Myelin News and Research RSS Feed - Myelin News and Research

Myelin is the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves.
LA BioMed receives grant to study role of serum Vitamin A in people with multiple sclerosis

LA BioMed receives grant to study role of serum Vitamin A in people with multiple sclerosis

Some 2.5 million people around the world have multiple sclerosis (MS), a potentially debilitating disease in which the body's immune system destroys the protective sheath (myelin) that covers nerves. [More]
Combination of NGF microspheres and chitosan conduits exhibit better effects in repairing facial nerve injury

Combination of NGF microspheres and chitosan conduits exhibit better effects in repairing facial nerve injury

The chitosan molecule can promote nerve cell adherence and growth along the surface of the material. It can enhance the adherence and influx of Schwann cells, thus encouraging the growth of axons. [More]
MitoQ antioxidant reverses MS-like disease in animal

MitoQ antioxidant reverses MS-like disease in animal

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have discovered that an antioxidant designed more than a dozen years ago to fight damage within human cells significantly helps symptoms in mice that have a multiple sclerosis-like disease. [More]
New MRI approach can be important tool for diagnosing, tracking MS progression

New MRI approach can be important tool for diagnosing, tracking MS progression

New imaging research from Western University (London, Canada) has demonstrated that a magnetic resonance imaging approach called quantitative susceptibility mapping can be an important tool for diagnosing and tracking the progression of Multiple Sclerosis and other neurological diseases. [More]
MSCs isolated from MS patients have decreased suppressive function

MSCs isolated from MS patients have decreased suppressive function

Multiple sclerosis, an inflammatory autoimmune disease affecting more than one million people worldwide, is caused by an immune reaction to myelin proteins, the proteins that help form the myelin insulating substance around nerves. Demyelination and MS are a consequence of this immune reaction. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells have been considered as an important source for cell therapy for autoimmune diseases such as MS because of their immunosuppressive properties. [More]
Study offers new insight into benefits of vitamin D in people with multiple sclerosis

Study offers new insight into benefits of vitamin D in people with multiple sclerosis

In mice with a rodent form of multiple sclerosis (MS), vitamin D appears to block damage-causing immune cells from migrating to the central nervous system, offering a potential explanation for why the so-called "sunshine vitamin" may prevent or ease symptoms of the neurodegenerative disease, according to results of a study at Johns Hopkins. [More]
Penn researchers identify protein that could clear Alzheimer's plaques

Penn researchers identify protein that could clear Alzheimer's plaques

The body is structured to ensure that any invading organisms have a tough time reaching the brain, an organ obviously critical to survival. Known as the blood-brain barrier, cells that line the brain and spinal cord are tightly packed, making it difficult for anything besides very small molecules to cross from the bloodstream into the central nervous system. While beneficial, this blockade also stands in the way of delivering drugs intended to treat neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's. [More]
Gladstone scientist devise new molecular sensor that can detect MS at earliest stages

Gladstone scientist devise new molecular sensor that can detect MS at earliest stages

For some, the disease multiple sclerosis attacks its victims slowly and progressively over a period of many years. For others, it strikes without warning in fits and starts. But all patients share one thing in common: the disease had long been present in their nervous systems, hiding under the radar from even the most sophisticated detection methods. But now, scientists at the Gladstone Institutes have devised a new molecular sensor that can detect MS at its earliest stages-even before the onset of physical signs. [More]
International researchers report significant findings on vascular abnormality outside the brain

International researchers report significant findings on vascular abnormality outside the brain

Studies on Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia have long focused on what's happening inside the brain. Now an international research team studying Alzheimer's and mild cognitive impairment is reporting potentially significant findings on a vascular abnormality outside the brain. [More]
Study: Connections in the brain become stronger during sleep as children age

Study: Connections in the brain become stronger during sleep as children age

While young children sleep, connections between the left and the right hemispheres of their brain strengthen, which may help brain functions mature, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Multiple sclerosis researchers receive NMSS drug development grant

Multiple sclerosis researchers receive NMSS drug development grant

A $500,000 drug development grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society was awarded to a partnership between a multiple sclerosis research team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Karyopharm Therapeutics Inc., a clinical stage pharmaceutical company. Dr. Patrizia Casaccia, MD, PhD, Professor in the Departments of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will be the academic lead. [More]
Study finds patients with focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains

Study finds patients with focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains

Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Revalesio to conduct RNS60 Phase IIa clinical trial in RRMS patients

Revalesio to conduct RNS60 Phase IIa clinical trial in RRMS patients

Revalesio Corporation is pleased to announce a new collaboration with noted neurologist Dr. Roland Martin, Head of Neuroimmunology and MS Research at the Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich. Dr. Martin will be conducting a Phase IIa clinical trial of RNS60 in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatments, approaches for controlling multiple sclerosis

Research findings may lead to new treatments, approaches for controlling multiple sclerosis

Scientists are gaining a new level of understanding of multiple sclerosis that may lead to new treatments and approaches to controlling the chronic disease, according to new research released today at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. [More]
ImmunGene secures $9 million in Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group

ImmunGene secures $9 million in Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group

ImmunGene, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on developing antibody-cytokine fusion technology therapies to treat cancer, today announced it has secured $9 million in a milestone-based Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group. Previous investments in the Company were converted into Series A preferred stock. ImmunGene will use the capital to advance its early-stage development products to IND-enabling studies. [More]
Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

In an article appearing in Medical Hypotheses on September 20, a New York-based physician-researcher from the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine has called for the testing of umbilical cord blood for levels of a growth protein that could help predict an infant's propensity to later develop autism. [More]
Researchers identify C. perfringens type B bacteria believed to trigger multiple sclerosis

Researchers identify C. perfringens type B bacteria believed to trigger multiple sclerosis

A research team from Weill Cornell Medical College and The Rockefeller University has identified a bacterium it believes may trigger multiple sclerosis, a chronic, debilitating disorder that damages myelin forming cells in the brain and spinal cord. [More]
TSRI scientists identify set of compounds to treat multiple sclerosis in new way

TSRI scientists identify set of compounds to treat multiple sclerosis in new way

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a set of compounds that may be used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) in a new way. Unlike existing MS therapies that suppress the immune system, the compounds boost a population of progenitor cells that can in turn repair MS-damaged nerve fibers. [More]
Researchers study link between newborn infections and later behavior problems

Researchers study link between newborn infections and later behavior problems

Researchers exploring the link between newborn infections and later behavior and movement problems have found that inflammation in the brain keeps cells from accessing iron that they need to perform a critical role in brain development. [More]
Resveratrol worsens MS-like neuropathology and inflammation, study finds

Resveratrol worsens MS-like neuropathology and inflammation, study finds

Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol compound produced by the skin of red grapes and peanuts, and found in red wine, has been touted as a beneficial supplement due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. [More]