Nephrology News and Research RSS Feed - Nephrology News and Research

Nephrology is a branch of internal medicine and pediatrics dealing with the study of the function and diseases of the kidney.
New method to generate kidney organoids from patient cells can help study human kidney diseases

New method to generate kidney organoids from patient cells can help study human kidney diseases

A new method to create kidney organoids from patient cells may provide insights into how kidney diseases arise and how they should be treated. [More]
Cigarette smoking may disrupt kidney-protective effects of medications in CKD patients

Cigarette smoking may disrupt kidney-protective effects of medications in CKD patients

To improve care for patients with kidney dysfunction, investigators are striving to identify modifiable risk factors that may slow the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to kidney failure. [More]
New program may help overcome barriers to identifying live kidney donors

New program may help overcome barriers to identifying live kidney donors

A new program may help overcome common barriers to finding living kidney donors. The program will be highlighted at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15¬-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, IL. [More]
Dietary sodium restriction may provide kidney and heart benefits for CKD patients

Dietary sodium restriction may provide kidney and heart benefits for CKD patients

New research indicates that reducing sodium intake may provide kidney and heart benefits for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). [More]
T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

T cell channel could be potential new target for treating head and neck cancers

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati have discovered that an ion channel, active within T cells (white blood cells), could be targeted to reduce the growth of head and neck cancers. [More]
Diagnosis and management of constipation may help protect kidney health

Diagnosis and management of constipation may help protect kidney health

Researchers have discovered a link between constipation and poor kidney health. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, suggest that the diagnosis and management of constipation might be helpful for preventing or treating kidney disease. [More]
Mount Sinai Health System introduces first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system

Mount Sinai Health System introduces first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system

Researchers in the Sinai App Lab at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have developed RxUniverse, the first enterprise-wide digital medicine care delivery system that enables physicians to digitally prescribe evidence-based mobile health applications to patients at the point of care. [More]
C-Path, CDISC and TransCelerate announce availability of TA Standard for Kidney Transplantation

C-Path, CDISC and TransCelerate announce availability of TA Standard for Kidney Transplantation

The Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium, Critical Path Institute, and TransCelerate BioPharma, Inc., announce the open availability of a CDISC Therapeutic Area (TA) Standard for Kidney Transplantation. [More]
New analysis shows women not at increased risk of AKI following cardiovascular surgery

New analysis shows women not at increased risk of AKI following cardiovascular surgery

Contrary to generally accepted beliefs, a new analysis indicates that women do not have a higher risk than men for developing kidney damage after cardiovascular surgery when adjustments are made for comorbidities. [More]
Cost-effective modified natural cycle IVF offers hope to young couples with fewer financial resources

Cost-effective modified natural cycle IVF offers hope to young couples with fewer financial resources

Researchers at University of Southern California (USC) Fertility at Keck Medicine of USC have determined that modified natural cycle in-vitro fertilization (IVF) is a more cost-effective fertility method than controlled ovarian stimulation and traditional IVF. [More]
USAID funds partnership effort to locate and assess Zika cold spots in Guatemala

USAID funds partnership effort to locate and assess Zika cold spots in Guatemala

The Arnhold Institute for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, software company Dimagi, and Guatemalan NGO TulaSalud announced today that their partnership to locate and assess vulnerable areas in Guatemala to determine their level of risk for a Zika epidemic is being funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. [More]
MSHS introduces online patient experience star ratings for its physicians

MSHS introduces online patient experience star ratings for its physicians

Mount Sinai Health System today began posting patient experience ratings for its doctors, becoming the largest academic health system in New York City to do so. [More]
Mount Sinai researchers use OCT angiography to identify early stages of glaucoma

Mount Sinai researchers use OCT angiography to identify early stages of glaucoma

In a first of its kind study, Mount Sinai researchers are using optimal coherence tomography (OCT) angiography to look at the earliest stages of glaucoma and identify characteristic patterns of different forms of glaucoma based on their vascular patterns. [More]
Factors secreted by intestinal bacteria may help prevent or treat kidney stones

Factors secreted by intestinal bacteria may help prevent or treat kidney stones

Researchers have discovered that factors secreted by gut bacteria might help prevent or treat kidney stones. [More]
Mount Sinai awarded $10 million grant to explore cellular, molecular mechanisms of GVHD

Mount Sinai awarded $10 million grant to explore cellular, molecular mechanisms of GVHD

Researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have been awarded a $10 million from the National Cancer Institute to explore the cellular and molecular mechanisms of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a common side effect that occurs after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and to develop novel therapeutic strategies for BMT patients with cancer that begin in the cells of blood-forming tissue or hematologic malignancies. [More]
New study questions longstanding belief related to hemodialysis patients treated with catheters

New study questions longstanding belief related to hemodialysis patients treated with catheters

The findings of a new study call into question the longstanding belief that the higher risk of premature death seen in hemodialysis patients who are treated with catheters is due to an elevated risk of complications. [More]
African ancestry linked to increased kidney disease risk among Hispanic/Latino adults

African ancestry linked to increased kidney disease risk among Hispanic/Latino adults

African ancestry contributes to the risk of chronic kidney disease among some Hispanic/Latino adults, according to a study co-authored by Loyola University Chicago researchers. [More]
Virtual Reality Initiative aims to provide emotional benefit to young cancer patients

Virtual Reality Initiative aims to provide emotional benefit to young cancer patients

The University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center has partnered with Springbok Cares to provide a unique Virtual Reality (VR) initiative for patients in the Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer program at USC. [More]
Phillips School of Nursing receives approval to offer second degree ABSN program

Phillips School of Nursing receives approval to offer second degree ABSN program

The Phillips School of Nursing at Mount Sinai Beth Israel announced today that it has received approval from the New York State Education Department to offer a second degree accelerated bachelor of science in nursing beginning in the spring of 2017. [More]
Imaging agent linked to risk of AKI may be less hazardous than previously thought

Imaging agent linked to risk of AKI may be less hazardous than previously thought

A new analysis indicates that radiocontrast, which is commonly used during selected imaging tests may be less hazardous than previously thought. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, suggest that imaging studies that might help save or improve lives are being unnecessarily withheld from patients owing to exaggerated fears. [More]
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