Neurological Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Neurological Disease News and Research

​Scripps florida scientists find a defect responsible for memory impairment in aging

​Scripps florida scientists find a defect responsible for memory impairment in aging

Everyone worries about losing their memory as they grow older—memory loss remains one of the most common complaints of the elderly. But the molecular reasons behind the processes remain unclear, particularly those associated with advancing age. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. [More]
Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the "modest" benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

CAMH scientists discover potential new approach to treat multiple sclerosis

Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health have discovered a promising new approach to treat multiple sclerosis (MS). In a new study, they've identified a previously unknown change in the spinal cord related to MS, and a way to alter this change to reduce the nerve cell damage that occurs with the disease. [More]

Research: Complex nerve circuits first evolved in common ancestor of humans and cnidarians

New research shows that a burst of evolutionary innovation in the genes responsible for electrical communication among nerve cells in our brains occurred over 600 million years ago in a common ancestor of humans and the sea anemone. [More]
Novartis receives priority review status from FDA for heart failure medicine LCZ696

Novartis receives priority review status from FDA for heart failure medicine LCZ696

Novartis announced today that the US Food and Drug Administration has granted priority review for LCZ696, an investigational medicine for the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). The designation is intended to accelerate the review of therapies that offer a significant improvement in the safety or effectiveness of the treatment, prevention or diagnosis of a serious condition. [More]
'Mad Cow' discovery points to possible neuron killing mechanism behind alzheimer’s and parkinson’s diseases

'Mad Cow' discovery points to possible neuron killing mechanism behind alzheimer’s and parkinson’s diseases

The new study, published recently in the journal Brain, revealed the mechanism of toxicity of a misfolded form of the protein that underlies prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy (“mad cow disease”) and its human equivalent, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. [More]
Epigem contribute to PhD research into Multiple Sclerosis

Epigem contribute to PhD research into Multiple Sclerosis

Epigem, a high-tech British micro engineering company, is supporting research into Multiple Sclerosis (MS) with a new PhD programme to create a novel drug screening platform. This will accelerate the production of MS models and pre-clinical drug development, in order to understand better the disease process and its periods of remission. [More]
Isis receives $5 million from Biogen Idec to develop drugs for neurological disorders

Isis receives $5 million from Biogen Idec to develop drugs for neurological disorders

Isis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today it has earned a $5 million milestone payment from Biogen Idec associated with the validation of an undisclosed target to treat a neurological disorder under its broad strategic collaboration with Biogen Idec to develop drugs to treat patients with neurological disorders. [More]
Three groups of researchers receive BRAIN Initiative funding to improve artificial limb technology

Three groups of researchers receive BRAIN Initiative funding to improve artificial limb technology

Three groups of researchers who have received support from the National Institutes of Health will obtain funding from the President's BRAIN Initiative to improve artificial limb technology. The new awards will be funded and administered by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and will build on the fundamental discoveries that were made possible by NIH support. [More]
Study provides further evidence of cerebellum's role in higher cognitive functions

Study provides further evidence of cerebellum's role in higher cognitive functions

Grasping an object involves a complex network of brain functions. First, visual cues are processed in specialized areas of the brain. Then, other areas of the brain use these signals to control the hands to reach for and manipulate the desired object. [More]
Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Recognized for their pioneering work in the development of gene transfer technology using retroviral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes into cells, Richard C. Mulligan, PhD, Director of the Harvard Gene Therapy Initiative, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA, and A. Dusty Miller, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, received the Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Exploring better treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Exploring better treatment for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) affects 2-3% of children aged between 10 and 16. It is more common in girls than in boys (with a ratio of 10-1). Besides the obvious physical signs derived from the visible spinal deformity, AIS can cause psychological and emotional problems (low self-esteem, poor self-image body, etc.) that significantly reduces patients' quality of life. [More]
Rare respiratory virus could be linked to severe neurological illness in children

Rare respiratory virus could be linked to severe neurological illness in children

A cluster of children from Colorado in the USA have been treated for muscle weakness or paralysis that may be connected to a nationwide outbreak of a usually rare respiratory virus called enterovirus D68 (EV-D68), one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses. [More]
Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

Reducing A2A adenosine receptor levels prevents memory impairments in Alzheimer's mouse model

A study by scientists from the Gladstone Institutes shows that decreasing the number of A2A adenosine receptors in a particular type of brain cells called astrocytes improved memory in healthy mice. What's more, reducing receptor levels also prevented memory impairments in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Researchers test pocket stimulator on patients with Parkinson's disease

Researchers test pocket stimulator on patients with Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease is a slowly degenerative neurological disease that is expressed as impaired motor control, tremors, stiffness and, in later stages, problems with balance. [More]
AMRI awarded NIH contract for drug development services

AMRI awarded NIH contract for drug development services

AMRI today announced it received a 10-year federal contract award from the National Institutes of Health for drug development and manufacturing services. This NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke award will support NIH's Drug Manufacturing and Formulation Program (DMFP), which is a component of the Blueprint Neurotherapeutics Network (BPN). [More]
Could déjà vu be linked to anxiety?

Could déjà vu be linked to anxiety?

A psychology expert from Sheffield Hallam University has reported what could be the first case of a person experiencing persistent déjà vu stemming from anxiety. [More]