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Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Study shows how people's expectation of pain affects the experience of pain

Picture yourself in a medical office, anxiously awaiting your annual flu shot. The nurse casually states, "This won't hurt a bit." But when the needle pierces your skin it hurts, and it hurts a lot. Your expectations have been violated, and not in a good way. [More]
Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Mayo Clinic scientists create mouse model of ALS, FTD caused by mutations in C9ORF72 gene

Scientists at Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida created a novel mouse that exhibits the symptoms and neurodegeneration associated with the most common genetic forms of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, Lou Gehrig's disease), both of which are caused by a mutation in the a gene called C9ORF72. [More]
Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

Researchers find that blocking MCAM molecule could slow progression of multiple sclerosis

A drug that could halt the progression of multiple sclerosis may soon be developed thanks to a discovery by a team at the CHUM Research Centre and the University of Montreal. The researchers have identified a molecule called MCAM, and they have shown that blocking this molecule could delay the onset of the disease and significantly slow its progression. [More]
MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

MRI screening helps in accurate and rapid stroke treatment

Time is critical when it comes to stroke, and early treatment is associated with better outcomes. According to the Screening with MRI for Accurate and Rapid stroke Treatment (SMART) study, small changes in quality improvement procedures enabled clinicians to use MRI scans to diagnose stroke patients before giving acute treatment, within 60 minutes of hospital arrival. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Scientists uncover mechanism behind 'tubulin code'

Driving down the highway, you encounter ever-changing signs -- speed limits, exits, food and gas options. Seeing these roadside markers may cause you to slow down, change lanes or start thinking about lunch. In a similar way, cellular structures called microtubules are tagged with a variety of chemical markers that can influence cell functions. [More]

Wearable cognitive assessment devices a step closer as Cambridge Cognition file new patents

The combination of bio-behavioural measures and results from touch-screen cognitive tests would be used to build up a picture of a person’s mental function... [More]
Findings provide glimmer of hope for treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

Findings provide glimmer of hope for treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

Using brain tumor samples collected from children in the United States and Europe, an international team of scientists found that the drug panobinostat and similar gene regulating drugs may be effective at treating diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG), an aggressive and lethal form of pediatric cancer. [More]
NPC recognized as top ranking company on DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list

NPC recognized as top ranking company on DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity list

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation has been named the top company for diversity for the second year in a row on the annual DiversityInc Top 50 Companies for Diversity listing. DiversityInc announced the results of its 2015 Top 50 Companies for Diversity on April 23 at an awards ceremony in New York, NY. [More]
Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two existing drugs may potentially become new drug target for multiple sclerosis

Two drugs already on the market -- an antifungal and a steroid -- may potentially take on new roles as treatments for multiple sclerosis. According to a study published in Nature today, researchers discovered that these drugs may activate stem cells in the brain to stimulate myelin producing cells and repair white matter, which is damaged in multiple sclerosis. [More]
Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Plymouth researchers receive grant to develop effective therapy for Huntington's disease

Huntington's disease is an hereditary disorder of the nervous system caused by a faulty gene on chromosome four. The faulty gene leads to nerve damage in the area of the brain resulting in gradual physical, mental and emotional changes. Those born to a parent with Huntington's disease have a 50:50 chance of developing it, and there is currently no cure. [More]
Patient's own skin cells may hold key to new treatments for neurological diseases

Patient's own skin cells may hold key to new treatments for neurological diseases

A patient's very own skin cells may hold the key to new treatments and even cures for devastating neurological diseases. A generous $1 million donation from Mr. J. Sebastian van Berkom, and critical partnerships with Brain Canada, Laval University, Marigold Foundation and the FRQS-Réseau Parkinson Quebec are driving an innovative, iPSC (induced pluripotent stem cell) research platform that will transform research into Parkinson's and other neurological diseases. [More]
Cosentyx (secukinumab) safe, effective for treating psoriasis patients

Cosentyx (secukinumab) safe, effective for treating psoriasis patients

Novartis today announced new two-year results demonstrating sustained efficacy with Cosentyx (secukinumab) with an acceptable safety profile for the treatment of psoriasis patients. The data comes from the extension study of the pivotal Phase III FIXTURE and ERASURE trials. [More]
Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

Researchers find way to enhance effects of immunotherapy in glioblastoma

When cancer strikes, it may be possible for patients to fight back with their own defenses, using a strategy known as immunotherapy. According to a new study published in Nature, researchers have found a way to enhance the effects of this therapeutic approach in glioblastoma, a deadly type of brain cancer, and possibly improve patient outcomes. [More]
New study shows how presenilin gene mutations may lead to familial Alzheimer's disease

New study shows how presenilin gene mutations may lead to familial Alzheimer's disease

Mutations in the presenilin-1 gene are the most common cause of inherited, early-onset forms of Alzheimer's disease. In a new study, published in Neuron, scientists replaced the normal mouse presenilin-1 gene with Alzheimer's-causing forms of the human gene to discover how these genetic changes may lead to the disorder. [More]
University of Cambridge's Alastair Compston wins 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research

University of Cambridge's Alastair Compston wins 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research

The American Academy of Neurology and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society are awarding the 2015 John Dystel Prize for MS Research to Alastair Compston, MBBS, PhD, Professor of Neurology at the University of Cambridge. [More]
​Scripps florida scientists find a defect responsible for memory impairment in aging

​Scripps florida scientists find a defect responsible for memory impairment in aging

Everyone worries about losing their memory as they grow older—memory loss remains one of the most common complaints of the elderly. But the molecular reasons behind the processes remain unclear, particularly those associated with advancing age. [More]
Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Brain scientists map changes in communication between nerve cells in rats

Lights, sound, action: we are constantly learning how to incorporate outside sensations into our reactions in specific situations. In a new study, brain scientists have mapped changes in communication between nerve cells as rats learned to make specific decisions in response to particular sounds. The team then used this map to accurately predict the rats' reactions. These results add to our understanding of how the brain processes sensations and forms memories to inform behavior. [More]
TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. [More]
Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Henry Ford researchers propose new treatment strategy for stroke, other neurological disorders

Medicine should reconsider how it treats stroke and other neurological disorders, focusing on the intrinsic abilities of the brain and nervous system to heal themselves rather than the "modest" benefits of clot-busting drugs and other neuroprotective treatments. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
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