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Nephrology is a branch of internal medicine and pediatrics dealing with the study of the function and diseases of the kidney.
Manipulation of NAD could lead to potential therapy for acute kidney injury

Manipulation of NAD could lead to potential therapy for acute kidney injury

Approximately one out of five hospitalized adults and one out of three hospitalized children worldwide experience acute kidney injury, the sudden loss of kidney function. Many different factors, including surgery, chemotherapy or shock, can lead to acute kidney injury, but exactly why the kidneys are so vulnerable to these and other stressors has not been well understood. [More]
Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

Study: Conservative care could be a reasonable choice for selected kidney failure patients

A new study found no significant survival advantage among elderly kidney failure patients who chose dialysis over conservative management. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, indicate that conservative care may be a reasonable choice for selected older patients. [More]
Researchers find new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis

Researchers find new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis

Building upon earlier research, investigators at UT Southwestern Medical Center and their collaborators have identified a new innate immunity pathway that protects mammals from viral oncogenesis, the process by which viruses cause normal cells to become cancerous. [More]
EAF celebrates first anniversary of Brussels Declaration on ADPKD, urges MEPs to unite for better patient care

EAF celebrates first anniversary of Brussels Declaration on ADPKD, urges MEPs to unite for better patient care

On World Kidney Day, leading experts from the European ADPKD Forum today issue a collaborative letter to over 350 European decision makers (European Parliament, European Commission, Council representatives) celebrating the year one progress of the Brussels Declaration on ADPKD, while calling for urgent backing from policy makers to reduce the widespread inequalities and variations in care that remain. [More]
World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on children

World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on children

On Thursday March 10th we are celebrating the 11th edition of World Kidney Day (WKD), a joint initiative organized by the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) and the International Federation of Kidney Foundations (IFKF). [More]
Pioneering progress on ADPKD: an interview with Tess Harris

Pioneering progress on ADPKD: an interview with Tess Harris

ADPKD is a chronic, progressive and inherited kidney disease characterized by fluid-filled cysts that develop in the kidneys and other organs. It is the most common inherited kidney disease, and affects millions worldwide. [More]
Renal risk factors for NA-treated HBV patients identified

Renal risk factors for NA-treated HBV patients identified

A South Korean research team has identified several clinical and medical factors associated with renal function decline in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection treated with oral nucleos(t)ide analogues. [More]
RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

RUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules approved for treatment-naïve CLL patients

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved IMBRUVICA (ibrutinib) capsules for treatment-naïve patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). [More]
Preterm neonatal progenitor cells may be a powerful tool for regeneration of damaged kidneys

Preterm neonatal progenitor cells may be a powerful tool for regeneration of damaged kidneys

Cells collected noninvasively from the urine of preterm infants may lead to breakthroughs in regenerative kidney repair for patients with kidney disease and injury, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. [More]
Changes in use of anemia drugs affects risk of death or cardiovascular events in dialysis patients

Changes in use of anemia drugs affects risk of death or cardiovascular events in dialysis patients

A new study examines whether recent changes in the use of anemia drugs for patients on dialysis have contributed to changes in rates of death or cardiovascular events. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, indicate that these risks appear to be decreasing for patients on dialysis as well as for older adults (Medicare beneficiaries) who are not on dialysis. [More]
Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 enzyme protects the heart from doxorubicin damage

Over-expression of heme oxygenase-1 enzyme protects the heart from doxorubicin damage

Life-threatening heart damage is an adverse side effect of the cancer drug doxorubicin, damage that also limits the use of newer chemotherapeutic agents such as trastuzumab and imatinib. The ability to protect the heart from these side effects would benefit patients, including cancer survivors who are at risk of developing heart damage years later, and it also could allow safer use of these drugs at higher doses. [More]
New study shows beneficial effects of fish consumption during pregnancy

New study shows beneficial effects of fish consumption during pregnancy

A new study supports the theory that the detrimental effects of low-level exposure to mercury may be outweighed by the beneficial effects of fish consumption. [More]
Masked hypertension linked with increased risks of kidney, heart and vascular damage

Masked hypertension linked with increased risks of kidney, heart and vascular damage

Many patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension that is not detected in the clinic, and such 'masked' hypertension is linked with increased risks of kidney, heart, and vascular damage. [More]
Maternal diabetes could be a risk factor for low milk supply

Maternal diabetes could be a risk factor for low milk supply

A new study shows that women with diabetes during pregnancy face a significantly higher risk of having a low milk supply. [More]
Vanderbilt nephrologist building implantable artificial kidney with microchip filters

Vanderbilt nephrologist building implantable artificial kidney with microchip filters

Vanderbilt University Medical Center nephrologist and associate professor of medicine Dr. William H. Fissell IV, is making major progress on a first-of-its kind device to free kidney patients from dialysis. He is building an implantable artificial kidney with microchip filters and living kidney cells that will be powered by a patient's own heart. [More]
Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Variations in Tie2 gene play significant role in patient responses to infections

Major infections such as influenza and bacterial sepsis kill millions of people each year, often resulting fro dangerous complications that impair the body's blood vessels. But the reasons why some patients experience these dramatic responses to infections -- and others don't -- have been unclear. [More]
Kumamoto University researchers identify protein that limits severity of Alport syndrome

Kumamoto University researchers identify protein that limits severity of Alport syndrome

Researchers from Kumamoto University, Japan have identified a protein that limits the severity of Alport syndrome, a type of genetic kidney disease. The finding can provide clues that point toward new therapeutic approaches for Alport syndrome. [More]

Study: Only one-third of patients receive living donor kidney transplant pre-emptively

A kidney transplant is a life-changing and life-saving procedure. Yet, a new study conducted by Mayo Clinic and the University of Michigan shows that only one-third of patients who ultimately receive a living donor kidney transplant receive it pre-emptively (i.e., before starting dialysis). Less than two-thirds receive a transplant either pre-emptively or within a year of starting dialysis. [More]
New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

New study finds steep decline in basic science publications

A new study has found a steep decline in the number of scholarly papers about basic science published in leading medical journals in the last 20 years. [More]
Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Electronic medical data could help verify link between maternal obesity and diabetes to autism

Scientists show they can use electronic medical records and birth information to verify and strengthen an already suspected link between autistic children and pregnant mothers with obesity and diabetes. [More]
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