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Nuclear medicine is a branch or specialty of medicine and medical imaging that uses radioactive isotopes (radionuclides) and relies on the process of radioactive decay in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. In nuclear medicine procedures, radionuclides are combined with other chemical compounds or pharmaceuticals to form radiopharmaceuticals.
Toronto General Hospital unveils novel technology-based platform to improve patient care

Toronto General Hospital unveils novel technology-based platform to improve patient care

The Toronto General Hospital today becomes the first healthcare institution in the world to unveil a novel technology-based platform aimed at shortening the time required to translate medical research into clinical practice. This will enable faster diagnoses and more rapid treatment for patients with heart disease and other conditions that are detected using advanced medical imaging devices. [More]
Around 90% of all breast cancers can be diagnosed using MRI, shows study

Around 90% of all breast cancers can be diagnosed using MRI, shows study

Around 90 per cent of all breast cancers can be definitively diagnosed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This compares to the combined methods of mammography and ultrasound which yielded a detection rate of just 37.5 per cent. [More]
Most recent advances in nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging to be announced at ICNC 12

Most recent advances in nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging to be announced at ICNC 12

The latest advances in nuclear cardiology and cardiac CT imaging are set to be announced at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT 12. [More]
Multimodality at the Center for Advanced Biomedical Imaging: an interview with Professor Mark Lythgoe, UCL

Multimodality at the Center for Advanced Biomedical Imaging: an interview with Professor Mark Lythgoe, UCL

Imaging techniques used to live in medical physics departments, where physicists worked on them, but now we're seeing biologists, cell biologists and developmental biologists looking at cellular processes and it's those advances that are really enabling imaging to move forward in a way that it hasn't previously been able to... [More]
BAI researchers develop new brain image analysis method to better track amyloid changes

BAI researchers develop new brain image analysis method to better track amyloid changes

Researchers from Banner Alzheimer's Institute have developed a new brain image analysis method to better track the progression of beta-amyloid plaque deposition, a characteristic brain abnormality in Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published in the March issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

New radiation treatment for brain cancer implanted in first human being at CTRC

David Williams is the first human being ever to have a new radiation treatment implanted in the center of his brain tumor. [More]
Vrije University Brussels installs MILabs PET-SPECT-CT-MRI platform for nanobody research

Vrije University Brussels installs MILabs PET-SPECT-CT-MRI platform for nanobody research

The comprehensive MILabs PET-SPECT-CT-MR preclinical platform combines the best PET-SPECT functional imaging capabilities (sub-half-mm SPECT resolution and sub-mm PET resolution) with high resolution anatomical imaging from an integrated X-ray CT subsystem and/or a compact cryogen free 1.5 T MRI unit [More]
Nuclear medicine in Australia: an interview with Doug Cubbin, ANM Board Chairman

Nuclear medicine in Australia: an interview with Doug Cubbin, ANM Board Chairman

Molybdennum-99 is a central part of Australia’s modern medical system, and is by far the most commonly used radioisotope produced by ANSTO. It decays to Technetium-99m, which is potentially lifesaving as it is used in the diagnosis of heart, conditions, as well as diagnostic procedures associated with kidneys, lungs, bone and the liver. [More]
18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

18F-fluoride PET/MR imaging could diagnose cause of foot pain better than other methods

A single scan could diagnose the cause of foot pain better and with less radiation exposure to the patient than other methods, according to a study in the March 2015 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. [More]
Biomarker for compilation of Risk Score for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

Biomarker for compilation of Risk Score for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

40 percent of people in the EU suffer from non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (fatty liver disease), a disease which is becoming increasingly more frequent as a result of diabetes and excess weight in an affluent society. Currently, it is not possible to forecast the further course of the disease - right up to cirrhosis and cancer of the liver. Furthermore, an increased risk of heart attack and kidney damage exists. In future, this should become possible using a Risk Score with different biomarkers. [More]
Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

Johns Hopkins study shows value follow-up PET/CT scans in patients with lung cancer

New research from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine reveals a high value of scans which could lead to future change of reimbursement policies for follow-up positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) studies in lung cancer. The study, featured in the February 2015 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, establishes the value of fourth and subsequent follow-up PET/CT scans in clinical assessment and management change in patients with the disease. [More]
Techimmuna may help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis

Techimmuna may help diagnose rheumatoid arthritis

NCBJ POLATOM Radioisotope Centre has just introduced a new product to the nuclear medicine preparations market. Techimmuna will help to diagnose various cases of inflammation, in particular rheumatoid arthritis. [More]
Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

Lenvatinib trial offers hope for thyroid cancer patients

A new targeted therapy called lenvatinib has been shown to improve progression-free survival among patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to iodine-131. [More]
Novel technique could help identify cancerous tissue during brain tumor surgery

Novel technique could help identify cancerous tissue during brain tumor surgery

A novel radioguided surgery technique could quickly and effectively identify residual cancer cells during brain tumor surgery, with low radiation exposure for both patients and surgeons. The study, featured in the January 2015 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, reports that Y-90 DOTATOC, a beta-minus-emitting tracer, can effectively delineate the margins of meningiomas and high-grade gliomas. [More]
MU's Kattesh Katti named 2015 Hevesy Medal Award winner for contributing to nanomedicine

MU's Kattesh Katti named 2015 Hevesy Medal Award winner for contributing to nanomedicine

Gold nanoparticles have been proven useful in a number of medical applications. Scientists are developing nanoparticles to produce pharmaceuticals used in the imaging and diagnosis of diseases such as cancer, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and eye degeneration. [More]
ANSTO launches nuclear medicine program to improve diagnosis, treatment of cancer and heart disease

ANSTO launches nuclear medicine program to improve diagnosis, treatment of cancer and heart disease

You can’t see it, hear it or smell it, and it’s constantly changing: but despite that, Australia’s nuclear scientists have figured out how to more accurately measure the unit of activity for radionuclides, the Becquerel (Bq). [More]
SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

SPECT scan measures brain activity during seizures

Loyola University Medical Center is offering epileptic patients an imaging scan that records brain activity during seizures. [More]
Silvia Jurisson recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to cancer research

Silvia Jurisson recognized as AAAS Fellow for contributions to cancer research

Nuclear medicine is the branch of medicine that uses radioactive materials to provide diagnostics and treatments for cancer. Often, standard protocols involve using radioactive isotopes developed to image as well as weaken cancer cells in the body. With more than 30 years of research in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, Silvia Jurisson, a researcher at the University of Missouri, is a world-renowned scientist who continues to develop breakthrough materials used in the detection and treatment of cancer. [More]
Targeted therapy with radiopharmaceuticals has great potential for cancer treatment

Targeted therapy with radiopharmaceuticals has great potential for cancer treatment

Cancer therapy can be much more effective using a new way to customize nuclear medicine treatment, researchers say in the December 2014 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. The process could also be useful for other diseases that could benefit from targeted radiation. [More]
New fluorescence-imaging agent could improve diagnosis, guide surgeons during tumor removal

New fluorescence-imaging agent could improve diagnosis, guide surgeons during tumor removal

CEA-Leti and CLARA today announced the development of a new fluorescence-imaging agent that could significantly increase surgeons’ accuracy when removing cancerous tumors. [More]
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