-117 granted FDA Orphan Drug Designation for treatment of haemophilia A patients

Apitope, the drug discovery and development company focused on disease-modifying treatments that reinstate immune tolerance, announced today that pre-clinical product candidate ATX-F8-117 has been granted Orphan Drug Status by the US Food and Drug Administration for the prevention or treatment of inhibitors in haemophilia A patients with inhibitors or at the risk of producing inhibitors. [More]
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