Neurodegeneration News and Research RSS Feed - Neurodegeneration News and Research

Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons.
Dental pulp stem cells can protect retinal ganglion cells from death following injury

Dental pulp stem cells can protect retinal ganglion cells from death following injury

Researchers at the University of Birmingham, UK, led by Dr. Ben Scheven, Dr. Wendy Leadbeater and Ben Mead have discovered that stem cells isolated from the teeth, termed dental pulp stem cells (DPSC), can protect retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) from death following injury and promote regeneration of their axons along the optic nerve. [More]
MEF2 gene: A potential therapeutic target to protect neuronal loss in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

MEF2 gene: A potential therapeutic target to protect neuronal loss in Alzheimer's, Parkinson's

A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) has identified a chemical "switch" that controls both the generation of new neurons from neural stem cells and the survival of existing nerve cells in the brain. [More]
Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

Loss of p62 protein in cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can influence tumor growth

A team of scientists from Sanford Burnham Medical Research Institute has found that the loss of a protein called p62 in the cells and tissue surrounding a tumor can enhance the growth and progression of tumors. [More]
Low accuracy of clinical diagnosis for early Parkinson’s disease

Low accuracy of clinical diagnosis for early Parkinson’s disease

About three-quarters of patients suspected to have early Parkinson’s disease eventually prove to have other conditions, a study shows. [More]
NEI researchers describe functions of gene responsible for anchoring cilia

NEI researchers describe functions of gene responsible for anchoring cilia

Researchers at the National Eye Institute (NEI) have described the functions of a gene responsible for anchoring cilia - sensory hair-like extensions present on almost every cell of the body. [More]
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in veterans: an interview with Milan Michael Karol, The Robert Packard Center for ALS Research at Johns Hopkins

ALS stands for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, better known as “Lou Gehrig’s Disease”. It is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. [More]
Researchers identify two oncogenes that drive the development of medulloblastoma

Researchers identify two oncogenes that drive the development of medulloblastoma

A new collaborative study carried out by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, UC San Diego, the German Cancer Research Center, the University of Heidelberg (Germany), and 33 other research institutions has identified two oncogenes, called GFI1 and GFI1B, that drive the development of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in children. [More]
Researchers explore role of stem cells in treating neuroinjury and neurodegenerative disorders

Researchers explore role of stem cells in treating neuroinjury and neurodegenerative disorders

Researchers at the University of Florida, USA, led by Dr. K. Wang have demonstrated that inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and subsequent cofilin dephosphorylation is mediating neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. [More]
U-M researchers detail new discoveries about basic biology of dystonia

U-M researchers detail new discoveries about basic biology of dystonia

Twist and hold your neck to the left. Now down, and over to the right, until it hurts. Now imagine your neck - or arms or legs - randomly doing that on their own, without you controlling it. [More]
REM sleep disorder: A sign of impending neurodegenerative disease

REM sleep disorder: A sign of impending neurodegenerative disease

How many millions of people suffer from sleep disturbance? One sleep disorder in particular, called REM behavior disorder, could be a sign of impending neurodegenerative disease, including Parkinson's and dementia, say scientists presenting their research at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting. [More]
Study: The brain controls cellular process that leads to glaucoma

Study: The brain controls cellular process that leads to glaucoma

Findings from a new study published in Translational Vision Science & Technology show the brain, not the eye, controls the cellular process that leads to glaucoma. The results may help develop treatments for one of the world's leading causes of irreversible blindness, as well as contribute to the development of future therapies for preserving brain function in other age-related disorders like Alzheimer's. [More]
New gene involved in Parkinson's disease, find researchers

New gene involved in Parkinson's disease, find researchers

A team of UCLA researchers has identified a new gene involved in Parkinson's disease, a finding that may one day provide a target for a new drug to prevent and potentially even cure the debilitating neurological disorder. [More]
Researchers reveal potential new drug target for dementia

Researchers reveal potential new drug target for dementia

Researchers at King's College London have discovered how a molecular 'scaffold' which allows key parts of cells to interact, comes apart in dementia and motor neuron disease, revealing a potential new target for drug discovery. [More]
New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

New research shows how misfolded proteins are precisely selected for degradation

It's almost axiomatic that misfolded proteins compromise how cells normally function and cause debilitating human disease, but how these proteins are detected and degraded within the body is not well understood. [More]
Sanford-Burnham, Daiichi enter into comprehensive alliance to develop first-in-class therapeutics

Sanford-Burnham, Daiichi enter into comprehensive alliance to develop first-in-class therapeutics

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham) and Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd. (Daiichi Sankyo) today announced they have entered into a three-year comprehensive alliance to develop first-in-class therapeutics for the treatment of cardiovascular-metabolic diseases. [More]
New dual-pronged approach for treating Niemann-Pick type C disease

New dual-pronged approach for treating Niemann-Pick type C disease

By studying nerve and liver cells grown from patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), Whitehead Institute researchers have identified a potential dual-pronged approach to treating Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease, a rare but devastating genetic disorder. [More]
Retrophin reports net loss of $70.6 million for first quarter 2014

Retrophin reports net loss of $70.6 million for first quarter 2014

Retrophin, Inc. today reported its financial results for the quarter ended March 31, 2014. [More]
Novel molecule prevents symptoms linked with allergen-induced asthma

Novel molecule prevents symptoms linked with allergen-induced asthma

A new study carried out by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces (Germany), the Free University of Berlin (Germany), UC San Diego, and Shinshu University (Japan) has identified a novel molecule that prevents T-cells from orchestrating asthma brought on by allergens. [More]
People with longevity gene have improved brain skills

People with longevity gene have improved brain skills

Scientists showed that people who have a variant of a longevity gene, called KLOTHO, have improved brain skills such as thinking, learning and memory regardless of their age, sex, or whether they have a genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
EXCEMED meeting draws experts to explore roles of genetics, environment in MS pathology

EXCEMED meeting draws experts to explore roles of genetics, environment in MS pathology

The diagnosis and treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) have dramatically improved over recent decades due to scientific advancements, yet MS persists as one of the most disabling neurological disorders, having a significant impact on young adults - the age group most affected by the disease. [More]