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Study demonstrates therapeutic potential of SOD-mimetic compound M40403 against Parkinson disease

Study demonstrates therapeutic potential of SOD-mimetic compound M40403 against Parkinson disease

Parkinson disease is a debilitating and incurable neurodegenerative disorder, affecting approximately 1-2% of people over sixty-five years old. Oxidative damage is considered to play a central role in the progression of Parkinson disease and strong evidence links chronic exposure to the pesticide paraquat with the incidence of the disease, most probably through the generation of oxidative damage. [More]
Penn neurologists uncover new genetic cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

Penn neurologists uncover new genetic cause of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease (CMT) is a family of inherited disorders of the peripheral nervous system, affecting approximately one in 2,500 Americans. Its most common iteration, CMT1, comes in many forms, most of which have to date been linked to a small set of causative genes. [More]
Study identifies biomarker that plays role in early stages of Alzheimer's disease

Study identifies biomarker that plays role in early stages of Alzheimer's disease

A multicenter study led by Christian Haass and Michael Ewers of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich has identified a biomarker associated with the activation of an innate immune response to neural damage during early stages of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Immune cells may play greater role in Alzheimer's disease than originally thought

Immune cells may play greater role in Alzheimer's disease than originally thought

Immune cells that normally help us fight off bacterial and viral infections may play a far greater role in Alzheimer's disease than originally thought, according to University of California, Irvine neurobiologists with the Sue & Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center and the Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders. [More]
Study finding could shed light on molecular mechanisms underlying Huntington's disease

Study finding could shed light on molecular mechanisms underlying Huntington's disease

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have shown that the core of the protein clumps found in the brains of people with Huntington's disease have a distinctive structure, a finding that could shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the neurodegenerative disorder. [More]
Researchers reveal secondary structure of Lewy bodies in the brain of Parkinson's disease patients

Researchers reveal secondary structure of Lewy bodies in the brain of Parkinson's disease patients

Lewy bodies had been considered to be a key element of pathogenesis for Parkinson's disease. Although structural analysis for Lewy bodies with an electron microscope had been performed, it had no secondary structural information of proteins, which is important for the development of drugs. [More]
Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

Concussion expert shares important information on sports-related concussions

The Sports Concussion Program in the Children's Orthopaedic Center at Children's Hospital Los Angeles is the only pediatric program of its kind in Southern California. [More]
Novel drug candidate prevents nerve cell damage in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Novel drug candidate prevents nerve cell damage in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) and Longevity Biotech, Inc., has demonstrated that neuroprotection could be attained in preclinical models by a novel drug candidate that changes immune responses. [More]
Biogen begins ISIS-SOD1 Rx Phase 1/2 clinical study in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Biogen begins ISIS-SOD1 Rx Phase 1/2 clinical study in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced that its partner, Biogen, has initiated a Phase 1/2 clinical study of ISIS-SOD1 Rx (BIIB067) in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Tetra begins human Phase 1 safety trials of BPN14770

Tetra begins human Phase 1 safety trials of BPN14770

Tetra Discovery Partners today announced that the company has initiated human Phase 1 safety trials of its lead compound BPN14770, which Tetra is developing as a potential treatment to both improve memory and slow the progression of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
BRCA1 depletion can potentially contribute to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease

BRCA1 depletion can potentially contribute to cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers from the Gladstone Institutes have shown for the first time that the protein BRCA1 is required for normal learning and memory and is depleted by Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Slower aging reduces degeneration related to Parkinson's disease

Slower aging reduces degeneration related to Parkinson's disease

Humans have long sought to reduce the effects of aging. Now, there may be another reason to continue searching for ways to slow the clock--preventing Parkinson's disease. [More]
UB study sheds light on the root causes of Huntington's disease

UB study sheds light on the root causes of Huntington's disease

We've known for years that the Huntingtin protein (Htt) is responsible for Huntington's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that diminishes a person's mental and physical abilities. [More]
SynAgile announces positive results from Phase 2a trial of continuous intraoral LD/CD therapy

SynAgile announces positive results from Phase 2a trial of continuous intraoral LD/CD therapy

SynAgile Corporation, a privately held pharmaceutical company that develops and commercializes drug delivery systems using its proprietary OraFuse intraoral technology platform, today announced positive results from a proof-of-concept, Phase 2a, open-label clinical trial of continuous intraoral administration of levodopa-carbidopa (LD/CD). [More]
Study suggests link between human endogenous retroviral genes and ALS

Study suggests link between human endogenous retroviral genes and ALS

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health discovered that reactivation of ancient viral genes embedded in the human genome may cause the destruction of neurons in some forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). [More]
Study shows link between impaired mitochondria, energy failure, and neuronal dysfunction

Study shows link between impaired mitochondria, energy failure, and neuronal dysfunction

A new study from the Gladstone Institutes shows for the first time that impairments in mitochondria--the brain's cellular power plants--can deplete cellular energy levels and cause neuronal dysfunction in a model of neurodegenerative disease. [More]
Study reveals why long-term use of L-DOPA leads to dyskinesia

Study reveals why long-term use of L-DOPA leads to dyskinesia

Researchers have discovered why long-term use of L-DOPA (levodopa), the most effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, commonly leads to a movement problem called dyskinesia, a side effect that can be as debilitating as Parkinson's disease itself. [More]
University of Basel scientists identify genes that play central role in development of Alzheimer's disease

University of Basel scientists identify genes that play central role in development of Alzheimer's disease

Genes are not only important for regular memory performance, but also for the development of Alzheimer's disease. Researchers at the University of Basel now identified a specific group of genes that plays a central role in both processes. This group of molecules controls the concentration of calcium ions inside the cell. [More]
Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Newly discovered prion causes Multiple System Atrophy

Multiple System Atrophy (MSA), a neurodegenerative disorder with similarities to Parkinson's disease, is caused by a newly discovered type of prion, akin to the misfolded proteins involved in incurable progressive brain diseases such Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), according to two new research papers led by scientists at UC San Francisco. [More]
Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

Brain cells in Parkinson's disease die prematurely, burning out like an overheating motor

The death of brain cells in Parkinson's disease may be caused by a form of cellular energy crisis in neurons that require unusually high quantities of energy to carry out their job of regulating movement, researchers at the University of Montreal reported today. [More]
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