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Myelin is the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves.
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

New research examines evidence of damage to your hearing. Many people listen to loud music without realizing that this can affect their hearing. [More]
Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
Researcher highlights potential for interaction between key CNS plasticity mechanisms

Researcher highlights potential for interaction between key CNS plasticity mechanisms

The adult CNS is remarkably adaptable - it retains the ability to generate and integrate new cells, and remodel pre-existing circuits. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]
Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

A scholarly article on wireless safety, published online in the Journal of Microscopy and Ultrastructure, reports that children and fetuses are the most at risk from neurological and biological damage that results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices, due to the higher rate of absorption of microwave radiation by children than by adults. [More]
Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Study provides platform for detailed study of nerve injury and repair during Wallerian degeneration

Wallerian degeneration is a subject of major interest in neuroscience. A large number of genes are differentially regulated during the distinct stages of Wallerian degeneration: transcription factor activation, immune response, myelin cell differentiation and dedifferentiation. [More]
Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists one step closer to creating viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis patients

Scientists at The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute are one step closer to creating a viable cell replacement therapy for multiple sclerosis from a patient's own cells. [More]
Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Elevated ASM activity linked to Alzheimer's disease

Unclogging the body's protein disposal system may improve memory in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study from scientists at Kyungpook National University in Korea published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. [More]
Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Study: L-carnitine has neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats

Several studies have demonstrated that L-carnitine exhibits neuroprotective effects on injured sciatic nerve of rats with diabetes mellitus. [More]
Scientists identify novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis

Scientists identify novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis

Scientists in the University of Connecticut's Technology Incubation Program have identified a novel approach to treating multiple sclerosis (MS) using human embryonic stem cells, offering a promising new therapy for more than 2.3 million people suffering from the debilitating disease. [More]
Dendrimer offers a simple way of creating vesicles

Dendrimer offers a simple way of creating vesicles

One of the defining features of cells is their membranes. Each cell's repository of DNA and protein-making machinery must be kept stable and secure from invaders and toxins. Scientists have attempted to replicate these properties, but, despite decades of research, even the most basic membrane structures, known as vesicles, still face many problems when made in the lab. They are difficult to make at consistent sizes and lack the stability of their biological counterparts. [More]
About MS booklet now available as a printed and online publication

About MS booklet now available as a printed and online publication

The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America is pleased to announce that the newly published About MS booklet is now available as both a printed and online publication. [More]
Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

Oligodendrocyte lineage gene 1 plays key role in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage

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Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists present new view of myelin

Harvard neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. [More]
U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

U.Va. researchers named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards

University of Virginia neurologist Dr. Erin Pennock Foff, biologist Sarah Kucenas and biomedical engineer Shayn Peirce-Cotter have been named recipients of 2013 Hartwell Individual Biomedical Research Awards to benefit children of the United States. Each scientist will receive $100,000 in direct annual research support from The Hartwell Foundation for three years. [More]
Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Researcher wins 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for contributions in treatment of neurological diseases

Michael Chopp, Ph.D., scientific director of the Henry Ford Neuroscience Institute at Henry Ford Hospital, won the 2014 Abraham White Distinguished Science Award for his discovery of the role of a protein in the treatment of brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

SLU researcher receives $608,376 grant to design better clinical treatments for multiple sclerosis

Saint Louis University researcher Daniel Hawiger, M.D., Ph.D., has been awarded $608,376 from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society to gain a better understanding of how the autoimmune process that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) may be stopped or slowed down. [More]
New subcellular mechanism identified for fast transmission in basket cells of the brain

New subcellular mechanism identified for fast transmission in basket cells of the brain

In his third major research paper since December 2013, IST Austria Professor Peter Jonas together with his collaborator, postdoc Hua Hu, identifies a new subcellular mechanism for reliable, fast transmission in the so-called basket cells of the brain. [More]
Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with MS appears linked with JC virus infection

Treatment with natalizumab in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) appears linked with JC virus (JCV) infection, which can lead to a rare and often fatal demyelinating disease of the central nervous system called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) that destroys the myelin that protects nerve cells. [More]