Multiple Sclerosis News and Research RSS Feed - Multiple Sclerosis News and Research

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a severe autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that affects the brain and spinal cord, causing problems with muscle movement, balance and vision.

In MS, the protein coating called myelin, which protects nerves and helps electrical signals travel from the brain to the rest of the body, is damaged. The immune system, which usually fights infection, mistakes myelin for a foreign body and attacks it, stripping it from around the nerves. Exactly what causes this abnormal immune response is unclear, but research suggests a combination of both genetic and environmental factors.

The damaged myelin disrupts the transfer of nerve signals which may slow down, become distorted or stop altogether. This can cause severe symptoms ranging from vision loss through to muscle stiffness, loss of control over muscle movement, difficulties with balance and poor co-ordination.

Around 100,000 people in the UK have MS and it affects about three times as many women as men. The usual age at which diagnosis occurs is around 30, however, symptoms often first develop between the ages of 15 and 45.

Currently, there is no cure for MS but therapeutic approaches such as physiotherapy and steroid injections are used to manage the condition and ease symptoms.
Knowledge Analyzer available at Zynx Health

Knowledge Analyzer available at Zynx Health

Zynx Health™, the market leader in providing evidence- and experience-based clinical improvement solutions, has announced the general availability of Knowledge Analyzer™, a scalable solution that helps organizations quickly realize the full value of electronic health record (EHR) systems. [More]
Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

Study finds microglia increase neuronal firing and enhance brain cell survival after injury

A type of immune cell widely believed to exacerbate chronic adult brain diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), can actually protect the brain from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and may slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases, according to Cleveland Clinic research published today in the online journal Nature Communications. [More]
Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers identify group of cells in brain that plays important role in Down syndrome

Researchers from UC Davis School of Medicine and Shriners Hospitals for Children - Northern California have identified a group of cells in the brain that they say plays an important role in the abnormal neuron development in Down syndrome. [More]
People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

People with mild traumatic brain injury may have brain damage and memory problems

Even mild traumatic brain injury may cause brain damage and thinking and memory problems, according to a study published in the July 16, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Chemoprevention and colon cancer: an interview with Dr. John Letterio, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

The basic idea of cancer chemopre­vention is to arrest or reverse the progression of pre­malignant cells towards full malignancy, using physiological mechanisms that do not kill healthy cells. [More]
Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Study: People with mobility impairments under age 65 have higher rates of smoking

Researchers from The Miriam Hospital have found that people with mobility impairments under age 65 have significantly higher rates of smoking than those without mobility impairments. [More]
Tute Genomics agrees to provide NGS analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS

Tute Genomics agrees to provide NGS analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS

Tute Genomics, the leader in genome annotation and interpretation, today announced an agreement with Lineagen, Inc., to provide next-generation sequencing (NGS) analytics for Lineagen's NextStepDx PLUS. [More]
Dmitry Medvedev presents Russia's first national "Industry" award to BIOCAD

Dmitry Medvedev presents Russia's first national "Industry" award to BIOCAD

On July 9 Prime Minister of the Russian Federation Dmitry Medvedev, presented Russia's first national "Industry" award to a biopharmaceutical company BIOCAD. [More]
Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

Researchers examine which teens have emotional symptoms after concussion

After a concussion, teens who are sensitive to light or noise may be more likely to also have emotional symptoms such as anxiety, according to a study released today that will be presented at The Sports Concussion Conference in Chicago, July 11 to 13, 2014, hosted by the American Academy of Neurology, the world's leading authority on diagnosing and managing sports concussion. [More]
New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

New paper states that doctors have ethical obligation to educate, protect athletes from concussion

The American Academy of Neurology (AAN), the largest professional association of neurologists and a leading authority on sports concussion, is releasing a new position paper that states doctors have an ethical obligation to educate and protect athletes from sports concussion and clear them to play only when the athlete is medically ready, standing firm against objections from players, parents or coaches. [More]
Scientists find a new strategy for brain cancer treatment

Scientists find a new strategy for brain cancer treatment

Scientists at the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University and McGill University Health Centre have shown that a member of the protein family known as SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) is a key to why tumour cells multiply uncontrollably, especially in the case of glioblastoma. T [More]
Perrigo receives final approval from FDA for congestion relief tablets

Perrigo receives final approval from FDA for congestion relief tablets

Perrigo Company today announced that it was the first to receive final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for its abbreviated new drug application for ibuprofen and phenylephrine hydrochloride tablets, 200 mg/10 mg (over-the-counter), the store brand equivalent to Advil Congestion Relief Tablets, 200 mg/10 mg. [More]
UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, Dermira enter into licensing agreement for development, commercialization of Cimzia

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical leader, and Dermira, Inc., a privately held US-based dermatology company, announced today that they have entered into an exclusive licensing agreement for the development and future commercialization of Cimzia (certolizumab pegol) in dermatology. [More]
Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

Regular walking may ease Parkinson's symptoms

People with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease who regularly walk for exercise may improve their motor function, mood, tiredness, fitness and some aspects of thinking abilities, according to a study published in the July 2, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers find unique cell type that can protect against uveitis

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have found a unique cell type that, in tests on mice, can protect against uveitis—a group of inflammatory diseases that affect the eye and can cause vision loss. [More]
ANMAT approves Genzyme’s Lemtrada for treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

ANMAT approves Genzyme’s Lemtrada for treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis

Genzyme, a Sanofi company (EURONEXT:SAN and NYSE:SNY), announced today that Argentina's National Administration of Drugs, Food and Medical Technology (ANMAT) has approved LemtradaTM (alemtuzumab) for adult patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) with active disease defined by clinical or imaging features. [More]
Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics supports SYN-004 C.difficile preventative program with formation of Clinical Advisory Board

Synthetic Biologics, Inc., a developer of novel anti-infective biologic and drug candidates targeting specific pathogens that cause serious infections and diseases, announced today the formation of a Clinical Advisory Board (CAB) to support development of SYN-004, the Company's lead anti-infective product candidate for the prevention of the devastating effects of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) [More]
Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers give new, unprecedented 3-D view of most important brain receptors

Researchers with Oregon Health & Science University's Vollum Institute have given science a new and unprecedented 3-D view of one of the most important receptors in the brain - a receptor that allows us to learn and remember, and whose dysfunction is involved in a wide range of neurological diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, schizophrenia and depression. [More]
Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Veterans with traumatic brain injury more likely to develop dementia in later life

Older veterans who have experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) are 60 percent more likely to later develop dementia than veterans without TBI, according to a study published in the June 25, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
SLU researchers discover pain pathway and potential way to block it

SLU researchers discover pain pathway and potential way to block it

In a recently published study in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Saint Louis University professor of pharmacological and physiological sciences Daniela Salvemini, Ph.D. describes two discoveries: a molecular pathway by which a painful chemotherapy side effect happens and a drug that may be able to stop it. [More]