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Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

Smartphone app may increase discharge preparedness for parents of VLBW infants

A smartphone app specifically designed to support parents of very low birth weight (VLBW) premature infants as they transition home from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may increase parenting self-efficacy and discharge preparedness, according to a pilot randomized controlled trial at Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago that was published in the journal Internet Interventions. [More]
Radiometer launches the next generation of transcutaneous monitoring

Radiometer launches the next generation of transcutaneous monitoring

Radiometer has unveiled its CE-marked TCM5 transcutaneous monitor, addressing the critical care needs of neonatal, pediatric and adult patients, as well as sleep clinic and home care environments. [More]
Infection prevention bundles effective for reducing CLABSIs in critical care newborns

Infection prevention bundles effective for reducing CLABSIs in critical care newborns

Infection prevention bundles, a package of evidence-based guidelines implemented in unison, are effective for reducing central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSI) in critical care newborn infants, according to a new study published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. [More]
Use of next-generation gene sequencing in NICUs may improve diagnosis of rare diseases

Use of next-generation gene sequencing in NICUs may improve diagnosis of rare diseases

The use of next-generation gene sequencing in newborns in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) may improve the diagnosis of rare diseases and deliver results more quickly to anxious families, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). [More]
National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to target proteins that drive cancer

The National Cancer Moonshot initiative needs to move beyond genomics to target the proteins that are driving cancer, according to an Inova Health System and George Mason University collaborative paper published Thursday in the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Studies explore possible link between pediatric cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice

Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose jaundice is likely to resolve on its own, a pediatric oncologist from Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center argues in an editorial published today by the journal Pediatrics. [More]
New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

New lab blood test may help identify HELLP syndrome in pregnant women

A laboratory blood test developed at Johns Hopkins for the diagnosis of a rare genetic red blood cell disorder also shows promise in identifying HELLP syndrome, a life-threatening high blood pressure condition affecting 1 percent of all pregnant women that causes hypertension along with end organ damage, researchers report in the May issue of the journal Experimental Hematology. [More]
Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

Innovative technology in NICU can predict risk of major infections in premature or critically ill babies

A new technology in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at UC San Diego Health is able to predict the risk of life-threatening infections up to 24 hours before they appear in severely premature or critically ill infants. Infection is the leading cause of death in this fragile patient population. [More]
Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding breast milk during first month of life may spur brain growth in preterm infants

Feeding premature babies mostly breast milk during the first month of life appears to spur more robust brain growth, compared with babies given little or no breast milk. [More]
Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Acid suppression drugs frequently prescribed for high-risk newborns, study shows

Since 2006, several published studies have associated the use of some acid suppression medications in hospitalized high-risk babies with infections, necrotizing enterocolitis and increased risk of death. Those medications - histamine-2 receptor antagonists, such as ranitidine (Zantac and others), and proton pump inhibitors, such as esomeprazole (Nexium and others) - were originally approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in adults and older children. [More]
Researchers propose new method for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants

Researchers propose new method for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants

A research group led by Kobe University Professor MORIOKA Ichiro (Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics), Associate Professor OSAWA Kayo (Graduate School of Health Sciences, Department of Biophysics), and Clinical Technologist SATO Itsuko (Kobe University Hospital, Department of Clinical Laboratory) is proposing a new criterion for diagnosis of bacterial infection in preterm infants. [More]
Simple tips to help parents and children lead a healthy life

Simple tips to help parents and children lead a healthy life

Obesity is almost at epidemic proportions; it has more than doubled in children and tripled in adolescents in the past 30 years nationwide. Rosa Cataldo, DO, MPH, Director of the Healthy Weight & Wellness Center at Stony Brook Children's Hospital, says that the most effective approach to addressing weight loss in children are lifestyle-based modifications that involve parents. [More]
Researchers examine effects of family-centred neonatal discharge planning process

Researchers examine effects of family-centred neonatal discharge planning process

Researchers from the University of Bristol have found new parents benefit from help to prepare them to bring their premature babies home from hospital. [More]
Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

Gut microbial imbalance appears to be underlying cause of fatal intestinal illness in premature babies

An imbalance of certain gut microbes appears to be the underlying cause of a frequently fatal intestinal illness in premature babies, according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis [More]
Steroid use in late preterm delivery can reduce rate of neonatal respiratory complications

Steroid use in late preterm delivery can reduce rate of neonatal respiratory complications

Current recommendations are for all women who go into labor prior to 34 weeks gestation to be given antenatal corticosteroids (betamethasone) to help mature the baby's lungs. However, many babies born in the late preterm period - between 34 and 36 weeks gestation - require respiratory support at birth. [More]
Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

Severe anemia associated with increased risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in premature infants

A study from Emory University School of Medicine published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has found that severe anemia, but not red blood cell transfusions (RBC), is associated with an increased risk for a potentially fatal intestinal condition in premature infants. [More]
Study demonstrating link between anal cancer and HPV infection published in Obstetrics & Gynecology

Study demonstrating link between anal cancer and HPV infection published in Obstetrics & Gynecology

Researchers at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, recently published the results of a study demonstrating a connection between anal cancer and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. [More]
Study finds gender differences in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists

Study finds gender differences in scholarly productivity among academic gynecologic oncologists

The differences between men and women seem to infiltrate yet another aspect of medicine with a study spearheaded at Women & Infants Hospital, a Care New England hospital, indicating that younger female gynecologic oncologists were less productive scholastically and, therefore, poorly represented in the higher academic ranks, than their male contemporaries. [More]
Simulation training for prenatal and neonatal emergencies: an interview with Clive Patrickson

Simulation training for prenatal and neonatal emergencies: an interview with Clive Patrickson

It's difficult to practice skills on preterm babies who are in neonatal intensive care units (NICU). The complications associated with preterm babies can be varied and infrequent, making it hard for staff to develop their skills set. [More]
Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Researchers reveal inherited genetic mutations associated with ovarian cancer risk

Previous research has established a link between genetic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes to an increased risk of developing ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer in women. [More]
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