Nausea News and Research RSS Feed - Nausea News and Research

Nausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort in the upper stomach and head with an urge to vomit. An attack of nausea is known as a qualm.
Drug combination therapy delays progression of advanced breast cancer without side effects, study shows

Drug combination therapy delays progression of advanced breast cancer without side effects, study shows

Building on earlier clinical trials, UCLA researchers have confirmed that the "breakthrough" drug palbociclib when used in combination with the traditional hormonal therapy letrozole delays progression of advanced breast cancer significantly and without the harsh side effects seen in some women prescribed letrozole alone. [More]
West Nile virus may cause delayed fatalities long after recovery, new study finds

West Nile virus may cause delayed fatalities long after recovery, new study finds

West Nile virus may be much more deadly than previously believed, with deaths attributable to the mosquito-borne disease occurring not just in the immediate aftermath of the infection but also years later, long after patients seem to have recovered from the initial illness, according to a new study presented today at the 2016 Meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) [More]
Virginia Tech and CytImmune Sciences develop more effective and less toxic cancer treatment

Virginia Tech and CytImmune Sciences develop more effective and less toxic cancer treatment

Virginia Tech scientists have developed a new cancer drug that uses gold nanoparticles created by the biotech firm CytImmune Sciences to deliver paclitaxel — a commonly used chemotherapy drug directly to a tumor. [More]
Intensive multidisciplinary intervention holds benefit for children with pediatric feeding disorders

Intensive multidisciplinary intervention holds benefit for children with pediatric feeding disorders

A new study finds positive outcomes associated with intensive multidisciplinary treatment for children with pediatric feeding disorder who may require a feeding tube to support growth and development. [More]
Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan launches first and only oral contraceptive in softgel capsule for prevention of pregnancy

Allergan plc, a leading global pharmaceutical company, today announced the availability of TAYTULLA (norethindrone acetate and ethinyl estradiol capsules and ferrous fumarate capsules), 1mg/20mcg, the first and only oral contraceptive in a softgel capsule for the prevention of pregnancy [More]
TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

TTUHSC El Paso investigators receive $1.8 million grant to support digestive disorder research

Co-principal investigators Richard McCallum, M.D., and Irene Sarosiek, M.D., have received a five-year, $1.8 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. [More]
Gas-filled balloon capsules provide new low risk treatment option for patients with obesity

Gas-filled balloon capsules provide new low risk treatment option for patients with obesity

Patients with obesity who swallowed gas-filled balloon capsules designed to help them eat less, lost 1.9 times more weight than patients who relied on diet, exercise and lifestyle therapy alone, according to new research presented today at ObesityWeek 2016, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Nephrologists uncover link between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease

Nephrologists uncover link between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease

Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease. [More]
New quality improvement program reduces hospital readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients

New quality improvement program reduces hospital readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients

While the average hospital saw 30-day readmission rates for weight-loss surgery patients drop by about 14 percent, some hospitals had reductions as much as 32 percent after implementing a new quality improvement program, according to new research presented today at ObesityWeek 2016, the largest international event focused on the basic science, clinical application and prevention and treatment of obesity. [More]
Impulsive meth users more likely to have started taking drug at earlier age, study shows

Impulsive meth users more likely to have started taking drug at earlier age, study shows

Methamphetamine users who described themselves as impulsive were more likely to have started taking the drug at an earlier age, a study of more than 150 users showed. [More]
Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance more likely to experience high pain levels in PACU, study finds

Patients using public health insurance were more likely to experience high pain levels in the post anesthesia care unit following surgery to remove their tonsils and/or adenoids, according to a study presented at the ANESTHESIOLOGY 2016 annual meeting. [More]
FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

FDA approves new therapy for initial treatment of soft tissue sarcoma

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Lartruvo (olaratumab) with doxorubicin to treat adults with certain types of soft tissue sarcoma (STS), which are cancers that develop in muscles, fat, tendons or other soft tissues. [More]
CAPES program helps patients tell children about their illnesses

CAPES program helps patients tell children about their illnesses

There was no question that Nancy Coronado would tell her two young children everything about her breast cancer diagnosis. She and her husband wanted to keep them informed of all aspects of treatment and care. [More]
Study reveals mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the body to prevent fatal water intoxication

Study reveals mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the body to prevent fatal water intoxication

A multi-institute study led by Monash University has revealed for the first time the mechanism that regulates fluid intake in the human body and stops us from over-drinking, which can cause potentially fatal water intoxication. [More]
Many gay and bisexual men unaware that PrEP medication may reduce HIV risk

Many gay and bisexual men unaware that PrEP medication may reduce HIV risk

Only four in 10 gay and bisexual men in Baltimore without HIV are aware that pre-exposure prophylaxis medication (PrEP) may significantly reduce their risk of contracting the virus, even those who had recently visited a doctor or been tested for a sexually transmitted disease, new Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research suggests. [More]
New type of nanoparticles can deliver chemotherapy efficiently to cancer cells

New type of nanoparticles can deliver chemotherapy efficiently to cancer cells

Engineering researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a new method that delivers chemotherapy directly and efficiently to individual cells. [More]
Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis gets three FDA approvals for expanded use of biologic drug to treat rare autoinflammatory diseases

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted three simultaneous approvals for the expanded use of Ilaris (canakinumab) to treat three rare and distinct types of Periodic Fever Syndromes. [More]
Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

Study finds racial disparities in physical and functional quality of life for breast cancer survivors

An analysis of the quality of life of several thousand breast cancer survivors in North Carolina found differences in how black and white women functioned and felt physically and spiritually during treatment and two years after diagnosis. [More]
UC football team supports brain cancer survivor

UC football team supports brain cancer survivor

In 2009, Mitch Stone was 11 when he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. He went through very aggressive treatments at Cincinnati Children's. [More]
Discrimination experienced by overweight adolescents can lead to increased emotional problems

Discrimination experienced by overweight adolescents can lead to increased emotional problems

Discrimination and bullying experienced by sixth graders who are overweight leads to increased emotional problems by the end of eighth grade, according to new research published in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, a journal of the Society of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement