Nausea News and Research RSS Feed - Nausea News and Research

Nausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach and head with an urge to vomit. An attack of nausea is known as a qualm.
New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor (TCR) therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT). [More]
Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Tips to prevent, treat black widow and brown recluse spider bites

Most spiders are non-venomous and most spider bites are harmless. They may cause some local redness and pain, but can usually be managed at home by washing, applying ice and keeping the area clean. [More]
Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

Mothers with chemical intolerances more likely to have children with ASD or ADHD

A new study from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio found that mothers with chemical intolerances are two to three times more likely than other women to have a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). [More]
Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan announces U.S. availability of SAPHRIS 2.5 mg tablets for children with bipolar I disorder

Allergan plc today announced that SAPHRIS (asenapine) 2.5 mg sublingual (placed under the tongue) black-cherry flavored tablets are available in pharmacies throughout the U.S. In March 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved SAPHRIS for the acute treatment of manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in pediatric patients (ages 10 – 17). [More]
SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU pain researcher Daniela Salvemini has been awarded the NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) to solve an alarming problem: pain killers that are capable of quelling terrible pain also carry debilitating side effects and significant risk of addiction. [More]
Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Johns Hopkins endocrinologists propose new protocol for inpatient glucose management

Borrowing a page from a winning team’s playbook, Johns Hopkins endocrinologist Nestoras Mathioudakis, M.D., and his colleagues are taking on the topic of managing hospital patients’ diabetes. [More]
Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes releases Android version of Glucagon Mobile App to support diabetes caregivers

Lilly Diabetes has released an Android version of its mobile application designed for caregivers and healthcare providers who support people with diabetes. Through an injection tutorial and emergency instructions, the App can help people practice the injection steps ahead of time, which may help them feel better prepared to assist. [More]
Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

Innovation in anaesthesia: an interview with Matti Lehtonen, GE Healthcare

The spectrum of patients seen today, from pre-term infants to the morbidly obese to the longer living elderly, is wider than ever before and increasingly more challenging with patients often presenting with multiple co-morbidities. This puts a huge strain on healthcare providers who are facing increasing challenges such as cost pressure and staff shortages. [More]
Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers launch world's first viral therapy clinical trial to attack and kill cancer cells

Canadian researchers have launched the world's first clinical trial of a novel investigational therapy that uses a combination of two viruses to attack and kill cancer cells, and stimulate an anti-cancer immune response. Previous research by this team and others worldwide suggests that this approach could be very powerful, and could have fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy and radiation, although it will take years to rigorously test through this trial and others. [More]
IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) approved in Europe for treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia

Today AbbVie announced the European Commission granted marketing authorization for IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) as the first treatment option available in all 28 member states of the European Union for the treatment of Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare, slow growing blood cancer, in adult patients who have received at least one prior therapy, or in first line treatment for patients unsuitable for chemo-immunotherapy. [More]
New guidelines seek to protect athletes from exercise-associated hyponatremia

New guidelines seek to protect athletes from exercise-associated hyponatremia

While the risks of dehydration are well known, new international guidelines seek to protect athletes from the serious health risks associated with drinking too many fluids while exercising. [More]
Penn State Hershey cardiologist explains causes and symptoms of heart attack

Penn State Hershey cardiologist explains causes and symptoms of heart attack

It's possible to have a heart attack and not even know it. Maybe it's because you're stoic when it comes to pain and fatigue. Or maybe you write off your symptoms as heartburn or indigestion. It's even possible that your own body is kicking up its reserves to mask symptoms of what is happening inside. [More]
International consensus panel reviews new diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

International consensus panel reviews new diagnostic criteria for neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

New diagnostic criteria were introduced this week for neuromyelitis optica, now called neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder, which is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that is sometimes mistaken for multiple sclerosis. [More]
New research reveals why some kids can have severe allergic reaction hours later

New research reveals why some kids can have severe allergic reaction hours later

Parents of kids with severe allergies know how scary a severe allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) is. New research offers clues as to why some kids can have a second, related reaction hours later - and what to do about it. [More]
Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics, a developer of innovative pharmaceuticals, announced today initiation of enrollment and dosing of the first subject in a Phase 1a clinical study of ABX-1431, a first-in-class, investigational endocannabinoid system modulator. [More]
Tests reveal that FY26 cancer drug is 49 times more potent than Cisplatin drug

Tests reveal that FY26 cancer drug is 49 times more potent than Cisplatin drug

Tests have shown that a new cancer drug, FY26, is 49 times more potent than the clinically used treatment Cisplatin. [More]
Allergan agrees to acquire exclusive worldwide rights to Merck's CGRP migraine development program

Allergan agrees to acquire exclusive worldwide rights to Merck's CGRP migraine development program

Allergan plc and Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that they have entered into an agreement under which Allergan will acquire the exclusive worldwide rights to Merck's investigational small molecule oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists, which are being developed for the treatment and prevention of migraine, subject to expiration or termination of the waiting period under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (HSR). [More]
NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

NIH-sponsored clinical trial evaluates new investigational vaccine against West Nile Virus infection

A clinical trial of a new investigational vaccine designed to protect against West Nile Virus infection will be sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. [More]
MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

MIT researchers reveal key brainwave changes among patients receiving nitrous oxide

Nitrous oxide, commonly known as "laughing gas," has been used in anesthesiology practice since the 1800s, but the way it works to create altered states is not well understood. In a study published this week in Clinical Neurophysiology, MIT researchers reveal some key brainwave changes among patients receiving the drug. [More]
Paclitaxel-fostamatinib combination therapy may reduce size of ovarian cancer cells

Paclitaxel-fostamatinib combination therapy may reduce size of ovarian cancer cells

Working in cell cultures and mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins have found that an experimental drug called fostamatinib combined with the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel may overcome ovarian cancer cells' resistance to paclitaxel. [More]
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