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Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Scientists reveal how a common gene mutation in ALS and FTD disrupts normal cell function

Researchers have determined how the most common gene mutation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) disrupts normal cell function, providing insight likely to advance efforts to develop targeted therapies for these brain diseases. [More]
Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Nuclear process in the brain may play critical role in health and disease

Every brain cell has a nucleus, or a central command station. Scientists have shown that the passage of molecules through the nucleus of a star-shaped brain cell, called an astrocyte, may play a critical role in health and disease. [More]
Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

Study suggests potential target for treating familial form of ALS

A healthy motor neuron needs to transport its damaged components from the nerve-muscle connection all the way back to the cell body in the spinal cord. If it cannot, the defective components pile up and the cell becomes sick and dies. Researchers at the NIH's National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke have learned how a mutation in the gene for superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), which causes ALS, leads cells to accumulate damaged materials. [More]
Modern living could lead to 'hidden' epidemic of neurological brain disease

Modern living could lead to 'hidden' epidemic of neurological brain disease

Modern living could be responsible for an 'almost epidemic' increase in neurological brain disease, according to new research from Bournemouth University. [More]
New study reveals how infectious proteins spread from gut to the brain

New study reveals how infectious proteins spread from gut to the brain

Diagnosis of deadly brain conditions could be helped by new research that shows how infectious proteins that cause the disease spread. [More]
Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

Brain-controlled prosthesis could improve quality of life in people with spinal cord injuries

When we type or perform other precise tasks, our brains and muscles usually work together effortlessly. But when a neurological disease or spinal cord injury severs the connection between the brain and limbs, once-easy motions become difficult or impossible. [More]
Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Atomic level images reveal how neuropeptide hormone neurotensin may activate its receptors

Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell's exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. [More]
New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

New non-invasive spinal cord stimulation helps paralyzed men voluntarily move their legs

Five men with complete motor paralysis were able to voluntarily generate step-like movements thanks to a new strategy that non-invasively delivers electrical stimulation to their spinal cords, according to a new study funded in part by the National Institutes of Health. The strategy, called transcutaneous stimulation, delivers electrical current to the spinal cord by way of electrodes strategically placed on the skin of the lower back. [More]
Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis announces FDA approval of Odomzo (sonidegib) 200 mg capsules for treatment of laBCC patients

Novartis today announced the US Food and Drug Administration has approved Odomzo (sonidegib, formerly LDE225) 200 mg capsules for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced basal cell carcinoma (laBCC) that has recurred following surgery or radiation therapy, or those who are not candidates for surgery or radiation therapy. [More]
Gladstone Institutes announces new business endeavor with Evotec and Dolby Family Ventures

Gladstone Institutes announces new business endeavor with Evotec and Dolby Family Ventures

The Gladstone Institutes announces the creation of Cure Network Ventures Inc. and Cure Network Dolby Acceleration Partners, LLC, a business endeavor with Dolby Family Ventures and Evotec AG, which will focus on Alzheimer's disease. Working through Cure Network Ventures, Inc., the new company will help expedite the translation of relevant scientific discoveries from the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease into the development of potential therapies. [More]
Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

Alzheimer's Association recognizes Li Gan with Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research

The Alzheimer's Association is recognizing Li Gan, Ph.D., for publishing influential research on the biology of Alzheimer's disease with the Inge Grundke-Iqbal Award for Alzheimer's Research. The Award was presented today during a plenary session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington, D.C. [More]
New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center's Center for Cognitive Neurology have evidence that monoclonal antibodies they developed may provide the blueprint for effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. [More]
C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12) gets orphan drug designation from FDA for PSP treatment

C2N Diagnostics and AbbVie today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has granted their investigational recombinant humanized anti-tau antibody, C2N-8E12 (ABBV-8E12), an orphan drug designation for the treatment of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). [More]
Rowan University, Bamboo Therapeutics partner to combat Canavan disease

Rowan University, Bamboo Therapeutics partner to combat Canavan disease

Rowan University and Bamboo Therapeutics, Inc. have entered into an asset transfer agreement to commercialize a novel gene therapy for the treatment of Canavan disease. A rare but devastating neurological disease that tragically takes a child's life by age 10, Canavan disease is one of the most common and complex degenerative cerebral diseases in infants. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

AMSBIO announces that Belgian researchers have cited use of BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent to introduce Tau seeds into HEK293 cells. BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent is a unique lipid formulation that allows direct translocation of proteins into living cells. [More]
University of Bristol-led study could provide new target for treating neurological disorders

University of Bristol-led study could provide new target for treating neurological disorders

Findings, published today [15 Jul] in Nature Communications, reveal the extent a mutation associated with autism and epilepsy plays in impairing a biochemical process in the brain. The study, led by University of Bristol researchers, could provide a new target for treating neurological disorders. [More]
Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

Scientists redraw traditional brain map of language comprehension

For 140 years, scientists' understanding of language comprehension in the brain came from individuals with stroke. Based on language impairments caused by stroke, scientists believed a single area of the brain -- a hotdog shaped section in the temporal lobe of the left hemisphere called Wernicke's region -- was the center of language comprehension. [More]
MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay announces additional positive results from MD1003 Phase III trial in patients with progressive MS

MedDay, a biotechnology company focused on the treatment of nervous system disorders, reports additional positive data from its pivotal Phase III clinical trial, MS-SPI, with MD1003, a highly-concentrated pharmaceutical grade biotin, in patients with Progressive Multiple Sclerosis. [More]
Study opens door to deeper understanding of genetic, molecular aspects underlying sleep disorders

Study opens door to deeper understanding of genetic, molecular aspects underlying sleep disorders

Washington State University Spokane scientists have grown a tiny group of brain cells that can be induced to fall asleep, wake up and even show rebound sleep after "staying up late." [More]
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