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Asthmatic adolescents develop greater dependence to nicotine compared to healthy counterparts

Asthmatic adolescents develop greater dependence to nicotine compared to healthy counterparts

Curiosity is a driving factor in why most kids start smoking, and the same is true for kids with asthma. [More]
Researcher receives $3 million NCI grant to study impact of e-cigarette usage on smoking rates

Researcher receives $3 million NCI grant to study impact of e-cigarette usage on smoking rates

Nearly 7 in 10 cigarette smokers are looking for a way to quit - and many smokers have turned to e-cigarettes for help. [More]
New review concludes effects of electronic cigarettes remain unchanged

New review concludes effects of electronic cigarettes remain unchanged

An updated Cochrane Review published today provides an independent, rigorous assessment of the best available evidence to date about electronic cigarettes for quitting smoking. [More]
Physicians vary greatly in their responses to patients about e-cigarettes, study reveals

Physicians vary greatly in their responses to patients about e-cigarettes, study reveals

If you ask two different doctors about e-cigarettes, you might get two different answers. [More]
Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Researchers using internet to find study participants may hamper recruitment of minority, poor people

Recruiting minorities and poor people to participate in medical research always has been challenging, and that may not change as researchers turn to the internet to find study participants and engage with them online, new research suggests. [More]
Smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine return to normal after quitting, study reports

Smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine return to normal after quitting, study reports

A new study in Biological Psychiatry reports that smoking-related deficits in brain dopamine, a chemical implicated in reward and addiction, return to normal three months after quitting. [More]
Integrative Body-Mind Training helps reduce smoking

Integrative Body-Mind Training helps reduce smoking

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday that 15.1 percent of American adults smoked cigarettes in 2015, down almost 2 percent from the year before. This is the lowest recorded smoking rate in the country's history. [More]
Study shows impact of reducing nicotine doses on body weight

Study shows impact of reducing nicotine doses on body weight

A study published today in Nicotine & Tobacco Research demonstrates in a carefully controlled series of studies that the self-administration of nicotine by rats suppresses body weight gain independent of food intake. [More]
FDA expands campaign to educate rural, white male teens about dangers of smokeless tobacco use

FDA expands campaign to educate rural, white male teens about dangers of smokeless tobacco use

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today it is expanding its award-winning "The Real Cost" campaign to educate rural, white male teenagers about the negative health consequences associated with smokeless tobacco use. For the first time, messages on the dangers of smokeless tobacco use – including nicotine addiction, gum disease, tooth loss, and multiple kinds of cancer – are being highlighted through the placement of advertisements in 35 U.S. markets specifically selected to reach the campaign's target audience. [More]
FDA-approved Alzheimer's medications may help people quit smoking

FDA-approved Alzheimer's medications may help people quit smoking

Despite several safe drug therapies available to help smokers quit, three-quarters report relapsing within six months of a quit attempt. University of Pennsylvania researchers Rebecca Ashare and Heath Schmidt saw potential for a permanent cessation solution in a class of FDA-approved medications used to improve cognitive impairments from Alzheimer's disease. [More]
TSRI scientists discover molecular ‘switch’ that could reduce nicotine addiction

TSRI scientists discover molecular ‘switch’ that could reduce nicotine addiction

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered that a lipid in brain cells may act as a “switch” to increase or decrease the motivation to consume nicotine. [More]
Small differences in specific genetic variant could alter nicotine consumption

Small differences in specific genetic variant could alter nicotine consumption

Nicotine is an addictive substance and genetic factors are known to play a role in smoking behaviors. Recently, a team of researchers at Penn State and the University of Colorado determined how small differences in a particular region of the mouse genome can alter nicotine consumption. [More]
Smoking rates remain alarmingly high among American Indians, LGBT smokers and people with mental health issues

Smoking rates remain alarmingly high among American Indians, LGBT smokers and people with mental health issues

While the overall number of people who smoke in the United States is at an all-time low, not everyone is quite ready to celebrate. "We're making great strides, but it's evident that there are large groups of people who continue to struggle with tobacco and the chronic diseases associated with it," said Amy Lukowski, Psy.D., clinical director of Health Initiatives at National Jewish Health in Denver and for its QuitLogix program, the largest non-profit smoking quitline in the country. [More]
UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

UF Health researcher reveals how betel nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain

For hundreds of millions of people around the world, chewing betel nut produces a cheap, quick high but also raises the risk of addiction and oral cancer. Now, new findings by a University of Florida Health researcher reveal how the nut's psychoactive chemical works in the brain and suggest that an addiction treatment may already exist. [More]
New research shows nicotine increases codeine-induced analgesia

New research shows nicotine increases codeine-induced analgesia

According to new research in rat models, nicotine use over time increases the speed that codeine is converted into morphine within the brain, by increasing the amount of a specific enzyme. It appears smokers' brains are being primed for a bigger buzz from this common pain killer - which could put them at a higher risk for addiction, and possibly even overdose. [More]
Study: Nurses can play pivotal role in helping reduce smoking rates in China

Study: Nurses can play pivotal role in helping reduce smoking rates in China

China has a big smoking problem. Three-hundred-fifty million Chinese people smoke and 1 million deaths a year in China are attributed to smoking-related illnesses. By 2020, that's expected to double to 2 million Chinese people dying annually from using tobacco. [More]
UK Biobank genetic study shows link between lung disease and smoking behaviour

UK Biobank genetic study shows link between lung disease and smoking behaviour

New research published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine and presented at this year's European Respiratory Society meeting in Amsterdam presents the first analyses of genetic data from the UK Biobank that reveal new associations with lung disease and smoking behaviour. [More]
Three studies point to mGluR2 as new molecular target for addiction treatment

Three studies point to mGluR2 as new molecular target for addiction treatment

The latest issue of Biological Psychiatry presents the results of three studies implicating metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) as a new molecular target for the treatment of addiction. [More]
Nicotine reinforcement demonstrated in study with ‘never-smokers’

Nicotine reinforcement demonstrated in study with ‘never-smokers’

In a study with 18 adults who had never smoked, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have demonstrated one of the earliest steps — nicotine “reinforcement” — in the process of addiction, and shown that some people are far more vulnerable to nicotine addiction than others. [More]
Study points to genetic/metabolic factors that make people vulnerable to nicotine addiction

Study points to genetic/metabolic factors that make people vulnerable to nicotine addiction

In a study with 18 adults who had never smoked, scientists at Johns Hopkins report they have demonstrated one of the earliest steps — nicotine "reinforcement" — in the process of addiction, and shown that some people are far more vulnerable to nicotine addiction than others. [More]
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