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Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

Researchers identify possible mechanism for re-growing damaged nerve fibres in central nervous system

A new discovery suggests it could one day be possible to chemically reprogram and repair damaged nerves after spinal cord injury or brain trauma. [More]
Experimental anticancer compound appears to reverse behaviors associated with schizophrenia

Experimental anticancer compound appears to reverse behaviors associated with schizophrenia

Johns Hopkins researchers say that an experimental anticancer compound appears to have reversed behaviors associated with schizophrenia and restored some lost brain cell function in adolescent mice with a rodent version of the devastating mental illness. [More]
Potassium boost improves walking, prolongs survival in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Potassium boost improves walking, prolongs survival in mouse model of Huntington's disease

Tweaking a specific cell type's ability to absorb potassium in the brain improved walking and prolonged survival in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, reports a UCLA study published March 30 in the online edition of Nature Neuroscience. The discovery could point to new drug targets for treating the devastating disease, which strikes one in every 20,000 Americans. [More]

Mirror neuron system faulty in schizophrenia patients

An imaging study suggests that a faulty mirror neuron system could underlie the social dysfunction seen in patients with schizophrenia. [More]
Scientists discover role of protons in neurotransmission

Scientists discover role of protons in neurotransmission

While probing how organisms sense gravity and acceleration, scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and the University of Utah uncovered evidence that acid (proton concentration) plays a key role in communication between neurons. [More]
Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Study points to potential culprit that kills motor neurons in ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is marked by a cascade of cellular and inflammatory events that weakens and kills vital motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The process is complex, involving cells that ordinarily protect the neurons from harm. Now, a new study by scientists in The Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital points to a potential culprit in this good-cell-gone-bad scenario, a key step toward the ultimate goal of developing a treatment. [More]
Stem cell research opens doors to potential new treatments for bipolar disorder

Stem cell research opens doors to potential new treatments for bipolar disorder

What makes a person bipolar, prone to manic highs and deep, depressed lows? Why does bipolar disorder run so strongly in families, even though no single gene is to blame? And why is it so hard to find new treatments for a condition that affects 200 million people worldwide? [More]

New subcellular mechanism identified for fast transmission in basket cells of the brain

In his third major research paper since December 2013, IST Austria Professor Peter Jonas together with his collaborator, postdoc Hua Hu, identifies a new subcellular mechanism for reliable, fast transmission in the so-called basket cells of the brain. [More]
Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

Sea lions exposed to toxin in algae develop form of epilepsy that is similar to humans

California sea lions exposed to a toxin in algae develop a form of epilepsy that is similar to one in humans, according to a new study led by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. [More]
Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists discover key mechanism that guides balance and limb movements

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have discovered an important mechanism underlying sensory feedback that guides balance and limb movements. [More]

Scientists discover molecular mechanism that actively regulates memory loss

In order to function properly, the human brain requires the ability not only to store but also to forget: Through memory loss, unnecessary information is deleted and the nervous system retains its plasticity. [More]
Researchers map visual system amplifier that is directly activated by walking or running

Researchers map visual system amplifier that is directly activated by walking or running

Whether you're a Major League outfielder chasing down a hard-hit ball or a lesser mortal navigating a busy city sidewalk, it pays to keep a close watch on your surroundings when walking or running. [More]

Research reveals that hippocampus stores memories by their temporal context

Before I left the house this morning, I let the cat out and started the dishwasher. Or was that yesterday? Very often, our memories must distinguish not just what happened and where, but when an event occurred - and what came before and after. [More]

Researchers identify novel protein that explains how biological clocks regulate human sleep

In a series of experiments sparked by fruit flies that couldn't sleep, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have identified a mutant gene - dubbed "Wide Awake" - that sabotages how the biological clock sets the timing for sleep. [More]

Brain-mapping experiment proves that schizophrenia patients have impaired ability to imitate

According to George Bernard Shaw, "Imitation is not just the sincerest form of flattery - it's the sincerest form of learning." According to psychologists, imitation is something that we all do whenever we learn a new skill, whether it is dancing or how to behave in specific social situations. [More]

Scientists uncover how inflammation and lack of oxygen cause brain damage

Scientists have uncovered how inflammation and lack of oxygen conspire to cause brain damage in conditions such as stroke and Alzheimer's disease. [More]

Schizophrenia patients show abnormal brain activity when imitating simple hand gestures

According to George Bernard Shaw, "Imitation is not just the sincerest form of flattery - it's the sincerest form of learning." According to psychologists, imitation is something that we all do whenever we learn a new skill, whether it is dancing or how to behave in specific social situations. [More]
Researchers find that brain cell regeneration may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers find that brain cell regeneration may alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease is the most widespread degenerative neurological disorder in the world. Over five million Americans live with it, and one in three senior citizens will die with the disease or a similar form of dementia. While memory loss is a common symptom of Alzheimer's, other behavioral manifestations - depression, loss of inhibition, delusions, agitation, anxiety, and aggression - can be even more challenging for victims and their families to live with. [More]
Research to identify exact mechanisms behind preterm birth and fetal brain injury

Research to identify exact mechanisms behind preterm birth and fetal brain injury

An inflammatory protein that triggers a pregnant mouse's immune response to an infection or other disease appears to cause brain injury in her fetus, but not the premature birth that was long believed to be linked with such neurologic damage in both rodents and humans, new Johns Hopkins-led research suggests. [More]
Stem cells from patients offer model, drug-discovery platform for early-onset form of Alzheimer's

Stem cells from patients offer model, drug-discovery platform for early-onset form of Alzheimer's

Harvard stem cell scientists have successfully converted skins cells from patients with early-onset Alzheimer's into the types of neurons that are affected by the disease, making it possible for the first time to study this leading form of dementia in living human cells. This may also make it possible to develop therapies far more quickly and accurately than before. [More]