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Myelin is the fatty substance that covers and protects nerves.

Study: Connections in the brain become stronger during sleep as children age

While young children sleep, connections between the left and the right hemispheres of their brain strengthen, which may help brain functions mature, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. [More]
Multiple sclerosis researchers receive NMSS drug development grant

Multiple sclerosis researchers receive NMSS drug development grant

A $500,000 drug development grant from the National Multiple Sclerosis Society was awarded to a partnership between a multiple sclerosis research team at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Karyopharm Therapeutics Inc., a clinical stage pharmaceutical company. Dr. Patrizia Casaccia, MD, PhD, Professor in the Departments of Neuroscience and Genetics and Genomics, at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will be the academic lead. [More]

Study finds patients with focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains

Patients with the most common form of focal epilepsy have widespread, abnormal connections in their brains that could provide clues toward diagnosis and treatment, according to a new study published online in the journal Radiology. [More]
Revalesio to conduct RNS60 Phase IIa clinical trial in RRMS patients

Revalesio to conduct RNS60 Phase IIa clinical trial in RRMS patients

Revalesio Corporation is pleased to announce a new collaboration with noted neurologist Dr. Roland Martin, Head of Neuroimmunology and MS Research at the Department of Neurology, University Hospital Zurich. Dr. Martin will be conducting a Phase IIa clinical trial of RNS60 in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatments, approaches for controlling multiple sclerosis

Research findings may lead to new treatments, approaches for controlling multiple sclerosis

Scientists are gaining a new level of understanding of multiple sclerosis that may lead to new treatments and approaches to controlling the chronic disease, according to new research released today at Neuroscience 2013, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. [More]
ImmunGene secures $9 million in Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group

ImmunGene secures $9 million in Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group

ImmunGene, Inc., a biotechnology company focused on developing antibody-cytokine fusion technology therapies to treat cancer, today announced it has secured $9 million in a milestone-based Series A financing from Ally Bridge Group. Previous investments in the Company were converted into Series A preferred stock. ImmunGene will use the capital to advance its early-stage development products to IND-enabling studies. [More]

Study: Increased duration of breastfeeding could be associated with decreased incidence of autism

In an article appearing in Medical Hypotheses on September 20, a New York-based physician-researcher from the Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine has called for the testing of umbilical cord blood for levels of a growth protein that could help predict an infant's propensity to later develop autism. [More]
Researchers identify C. perfringens type B bacteria believed to trigger multiple sclerosis

Researchers identify C. perfringens type B bacteria believed to trigger multiple sclerosis

A research team from Weill Cornell Medical College and The Rockefeller University has identified a bacterium it believes may trigger multiple sclerosis, a chronic, debilitating disorder that damages myelin forming cells in the brain and spinal cord. [More]
TSRI scientists identify set of compounds to treat multiple sclerosis in new way

TSRI scientists identify set of compounds to treat multiple sclerosis in new way

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a set of compounds that may be used to treat multiple sclerosis (MS) in a new way. Unlike existing MS therapies that suppress the immune system, the compounds boost a population of progenitor cells that can in turn repair MS-damaged nerve fibers. [More]
Researchers study link between newborn infections and later behavior problems

Researchers study link between newborn infections and later behavior problems

Researchers exploring the link between newborn infections and later behavior and movement problems have found that inflammation in the brain keeps cells from accessing iron that they need to perform a critical role in brain development. [More]
Resveratrol worsens MS-like neuropathology and inflammation, study finds

Resveratrol worsens MS-like neuropathology and inflammation, study finds

Resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol compound produced by the skin of red grapes and peanuts, and found in red wine, has been touted as a beneficial supplement due to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. [More]
Biochemists discover promising vitamin D-based treatment that halts or reverse MS

Biochemists discover promising vitamin D-based treatment that halts or reverse MS

A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a hard lot. Patients typically get the diagnosis around age 30 after experiencing a series of neurological problems such as blurry vision, wobbly gait or a numb foot. From there, this neurodegenerative disease follows an unforgiving course. [More]

Biochemists discover promising vitamin D-based treatment that can halt MS

A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is a hard lot. Patients typically get the diagnosis around age 30 after experiencing a series of neurological problems such as blurry vision, wobbly gait or a numb foot. From there, this neurodegenerative disease follows an unforgiving course. [More]
First Direct Measurement Of Spinal Cord Myelin In MS

First Direct Measurement Of Spinal Cord Myelin In MS

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Researchers develop first imaging tool to examine myelin damage in MS

Researchers develop first imaging tool to examine myelin damage in MS

Researchers have made an exciting breakthrough - developing a first-of-its-kind imaging tool to examine myelin damage in multiple sclerosis (MS). An extremely difficult disease to diagnose, the tool will help physicians diagnose patients earlier, monitor the disease's progression, and evaluate therapy efficacy. [More]

Wayne State University initiates groundbreaking multiple sclerosis study

A groundbreaking study in multiple sclerosis focusing on "remyelination in the brain" has been initiated by Omar Khan, M.D., professor and chair of neurology at the Wayne State University School of Medicine. [More]
University of Chicago researchers awarded NIH grant to develop novel multiple sclerosis treatment

University of Chicago researchers awarded NIH grant to develop novel multiple sclerosis treatment

Researchers from the University of Chicago have been awarded a five-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop stimulated dendritic cell-derived exosomes that show remarkable promise as a treatment for multiple sclerosis and other neurological diseases involving loss of myelin, the insulation around nerve fibers. [More]

UCSF neuroscientist wins Barancik Prize for multiple sclerosis research

Neuroscientist Jonah Chan, PhD, at the University of California, San Francisco, is the first recipient of a new international prize launched to recognize innovation and progress in multiple sclerosis research. [More]

Research: Treatment with antioxidants may help reduce behavioral issues linked to NF1

New research in mouse models suggests that treatment with antioxidants may help reduce behavioral issues linked to the genetic nervous system disorder Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) and an associated condition called Costello syndrome. [More]
Rutgers scientist finds important clue on origins of multiple sclerosis

Rutgers scientist finds important clue on origins of multiple sclerosis

The search for the cause of multiple sclerosis, a debilitating disease that affects up to a half million people in the United States, has confounded researchers and medical professionals for generations. But Steven Schutzer, a physician and scientist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, has now found an important clue why progress has been slow - it appears that most research on the origins of MS has focused on the wrong part of the brain. [More]