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UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

UC San Diego Health System designated as Center of Excellence for Huntington's disease

The Huntington's Disease Clinical Research Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated a Center of Excellence by the Huntington's Disease Society of America. UC San Diego was one of only 29 centers nationwide to receive this prestigious designation, which recognizes centers for their elite multidisciplinary approach to Huntington's disease care and research. [More]
New article shows link between head injuries and neurodegenerative disease in rugby union players

New article shows link between head injuries and neurodegenerative disease in rugby union players

A new article publishing online today in the Quarterly Journal of Medicine has reported the first case showing an association between exposure to head injuries in rugby union players and an increased risk in neurodegenerative disease. [More]
Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Study finds similarity in clinical progression between human patients and Huntington's disease monkeys

Transgenic Huntington's disease monkeys show similarity to humans with Huntington's in their progressive neurodegeneration and decline of motor control, scientists from Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, report. [More]
Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali Therapeutics Inc., a new biotechnology company focused on developing effective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced today that it has launched with an initial investment commitment of $217 million. [More]
Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries may accelerate aging process, increase dementia risk

Repetitive head injuries that occur during contact sports and military service may accelerate the aging process by increasing the build-up of beta-amyloid in the brain, leading to worse disease and an increased likelihood of developing dementia. In particular, boxers fared the worst among athletes and military veterans with a history of head injuries. [More]
Gene expression is key to understanding differences between individuals and predisposition to disease

Gene expression is key to understanding differences between individuals and predisposition to disease

The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project consortia, which includes scientists from the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona, have now published their results from their first pilot study in three Science papers... [More]
Knowing the physical structure of amyloid beta-42 offers new view on amyloid propagation in Alzheimer's

Knowing the physical structure of amyloid beta-42 offers new view on amyloid propagation in Alzheimer's

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have determined the molecular structure of one of the proteins in the fine fibers of the brain plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. This molecule, called amyloid beta-42, is toxic to nerve cells and is believed to provoke the disease cascade. [More]
GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project have created a new and much-anticipated data resource to help establish how differences in an individual's genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. [More]
Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition that strikes at the heart of what makes us human: the ability to think, to feel, to remember and to communicate with those around us. The tragedy is compounded by the fact that there is currently no cure, no treatment, and no diagnostic method capable of identifying Alzheimer's at its early stages. [More]
Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

Scientists report that enzyme that alters testosterone to estrogen has big impact in healthy, injured brain

An enzyme that converts testosterone to estrogen appears to have significant impact in a healthy and injured brain, scientists report. [More]
High-skill jobs may increase survival for people with frontotemporal dementia

High-skill jobs may increase survival for people with frontotemporal dementia

Doctors, lawyers and other "high level" professionals may have a built-in survival edge if they're diagnosed with the disease frontotemporal dementia (FTD), according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]

Individuals with mild Traumatic Brain Injury show brain abnormalities in their white matter

Individuals with mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI), particularly those who have had loss of consciousness (LOC), show structural brain abnormalities in their white matter as measured by Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). [More]
Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Aging associated with development of dysphagia

Nearly 40 percent of Americans 60 and older are living with a swallowing disorder known as dysphagia. Although it is a major health problem associated with aging, it is unknown whether the condition is a natural part of healthy aging or if it is caused by an age-related disease that has yet to be diagnosed, such as Parkinson's disease or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Compact MRI and multimodality: an interview with Bernard Siow, UCL

Compact MRI and multimodality: an interview with Bernard Siow, UCL

CABI is a preclinical imaging laboratory where we have about ten modalities. We started off with MRI and we have a 9.4T high-field system. [More]
Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Study finds link between neurodegenerative disorders and inflammation

Researchers from McMaster University and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York have discovered that a protein associated with neurodegenerative diseases like ALS also plays an important role in the body's natural antiviral response. [More]
Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Researchers present new studies on cognition and reasoning at CNS conference in San Francisco

Even rats can imagine: A new study finds that rats have the ability to link cause and effect such that they can expect, or imagine, something happening even if it isn't. [More]
Immunotherapy reverses memory problems in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

Immunotherapy reverses memory problems in animal model of Alzheimer's disease

A new study from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has revealed that a single dose of an immunotherapy reverses memory problems in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. The article appears in the March 25 issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Newly identified proteins could shed light on the mechanisms of ALS

Where ALS comes from and how it progresses are mysteries that continue to vex medical science. But recent research at Sweden's KTH Royal Institute of Technology has found three proteins that could shed some light on the mechanisms behind this deadly disease. [More]
Keystone meeting focuses on neuroinflammation, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

Keystone meeting focuses on neuroinflammation, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases

As Alzheimer's disease sweeps through the brain, do the brain's immune cells sit idly by and let it happen? Or could they overreact and make the disease worse? [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
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