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Neurodegeneration is the umbrella term for the progressive loss of structure or function of neurons, including death of neurons.
Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Drug discovery experts receive £3m to find new treatments for Alzheimer's disease

Funding worth nearly half a million pounds will unite academics at the University of Southampton with drug discovery experts at the medical research charity MRC Technology, to target the immune system in the hunt for new treatments for Alzheimer's disease. [More]
α-synuclein conformation may underlie neurodegenerative variability

α-synuclein conformation may underlie neurodegenerative variability

Varying structural conformations of α-synuclein may explain how one protein can give rise to distinct forms of neurodegeneration, say researchers. [More]
Research progress with promising Alzheimer's drug Xanamem

Research progress with promising Alzheimer's drug Xanamem

Actinogen Limited (Actinogen Medical, ASX: ACW), an Australian biotechnology company focused on the development of novel treatments for Alzheimer’s disease and other major age-related neurodegenerative disorders, is pleased to announce that it has received ethics approval to initiate the third and final stage of the second Phase I trial of its lead Alzheimer’s drug candidate, Xanamem™. [More]
Immune system linked to death of motor neurons in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Immune system linked to death of motor neurons in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

A previously unknown link between the immune system and the death of motor neurons in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, has been discovered by scientists at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The finding paves the way to a whole new approach for finding a drug that can cure or at least slow the progression of such neurodegenerative diseases as ALS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. [More]
Frankfurt researchers decode molecular details that provide better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Frankfurt researchers decode molecular details that provide better understanding of neurodegenerative diseases

Quality control is important - this is not only applicable to industrial production but also true for all life processes. However, whereas an enterprise can start a large-scale recall in case of any doubt, defects in the quality control systems of cells are often fatal. [More]
PQBP1 protein could improve body's immune response to HIV vaccines

PQBP1 protein could improve body's immune response to HIV vaccines

In a scientific discovery that has significant implications for preventing HIV infections, researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have identified a protein that could improve the body's immune response to HIV vaccines and prevent transmission of the virus. [More]
Sanford-Burnham, Takeda partner to develop new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disease

Sanford-Burnham, Takeda partner to develop new therapeutic targets for cardiovascular disease

Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute at Lake Nona today announced it has signed a two-year partnership agreement with Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Ltd. of Japan to study the potential role of several gene regulatory proteins as targets for the treatment of heart failure. [More]
Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

Researchers suggest new target for treating BRAF inhibitor-resistant melanoma tumors

A new collaborative study led by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute, published today in Cell Reports, provides new insight into the molecular changes that lead to resistance to a commonly prescribed group of drugs called BRAF inhibitors. [More]
Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

Diabetes and poor diet can trigger Alzheimer's or Parkinson's, warns BUAP researcher

For several years a researcher was dedicated to feed rodents in his laboratory with a high caloric content and glucose concentrations, which caused them diabetes, and by scientifically assessing what occurred in animals he observed that "diabetes and poor diet is a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's or Parkinson's," warns Samuel Treviño Mora from the Meritorious University of Puebla in Mexico. [More]
New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

New in vitro system could become important tool in search for potential drugs against Alzheimer’s

A typical characteristic of the brain of an Alzheimer sufferer is the presence of insoluble Tau protein aggregates. Scientists at VIB, KU Leuven and Janssen Pharmaceutica have demonstrated that the distribution of these aggregates through the brain is facilitated by synaptic connections between brain cells. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists uncover role of HTRA3 protease in Cockayne syndrome

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and CNRS, in collaboration with scientists from the Institut Gustave Roussy and CEA, have succeeded in restoring normal activity in cells isolated from patients with the premature aging disease Cockayne syndrome. They have uncovered the role played in these cells by an enzyme, the HTRA3 protease. [More]
Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and sports

Available research does not support the contention that athletes are uniquely at risk of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) or other neurodegenerative disorders, according to a review in the June issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]
Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition that strikes at the heart of what makes us human: the ability to think, to feel, to remember and to communicate with those around us. The tragedy is compounded by the fact that there is currently no cure, no treatment, and no diagnostic method capable of identifying Alzheimer's at its early stages. [More]
Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

Green tea compound, voluntary exercise slow Alzheimer's disease progression in mice

According to the National Institutes of Health, Alzheimer's disease (AD) may affect as many as 5.5 million Americans. Scientists currently are seeking treatments and therapies found in common foods that will help stave off the disease or prevent it completely. [More]
Dr. Mike O. Karl awarded EYEnovative Research Award for retina research

Dr. Mike O. Karl awarded EYEnovative Research Award for retina research

Dr. Mike O. Karl, group leader at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the DFG Research Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden - Cluster of Excellence at the TU Dresden, was awarded the “EYEnovative Förderpreis” of the Novartis Pharma GmbH already for the second time. [More]

CorTechs Labs, Novartis partner to advance clinical care, assessment of multiple sclerosis worldwide

CorTechs Labs, the leading medical software innovator providing solutions for quantitative brain volume analysis is pleased to announce a partnership agreement with Novartis Pharma AG, a global pharmaceutical company. [More]
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