Muscular Dystrophy News and Research RSS Feed - Muscular Dystrophy News and Research

The muscular dystrophies (MD) are a group of more than 30 genetic diseases characterized by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal muscles that control movement. Some forms of MD are seen in infancy or childhood, while others may not appear until middle age or later. The disorders differ in terms of the distribution and extent of muscle weakness (some forms of MD also affect cardiac muscle), age of onset, rate of progression, and pattern of inheritance.
Duchenne muscular dystrophy: direct effect on muscle stem cells? An interview with Dr Rudnicki

Duchenne muscular dystrophy: direct effect on muscle stem cells? An interview with Dr Rudnicki

For twenty years, it has been understood that dystrophin is expressed in differentiated muscle fibers where it is part of a protein complex that crosses the membrane and connects the extracellular matrix to the actin network inside the cell to provide structural integrity. [More]
Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

Alternative splicing: a new approach to drug development? An interview with Lucy Donaldson

RNA is becoming an interesting drug target as it takes possible intervention back one step to the synthesis of a target protein, instead of trying to block or inhibit a process. [More]
Two studies shed new light on nature of tandem DNA repeat arrays

Two studies shed new light on nature of tandem DNA repeat arrays

A pair of studies by a team of scientists has shed new light on the nature of a particular type of DNA sequences—tandem DNA repeat arrays—that play important roles in transcription control, genome organization, and development. [More]

New robotic arm could support daily activities of patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

Researchers from the University of Twente's MIRA research centre, together with the VUmc, TU Delft and the Radboud umc, have developed the A-Gear: a robotic arm that can support the daily activities of people suffering the muscular disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. [More]
NUS researchers develop EsoGlove that helps patients restore hand functions

NUS researchers develop EsoGlove that helps patients restore hand functions

Patients who have lost their hand functions due to injuries or nerve-related conditions, such as stroke and muscular dystrophy, now have a chance of restoring their hand movements by using a new lightweight and smart rehabilitation device called EsoGlove developed by a research team from the National University of Singapore. [More]
U-M research could lead to new ways of fighting X-linked diseases in girls and women

U-M research could lead to new ways of fighting X-linked diseases in girls and women

Nearly every girl and woman on Earth carries two X chromosomes in nearly every one of her cells -- but one of them does (mostly) nothing. That's because it's been silenced, keeping most of its DNA locked up and unread like a book in a cage. [More]
Leukaemia drug could slow progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Leukaemia drug could slow progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

A drug commonly used to treat leukaemia is showing potential as a treatment that could slow the progression of the muscle-wasting condition, Duchenne muscular dystrophy. [More]
UT Southwestern scientists use new gene-editing technique to prevent progression of DMD in young mice

UT Southwestern scientists use new gene-editing technique to prevent progression of DMD in young mice

Using a new gene-editing technique, a team of scientists from UT Southwestern Medical Center stopped progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in young mice. [More]
Researchers successfully use CRISPR to treat adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers successfully use CRISPR to treat adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Researchers have used CRISPR to treat an adult mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. This marks the first time that CRISPR has successfully treated a genetic disease inside a fully developed living mammal with a strategy that has the potential to be translated to human therapy. [More]
Researchers find new way to prevent or reduce pathologies caused by malformed proteins

Researchers find new way to prevent or reduce pathologies caused by malformed proteins

Improperly formed proteins can cause a host of serious illnesses, from muscular dystrophy to cystic fibrosis. A question of enormous import in research, beyond the challenge of determining how malformed proteins contribute to specific disease processes, is figuring out ways to prevent or reduce the pathologies they cause. [More]
Cancer drug can neutralize toxic RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy

Cancer drug can neutralize toxic RNA that causes myotonic dystrophy

A group of researchers has shown for the first time in cells and in a mouse model that a drug used to treat cancer can neutralize the toxic RNA that causes the prolonged muscle contractions and other symptoms of myotonic dystrophy type 1, the most common form of adult-onset muscular dystrophy. [More]
UofL researchers discover mechanism involved in skeletal muscle repair

UofL researchers discover mechanism involved in skeletal muscle repair

Researchers at the University of Louisville have discovered a mechanism involved in skeletal muscle repair that may enable clinicians to boost the effectiveness of adult stem cell therapies for diseases such as muscular dystrophy. [More]
Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

Could statins treat muscular dystrophy? An interview with Dr. Nick Whitehead and Dr Stan Froehner

In addition to their well established cholesterol lowering benefits, statins also have potent anti-inflammatory, anti-fibrotic and antioxidant effects, which continue to be identified in a wide range of diseases. [More]
Researchers use magic-angle-spinning NMR to unveil structure of CAP-Gly protein

Researchers use magic-angle-spinning NMR to unveil structure of CAP-Gly protein

A latticework of tiny tubes called microtubules gives your cells their shape and also acts like a railroad track that essential proteins travel on. But if there is a glitch in the connection between train and track, diseases can occur. [More]
Duchenne muscular dystrophy could directly affect muscle stem cells

Duchenne muscular dystrophy could directly affect muscle stem cells

A new study from The Ottawa Hospital and the University of Ottawa is poised to completely change our understanding of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and pave the way for far more effective treatments. [More]
Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Researchers identify factors that increase risk of cardiac arrest during pediatric spine surgeries

Although the vast majority of pediatric spine surgeries are safe, a handful of neuromuscular conditions seem to fuel the risk of cardiac arrest during such operations, according to research led by investigators at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. [More]
Drug compounds target multiple pathways associated with myotonic dystrophy type 1

Drug compounds target multiple pathways associated with myotonic dystrophy type 1

Efforts to treat myotonic dystrophy type 1, the most common form of muscular dystrophy, are in their infancy. In a new study, researchers report they have added new capabilities to an experimental drug agent that previously defeated only one of DM1's many modes of action. Their retooled compounds interrupt the disease's pathology in three ways. [More]
Simple, low risk blood test can detect foetal blood group and genetic conditions in unborn babies

Simple, low risk blood test can detect foetal blood group and genetic conditions in unborn babies

Research into a simple, accurate and low risk blood test that can detect foetal blood group, sex, and genetic conditions in unborn babies has been published in the international scientific journal, Clinical Chemistry. [More]
U-M study suggests new therapeutic strategy for treating Duchene muscular dystrophy

U-M study suggests new therapeutic strategy for treating Duchene muscular dystrophy

Every heart beat and step in our daily lives is dependent on the integrity of muscles and the proteins that keep them strong and free of injury as they contract and relax. [More]
MU researchers successfully treat dogs with DMD, plan for human clinical trials

MU researchers successfully treat dogs with DMD, plan for human clinical trials

Muscular dystrophy, which affects approximately 250,000 people in the U.S., occurs when damaged muscle tissue is replaced with fibrous, fatty or bony tissue and loses function. For years, scientists have searched for a way to successfully treat the most common form of the disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), which primarily affects boys. Now, a team of University of Missouri researchers have successfully treated dogs with DMD and say that human clinical trials are being planned in the next few years. [More]
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