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Study shows how damage to RNA-binding protein contributes to ALS

Study shows how damage to RNA-binding protein contributes to ALS

Although only 10 percent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases are hereditary, a significant number of them are caused by mutations that affect proteins that bind RNA, a type of genetic material. [More]
Domain Therapeutics and Medicxi partner to launch Mavalon Therapeutics

Domain Therapeutics and Medicxi partner to launch Mavalon Therapeutics

Domain Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company that specializes in the discovery and development of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) drugs, today announces the creation of Mavalon Therapeutics, a company focused on stopping the progression of Parkinson’s disease. [More]
MIT neuroscientists identify brain cells that play vital role in controlling appetite

MIT neuroscientists identify brain cells that play vital role in controlling appetite

MIT neuroscientists have discovered that brain cells called glial cells play a critical role in controlling appetite and feeding behavior. [More]
TSRI scientists elucidate how Zika virus attacks the brains of newborns

TSRI scientists elucidate how Zika virus attacks the brains of newborns

In a study that could one day help eliminate the tragic birth defects caused by Zika virus, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have elucidated how the virus attacks the brains of newborns, information that could accelerate the development of treatments. [More]
Measuring the activity of a mouse brain from a single snapshot

Measuring the activity of a mouse brain from a single snapshot

Drs Nicolas Renier and Zhuhao Wu are post-doctoral fellows in the laboratory of Marc Tessier-Lavigne, Carson Family Professor and head of the Laboratory of Brain Development and Repair and President of Rockefeller University in New York. Over recent years, they have co-developed methodologies for new imaging techniques applying light sheet microscopy. Their latest work shows the study of neuronal activity in intact brains. [More]
Researchers uncover disruption of stress-coping mechanism in Parkinson's disease

Researchers uncover disruption of stress-coping mechanism in Parkinson's disease

Leading-edge research by the team of professor Patrik Verstreken has shown for the first time that a malfunctioning stress-coping mechanism in the brain is at the root of Parkinson's disease. [More]
People with PTSD appear to suffer from disrupted context processing, say researchers

People with PTSD appear to suffer from disrupted context processing, say researchers

For decades, neuroscientists and physicians have tried to get to the bottom of the age-old mystery of post-traumatic stress disorder, to explain why only some people are vulnerable and why they experience so many symptoms and so much disability. [More]
DZNE scientists find new mechanism that allows damaged neurons to regenerate

DZNE scientists find new mechanism that allows damaged neurons to regenerate

Injuries to the spinal cord can cause paralysis and other permanent disabilities because severed nerve fibers do not regrow. Now, scientists of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases have succeeded in releasing a molecular brake that prevents the regeneration of nerve connections. [More]
Gut may play key role in preventing Parkinson's disease

Gut may play key role in preventing Parkinson's disease

Your gut may play a pivotal role in preventing the onset of Parkinson's disease. And the reason may be its knack for sleuthing. [More]
Structural instability in myelin membranes may instigate multiple sclerosis

Structural instability in myelin membranes may instigate multiple sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. It affects some 2.5 million people worldwide. It has no known cure. [More]
Mathematical model helps explain how the brain forms new memories without wiping out old ones

Mathematical model helps explain how the brain forms new memories without wiping out old ones

Columbia scientists have developed a new mathematical model that helps to explain how the human brain's biological complexity allows it to lay down new memories without wiping out old ones -- illustrating how the brain maintains the fidelity of memories for years, decades or even a lifetime. [More]
Hunger has stronger motivational force than fear, anxiety or thirst, study finds

Hunger has stronger motivational force than fear, anxiety or thirst, study finds

Hunger is a strong motivational force, with the capacity to curb rival drives states such as thirst, anxiety, fear of predators, and social needs, according to a study in mice published September 29 in Neuron. [More]
Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Super-resolution imaging of biological specimens: an interview with Dr. Manasa Gudheti

Traditional light microscopy techniques such as confocal and wide-field are diffraction-limited in resolution, which is about 200 nm laterally (in xy) and 500 to 600 nm axially (in z). Features that are closer than the diffraction limit will appear blurred in the image. [More]
Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Scientist uses stem cells derived from dental pulp to return hearing to deaf people

Deafness is a condition in which the hearing diminishes or disappears; currently there are few procedures to treat because it often is irreversible. Also, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), the disease globally affects 360 million people. [More]
Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

Scientists find way to reverse malfunctioning protein clumps involved in ALS

In the quest to understand the driving forces behind neurodegenerative diseases, researchers in recent years have zeroed in on clumps of malfunctioning proteins thought to kill neurons in the brain and spinal cord by jamming their cellular machinery. [More]
Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

Research re-opens door to possibility of stopping ongoing brain damage

A breakthrough in understanding how brain damage spreads - and how it could potentially be limited - has been made through a collaboration between neuroscientists and engineers at the Universities of Dundee and Strathclyde. [More]
Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

Memory and language deeply linked via the hippocampus, new experiment shows

A new study shows that when you finish your spouse's sentences or answer a fill-in-the-blank question, you're engaging the brain's relay station for memories, the hippocampus. [More]
De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

De-bookmarking could be key to better reprogramming of fibroblasts into iPS cells

In reading, a bookmark tells where you stopped. Cells use bookmarks too, specific proteins that help the cell remember what collection of genes needs to be turned on again after the brief halt of gene expression during cell division. [More]
Researchers propose new explanation for symptoms of fragile X syndrome

Researchers propose new explanation for symptoms of fragile X syndrome

Until recently, scientists thought they understood one of the underlying causes of fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability in the United States. [More]
Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

Researchers reveal previously unknown role of glutamate in neuromuscular development

For decades, scientists thought acetylcholine was the only neurotransmitter responsible for controlling how muscles and nerves are wired together during development. [More]
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