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Myelin is the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves.
Cryoport to support future clinical trials for Opexa's personalized T-cell immunotherapy programs for MS, NMO

Cryoport to support future clinical trials for Opexa's personalized T-cell immunotherapy programs for MS, NMO

Cryoport, Inc., the leading provider of advanced cryogenic logistics solutions for the life sciences industry, today announced that its validated cryogenic logistics solution will support future clinical trials for Opexa Therapeutics' lead personalized T-cell immunotherapy programs for Multiple Sclerosis ("MS") and Neuromyelitis Optica ("NMO"). [More]
NFIX protein drives NSC differentiation toward oligodendrocytes

NFIX protein drives NSC differentiation toward oligodendrocytes

An international team of researchers has shown that NFIX, a protein that regulates neuronal stem cell activity (NSC), also has a role in driving NSC differentiation toward oligodendrocytes, a type of glial cell. These cells produce the myelin that surrounds and protects neurons. [More]
UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers find therapeutic target for treatment of acute spinal cord injuries

UAB researchers have identified a therapeutic target for the treatment of acute spinal cord injuries. According to this research, conducted on mice, the administration of a drug that prevents loss of myelin - the insulating sheath around nerve fibres that allows signals to be transmitted - increases the mobility of the mice after an injury. [More]
New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

New research may explain why youngsters' recovery times vary widely after traumatic brain injury

Why do some youngsters bounce back quickly from a traumatic brain injury, while others suffer devastating side effects for years? New UCLA/USC research suggests that damage to the fatty sheaths around the brain's nerve fibers--not injury severity-- may explain the difference. Published in the July 15 edition of the Journal of Neuroscience, the finding identifies possible biomarkers that physicians could use to predict higher-risk patients who require closer monitoring. [More]
International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

International research team identifies new gene associated with 4H leukodystrophy

Leukodystrophies are deadly neurodegenerative diseases that affect one in 7,000 children and remain incurable. These genetic diseases attack myelin or the "insulating rubber sheath" surrounding neurons, which leads to deteriorating health for affected children. [More]
Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

Wayne State University awarded grant to explore new MS pathology model

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has provided a grant to a Wayne State University School of Medicine professor to explore a new model of MS pathology. [More]
Long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication benefits people with schizophrenia

Long-acting injectable antipsychotic medication benefits people with schizophrenia

Schizophrenia, which affects 2 million to 3 million people in the U.S., causes hallucinations, delusions and disorganization. Left untreated, the disease can cause a significant loss in quality of life, including unemployment and estrangement from loved ones. But many people with schizophrenia can control the disorder and live without symptoms for several years if they consistently take prescribed antipsychotic medication, typically a daily pill. [More]
Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Biotin benefits ‘clinically relevant’ in progressive multiple sclerosis

Patients with progressive multiple sclerosis and their clinicians see clear improvements during treatment with a high dose of biotin, show further results from the phase III trial of the therapy. [More]
MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay, a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of nervous system disorders, reports additional positive data from its pivotal Phase III clinical trial, MS-SPI, with MD1003, a highly-concentrated pharmaceutical grade biotin, in patients with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. [More]
Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Johns Hopkins researchers develop new imaging technology to help remove brain tumors safely

Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumor, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. [More]
Updated My MS Manager mobile phone app helps individuals with MS better manage their disease

Updated My MS Manager mobile phone app helps individuals with MS better manage their disease

My MS Manager, the first-of-its kind mobile phone app created by the Multiple Sclerosis Association of America to help individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) better manage their disease, now offers new features including a way to connect and share information with one's physician. [More]
Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

A drug that could halt the progression of multiple sclerosis may soon be developed thanks to a discovery by a team at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The researchers have identified a molecule called MCAM, and they have shown that blocking this molecule could delay the onset of the disease and significantly slow its progression. [More]
UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

UAB opens third multidisciplinary clinic for transverse myelitis

Mike Jezdimir knows firsthand how hard it is to get appropriate medical treatment for his condition, a disease of the spinal cord called transverse myelitis. He has had it for 48 years, since he was 17. TM is fairly uncommon, and many physicians rarely encounter it. Treatment options are limited. [More]
UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis researchers settle long-standing controversy surrounding Canavan disease

UC Davis investigators have settled a long-standing controversy surrounding the molecular basis of an inherited disorder that historically affected Ashkenazi Jews from Eastern Europe but now also arises in other populations of Semitic descent, particularly families from Saudi Arabia. [More]
Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

Several drugs could lead to new MS treatment options

New research published this week in Nature has found several drugs could lead to new treatment options for multiple sclerosis (MS), including two drugs that effectively treat MS at the source, in vivo. When administered at the peak of disease, these two drugs showed a striking reversal of disease severity. [More]
Scientists identify protein that could help tame severe inflammation

Scientists identify protein that could help tame severe inflammation

Researchers have identified a protein that offers a new focus for developing targeted therapies to tame the severe inflammation associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), colitis and other autoimmune disorders. [More]
Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis

A pair of topical medicines already alleviating skin conditions each may prove to have another, even more compelling use: instructing stem cells in the brain to reverse damage caused by multiple sclerosis. [More]
Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two drugs already on the market -- an antifungal and a steroid -- may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study published in Nature today, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. [More]
National MS Society commits $28 million to support new MS research projects, training awards

National MS Society commits $28 million to support new MS research projects, training awards

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has committed $28 million to support an expected 84 new MS research projects and training awards. These are part of a comprehensive research strategy aimed at stopping MS, restoring function that has been lost, and ending the disease forever – for every single person with MS. [More]
A new approach to TBI therapy

A new approach to TBI therapy

Innovative angles of attack in research that focus on how the human brain protects and repairs itself will help develop treatments for one of the most common, costly, deadly and scientifically frustrating medical conditions worldwide: traumatic brain injury. [More]
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