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Study shows that home births lead to higher infant mortality among Dutch women living in poorer areas

Study shows that home births lead to higher infant mortality among Dutch women living in poorer areas

Home births lead to higher infant mortality than hospital births, at least for mothers living in poorer areas. This is the conclusion of a new study conducted by N. Meltem Daysal (University of Southern Denmark and IZA), Mircea Trandafir (University of Southern Denmark and IZA) and Reyn van Ewijk (VU University Amsterdam and University of Mainz) that examines 356,412 low-risk Dutch women who delivered between 2000 and 2008 and who were allowed to choose between a home and a hospital birth. [More]
UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

UChicago, Argonne National Laboratory and USF to jointly study gut microbiomes of premature infants

Scientists have suspected that this initial disruption is linked to health problems down the road—things like autism, asthma, food allergies and autoimmune diseases—but so far they only have circumstantial evidence based on case studies. [More]
Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Study: Distinct naming convention for babies in NICU can reduce wrong-patient errors by almost 40%

Traditionally, babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are temporarily identified by gender and last name, such as Babyboy Jackson or Babygirl Smith, but this naming configuration can result in wrong-patient errors for the fragile newborns. [More]
High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

High-frequency tympanometry testing can help identify middle-ear problems in newborn babies

Screening newborn babies who are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) using a testing process called high-frequency tympanometry can help identify middle-ear problems earlier, according to newly published research from a local team of researchers. [More]
Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Providence Tarzana, CHLA collaborate to provide enhanced care to children in the San Fernando Valley

Children in the San Fernando Valley now have access to an enhanced level of pediatric care, under the terms of an innovative agreement between Providence Tarzana Medical Center and Children's Hospital Los Angeles and its physicians. [More]
Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies who avoid eye contact in early infancy less likely to show symptoms of autism

Premature babies are at an increased risk for developing autism spectrum disorder. But a small study indicates that preemies who avoid eye contact in early infancy are less likely to demonstrate symptoms of autism at age 2 than preemies who maintain eye contact during early interactions, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and accuracy of robot-assisted telemedicine in NICU

Study demonstrates safety and accuracy of robot-assisted telemedicine in NICU

Many hospitals lack the resources and patient volume to employ a round-the-clock, neonatal intensive care specialist to treat their youngest and sickest patients. [More]
Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Study reveals benefit of early screening for vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus among preterm infants

Among extremely preterm infants, early screening for the vascular disorder patent ductus arteriosus before day 3 of life was associated with a lower risk of in-hospital death and pulmonary hemorrhage, but not with differences in other severe complications, according to a study in the June 23/30 issue of JAMA. [More]
Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

Surgeons perform breakthrough operation to separate six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins

On Friday, May 22, an 18-member team of physicians and nurses from Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) and Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led an international collaboration to separate a pair of six-month-old conjoined Haitian twins, the first such operation ever performed on Haitian soil. [More]
Whole genome sequencing can help implement rapid-response infection control protocols

Whole genome sequencing can help implement rapid-response infection control protocols

Whole genome sequencing can quickly isolate the specific strain of bacteria causing an outbreak, identify the source of contamination, and enable rapid infection prevention to stop the spread of infection, according to a study published today. [More]
Women & Infants Hospital awarded $5 million NIH grant to support COBRE for Perinatal Biology

Women & Infants Hospital awarded $5 million NIH grant to support COBRE for Perinatal Biology

Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island has recently received a nearly $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to support an Institutional Development Award Center of Biomedical Research Excellence for Perinatal Biology. [More]
CHLA opens doors of new Encino outpatient care center

CHLA opens doors of new Encino outpatient care center

Children's Hospital Los Angeles opened the doors of its new outpatient care center in Encino today. The pediatric medical facility, Children's Hospital Los Angeles - Encino, will be staffed by physicians who are Board-certified in pediatric specialties and subspecialties, including hematology-oncology, nephrology, neurology, orthopaedics, pediatric surgery and urology. [More]
Discovery Lab enrolls first patient in phase 2a clinical trial of AEROSURF

Discovery Lab enrolls first patient in phase 2a clinical trial of AEROSURF

Discovery Laboratories, Inc., a specialty biotechnology company focused on developing aerosolized KL4 surfactant therapies for respiratory diseases, today reported that the first patient has been enrolled in the next phase of its phase 2a clinical evaluation of AEROSURF, which is designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of higher and repeat doses of aerosolized KL4 surfactant administered to premature infants 29 to 34 weeks gestational age (GA) who are receiving nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), compared to infants receiving nCPAP alone. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
Premature female infants tend to do better than males

Premature female infants tend to do better than males

A new study from Loyola University Medical Center provides further evidence that female infants tend to do better than males when born prematurely. [More]
Study reveals increasing incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome in U.S.

Study reveals increasing incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome in U.S.

An increasing number of babies across the country are born addicted to opioids and require intensive care, according to a study analyzing MEDNAX Clinical Data Warehouse statistics from 299 neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) around the United States. [More]

Western European market for infant care solutions estimated to reach $177.5 million in 2018

The saturated European market for infant care solutions has received fresh impetus from the rising incidence of preterm births. This trend is not only fuelling the demand for neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) devices but also skilled and trained professionals to operate these devices. [More]
AJN honors six of Elsevier's nursing book titles with Book of the Year awards

AJN honors six of Elsevier's nursing book titles with Book of the Year awards

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced today that six of its nursing book titles are recipients of the American Journal of Nursing (AJN) Book of the Year awards. [More]
Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide still being used in preterm neonates despite evidence of short-term benefit

Inhaled Nitric Oxide (iNO) is a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration that is commonly used in term and near-term neonates who have severe respiratory failure caused by pulmonary hypertension. Over the last decade there have been multiple large studies trying to determine a clinical use for iNO in preterm neonates, but despite evidence of short-term benefit, this drug has not been shown to improve long-term outcomes in preemies. [More]
Mallinckrodt enters into definitive agreement to acquire Ikaria

Mallinckrodt enters into definitive agreement to acquire Ikaria

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, and Ikaria, Inc. a privately-held critical care company, announced today that they have entered into a definitive agreement under which a subsidiary of Mallinckrodt will acquire Ikaria, Inc. from a Madison Dearborn-led investor group in a transaction valued at approximately $2.3 billion. [More]
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