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Myelin is the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves.
Scientists find new signal pathway that plays vital role in learning, processing of sensory input

Scientists find new signal pathway that plays vital role in learning, processing of sensory input

Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have discovered a new signal pathway in the brain that plays an important role in learning and the processing of sensory input. It was already known that distinct glial cells receive information from neurons. [More]
Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

Study reveals how the human brain heals itself after surgical removal of brain tumor

An interdisciplinary team of neuroscientists and neurosurgeons from the University of Rochester has used a new imaging technique to show how the human brain heals itself in just a few weeks following surgical removal of a brain tumor. [More]
NYSCF, CMTA partner to advance research on genetic neuropathies

NYSCF, CMTA partner to advance research on genetic neuropathies

The New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute, a non-profit organization dedicated to accelerating cures through stem cell research, announced a collaboration today with the Charcot-Marie-Tooth Association, a patient-led disease foundation with the mission to advance research on genetic neuropathies that leads to the development of new therapies. [More]
Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

Tobacco smoke toxin could increase pain in people with spinal cord injury

A neurotoxin called acrolein found in tobacco smoke that is thought to increase pain in people with spinal cord injury has now been shown to accumulate in mice exposed to the equivalent of 12 cigarettes daily over a short time period. [More]
Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Ligand indazole chloride improves motor function, study shows

Multiple sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease of the brain and spinal cord, affects about 2.3 million people worldwide (400,000 in the United States). Affecting more women than men, it can be seen at any age, although it is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 40. [More]
Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

Researchers identify key protein that can reduce severity of disease equivalent to MS in mice

In multiple sclerosis, the immune system goes rogue, improperly attacking the body's own central nervous system. Mobility problems and cognitive impairments may arise as the nerve cells become damaged. [More]
Cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function may contribute to migraine headaches

Cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function may contribute to migraine headaches

A new study shows cellular-level changes in nerve structure and function that may contribute to the development of migraine headaches, reports the November issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). [More]
Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Teen binge drinking effects may last a lifetime, suggests UMass Amherst study

Binge drinking can have lasting effects on brain pathways that are still developing during adolescence, say neuroscience researcher Heather N. Richardson and her colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Louisiana State University. [More]
Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Growth factor boosts natural defence against auto-immune diseases

Our immune system defends us from harmful bacteria and viruses, but, if left unchecked, the cells that destroy those invaders can turn on the body itself, causing auto-immune diseases like type-1 diabetes or multiple sclerosis. A molecule called insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) boosts the body's natural defence against this 'friendly fire', scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Monterotondo, Italy, have found. [More]
OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

OMRF scientist selected to receive EMD Serono's Grant for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation

An Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation scientist has been selected to receive one of only five Grants for Multiple Sclerosis Innovation awarded this year by the pharmaceutical company EMD Serono. [More]
Vesicles play significant role in the functioning of neurons

Vesicles play significant role in the functioning of neurons

Tiny vesicles containing protective substances which they transmit to nerve cells apparently play an important role in the functioning of neurons. As cell biologists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have discovered, nerve cells can enlist the aid of mini-vesicles of neighboring glial cells to defend themselves against stress and other potentially detrimental factors. [More]
Placenta-derived cells are safe for MS patients

Placenta-derived cells are safe for MS patients

Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) were able to safely tolerate treatment with cells cultured from human placental tissue, according to a study published today in the journal Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders. [More]
People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis lose myelin in gray matter

People with multiple sclerosis (MS) lose myelin in the gray matter of their brains and the loss is closely correlated with the severity of the disease, according to a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. [More]
Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life receives SBIR program grant to fund Phase 2a proof-of-concept study for MS

Transparency Life Sciences, LLC (TLS), the world's first clinical-stage drug development company based on open innovation, today announced that it has received a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program grant to fund a Phase 2a proof-of-concept study testing the utility of the ACE inhibitor lisinopril as an adjunctive therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). [More]
New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

New MS treatment found safe, tolerable in phase I clinical trials

A new treatment under investigation for multiple sclerosis (MS) is safe and tolerable in phase I clinical trials, according to a study published August 27, 2014, in Neurology Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, a new online-only, freely accessible, specialty medical journal. [More]
Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

Research examines evidence of damage to hearing

New research examines evidence of damage to your hearing. Many people listen to loud music without realizing that this can affect their hearing. [More]
Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

Study identifies novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity linked with MS

A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology identifies a novel gene that controls nerve conduction velocity. [More]
Researcher highlights potential for interaction between key CNS plasticity mechanisms

Researcher highlights potential for interaction between key CNS plasticity mechanisms

The adult CNS is remarkably adaptable - it retains the ability to generate and integrate new cells, and remodel pre-existing circuits. [More]
Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Small molecule may be able to convince damaged nerves to effectively rewire circuits

Frogs, dogs, whales, snails can all do it, but humans and primates can't. Regrow nerves after an injury, that is—while many animals have this ability, humans don't. [More]
Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

Kids are at risk of biological damage results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices

A scholarly article on wireless safety, published online in the Journal of Microscopy and Ultrastructure, reports that children and fetuses are the most at risk from neurological and biological damage that results from microwave radiation emitted by wireless devices, due to the higher rate of absorption of microwave radiation by children than by adults. [More]