Muscular Dystrophy News and Research RSS Feed - Muscular Dystrophy News and Research

The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of more than 30 genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscles that control movement. Some forms of MD are seen in infancy or childhood, while others may not appear until middle age or later. The disorders differ in terms of the distribution and extent of muscle weakness (some forms of MD also affect cardiac muscle), age of onset, rate of progression, and pattern of inheritance.
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]
New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

New mouse study indicates that mutant protein in muscle cells is responsible for SBMA

Sometimes known as Kennedy's disease, spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disorder characterized by slowly progressive muscle weakness and atrophy. [More]
Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

Research suggests that person can slow aging process by exercising regularly

New research by Canadian sports medicine physician Mark Tarnopolsky, MD, PhD, suggests that a person can slow the speed at which they age by exercising regularly. Dr. Tarnopolsky presented his research titled, "Exercise as a Countermeasure for Aging: From Mice to Humans" today at the 23rd Annual Meeting of the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine (AMSSM). Dr. Tarnopolsky discussed how regular exercise not only improves the quality of life but can also extend a person's lifespan by up to five years. [More]
Thomson Reuters, Children's Tumor Foundation partner to create neurofibromatosis pathway maps

Thomson Reuters, Children's Tumor Foundation partner to create neurofibromatosis pathway maps

The Intellectual Property & Science business of Thomson Reuters, the world's leading provider of intelligent information for businesses and professionals, today announced an expansion of its partnership with the Children's Tumor Foundation to create unique neurofibromatosis (NF) pathway maps aimed at significantly increasing the understanding of the disease and its underlying mechanisms. [More]

Jain Foundation's dysferlinopathy clinical study exceeds original goal of 150 patients

The Jain Foundation is delighted to announce that 193 patients have been recruited into the Clinical Outcome Study for Dysferlinopathy (COS), exceeding the original goal of 150 patients. [More]

Device to improve blood flow implanted in muscular dystrophy patient

"Today, we're going to make history," said 18-year-old Eric Ramos on the day UT Southwestern Medical Center doctors operated on his ailing heart. [More]
New way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells from human stem cells

New way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells from human stem cells

As stem cells continue their gradual transition from the lab to the clinic, a research group at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has discovered a new way to make large concentrations of skeletal muscle cells and muscle progenitors from human stem cells. [More]

Findings support development of cysteine protease inhibitors as new drug target for AD

A team of scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, the Medical University of South Carolina and San Diego-based American Life Science Pharmaceuticals, Inc., report that cathepsin B gene knockout or its reduction by an enzyme inhibitor blocks creation of key neurotoxic pGlu-Aβ peptides linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, the candidate inhibitor drug has been shown to be safe in humans. [More]
Patients with congenital disorders are urged to register with CMDIR to advance clinical trials

Patients with congenital disorders are urged to register with CMDIR to advance clinical trials

If you are affected by Malignant Hyperthermia, Congenital Muscular Dystrophies or Congenital Myopathy Subtypes, the Malignant Hyperthermia Association of the United States and the Cure Congenital Muscle Disease organization are asking for your help to enable research and clinical trials by registering with the Congenital Muscle Disease International Registry (CMDIR). [More]
Takeda works with UCL to drive research into tackling muscle disorders

Takeda works with UCL to drive research into tackling muscle disorders

Japanese pharmaceutical company Takeda will work with University College London (UCL) to drive research into tackling muscle disorders, in particular muscular dystrophy. [More]
High-carbohydrate, high-calorie diet could delay progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

High-carbohydrate, high-calorie diet could delay progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

A high-carbohydrate, high-calorie diet could delay the progression of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease or Lou Gehrig’s disease, according to a phase 2 study published in The Lancet. [More]
Sarepta Therapeutics reports non-GAAP net loss of $29.1 million for Q4 2013

Sarepta Therapeutics reports non-GAAP net loss of $29.1 million for Q4 2013

Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc., a developer of innovative RNA-based therapeutics, today reported financial results for the three months and year ended December 31, 2013, and provided an update of recent corporate developments. [More]

Prothelia and University of Nevada, Reno enter into agreements with Alexion for development of Laminin-111

Prothelia Incorporated (Prothelia) and University of Nevada, Reno announce that they have entered into strategic agreements with Alexion for the development of Laminin-111, a patented experimental protein replacement therapy for merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A), a life-threatening, ultra-rare disease caused by a genetic deficiency of the Laminin-211 protein. [More]
Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on ISIS-SMNRx Phase 2 study in infants with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals provides update on ISIS-SMNRx Phase 2 study in infants with SMA

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today provided an update on its ongoing open label, multiple dose Phase 2 study of ISIS-SMNRx in infants with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). [More]
Study points to unique therapeutic approach for managing muscle-wasting conditions

Study points to unique therapeutic approach for managing muscle-wasting conditions

New findings on why skeletal muscle stem cells stop dividing and renewing muscle mass during aging points up a unique therapeutic opportunity for managing muscle-wasting conditions in humans, says a new University of Colorado Boulder study. [More]

Prothelia, University of Nevada, Reno and Alexion partner to develop Laminin-111 for MDC1A

Prothelia Incorporated and University of Nevada, Reno announce that they have entered into strategic agreements with Alexion for the development of Laminin-111, a patented experimental protein replacement therapy for merosin-deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A), a life-threatening, ultra-rare disease caused by a genetic deficiency of the Laminin-211 protein. [More]

LA Fitness to host in-club Group Fitness class in support of Augie's Quest

In support of Augie's Quest, LA Fitness announced today that it will host an in-club Group Fitness class at more than 500 of the company's locations on February 22, 2014. Augie's Quest is a nonprofit research initiative dedicated to finding treatments and a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). LA Fitness has donated to Augie's Quest for several years, and this year's fundraiser marks the fourth in-club event the company has held in support of this worthy cause. [More]
Researchers demonstrate new approach to treating muscular dystrophy

Researchers demonstrate new approach to treating muscular dystrophy

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have demonstrated a new approach to treating muscular dystrophy. Mice with a form of this muscle-weakening disease showed improved strength and heart function when treated with nanoparticles loaded with rapamycin, an immunosuppressive drug recently found to improve recycling of cellular waste. [More]
New approach for reducing levels of toxic protein fragments associated with Huntington's disease

New approach for reducing levels of toxic protein fragments associated with Huntington's disease

An innovative therapeutic strategy for reducing the levels of toxic protein fragments associated with Huntington's disease uses a new approach called exon skipping to remove the disease-causing component of the essential protein, huntingtin. [More]
Researchers examine how toxin triggers motor neuron death

Researchers examine how toxin triggers motor neuron death

In most cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, a toxin released by cells that normally nurture neurons in the brain and spinal cord can trigger loss of the nerve cells affected in the disease, Columbia researchers reported today in the online edition of the journal Neuron. [More]