Obstructive Sleep Apnea News and Research RSS Feed - Obstructive Sleep Apnea News and Research

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a major heath problem. In the United States, at least 17 million people have moderate to severe OSA, which is characterized by heavy snoring, airway blockage and frequent awakenings during sleep. OSA is one of the major causes of severe daytime sleepiness, and is a major risk factor for automobile accidents and workplace injuries. If left untreated, OSA has been implicated as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, including hypertension and heart failure, as well as stroke.

OSA is caused by collapse of the upper airway during sleep, and treatment for the disorder is based upon therapies that keep the airway open. The most common treatment for OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). At least 50% of patients with OSA find it difficult or impossible to use CPAP and are therefore candidates for surgery. However, current surgical options for these patients are very limited, particularly related to the tongue base.
Obstructive sleep apnea can increase risk for PE recurrence

Obstructive sleep apnea can increase risk for PE recurrence

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major risk for patients suffering from venous thromboembolism (VTE) and can often be fatal. [More]
Sleep apnea can make lung cancer more dangerous by increasing tumor growth

Sleep apnea can make lung cancer more dangerous by increasing tumor growth

A team of researchers from the University of Chicago and the University of Barcelona has found that intermittent hypoxia, or an irregular lack of air experienced by people with sleep apnea, can increase tumor growth by promoting the release of circulating exosomes. [More]
PAP therapy for sleep apnea may lead to positive outcomes among hypertensive patients

PAP therapy for sleep apnea may lead to positive outcomes among hypertensive patients

A new study shows that positive airway pressure (PAP) therapy for sleep apnea may have a positive impact on sleep-related functional outcomes among patients who also suffer from hypertension. [More]
Home non-invasive ventilation for COPD: an interview with Dr Holger Woehrle

Home non-invasive ventilation for COPD: an interview with Dr Holger Woehrle

The key symptom of COPD is breathlessness, especially during daily activity, and the breathlessness is in addition to cough and chest tightness. The difficulty in managing this disease is that it's a disease that progresses with age. [More]
Review examines link between insomnia and alcohol dependence

Review examines link between insomnia and alcohol dependence

Individuals with alcohol dependence (AD) often have sleep-related disorders such as insomnia, circadian-rhythm sleep disorders, breathing-related sleep disorders, movement disorders, and parasomnias such as sleep-related eating disorder, sleepwalking, nightmares, sleep paralysis, and REM sleep behavior disorder. [More]
CPAP therapy may help improve nighttime acid reflux symptoms in patients with OSA

CPAP therapy may help improve nighttime acid reflux symptoms in patients with OSA

A new study suggests that CPAP therapy may help improve the symptoms of nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. [More]
Noise levels in nightclubs may induce hearing loss

Noise levels in nightclubs may induce hearing loss

A new study raises concerns about the noise level in nightclubs. Researchers in Southern California have found that the average continuous level of noise in some nightclubs is at least 91.2 dBA (A-weighted decibels). [More]
Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Implanted nerve stimulator shows promise in treating central sleep apnea patients

Results from an international, randomized study show that an implanted nerve stimulator significantly improves symptoms in those with central sleep apnea, without causing serious side effects. [More]
CPAP treatment offers no cardiovascular benefit in OSA patients with heart disease risk

CPAP treatment offers no cardiovascular benefit in OSA patients with heart disease risk

More than 3 years of nightly treatment with a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) machine did not reduce cardiovascular risk more than usual care among patients with cardiovascular disease and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoxia linked to progression of NAFLD in obese adolescents

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have published a new study showing that sleep apnea worsens non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese adolescents. [More]
Report reveals staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S.

Report reveals staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea in the U.S.

Today the American Academy of Sleep Medicine released a new analysis, titled "Hidden health crisis costing America billions," that reveals the staggering cost of undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea. [More]
UCLA researchers develop noninvasive technique to treat breathing problems in premature babies

UCLA researchers develop noninvasive technique to treat breathing problems in premature babies

As humans evolved over many thousands of years, our bodies developed a system to help us when we start running and suddenly need more oxygen. Now, using that innate reflex as inspiration, UCLA researchers have developed a noninvasive way to treat potentially harmful breathing problems in babies who were born prematurely. [More]
Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Sleep-disordered breathing promotes progression of pediatric NAFLD to NASH

Studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea and low nighttime oxygen, which result in oxidative stress, are associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults. [More]
OSA patients face elevated risk of perioperative complications

OSA patients face elevated risk of perioperative complications

Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) face an elevated risk of perioperative complications; the risk is even higher if the diagnosis has not been made before surgery. [More]
Sleep researchers call for new diagnostic criteria to treat OSA in pregnant women

Sleep researchers call for new diagnostic criteria to treat OSA in pregnant women

Recent studies reveal that approximately one quarter of pregnant women may suffer from Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA), the recurrent cessation or limitation of normal breathing during sleep. [More]
Scientists measure eye pressure of sleeping patients to find link between OSAS and glaucoma

Scientists measure eye pressure of sleeping patients to find link between OSAS and glaucoma

Scientists at Hokkaido University have successfully measured the eye pressure of sleeping patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome for the first time, finding an unexpected correlation with glaucoma. [More]
Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

Study finds significant increase in age-adjusted prevalence of sleep disorders among U.S. veterans

A new study found a six-fold increase in the age-adjusted prevalence of any sleep disorder diagnosis over an 11-year period among U.S. veterans. [More]
UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

UCLA researchers find that male and female brains have opposite response patterns

While measuring brain activity with magnetic resonance imaging during blood pressure trials, UCLA researchers found that men and women had opposite responses in the right front of the insular cortex, a part of the brain integral to the experience of emotions, blood pressure control and self-awareness. [More]
U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

U-M researchers explore new way to improve cognitive issues in MS patients

Multiple sclerosis looks different from person to person. In many individuals, though, the difficulty in maintaining a sense of self and in keeping up intellectually can be the disease's most devastating manifestations. [More]
New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

New, implantable device offers promise for patients with OSA

Since the 1980s, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) - in which positive pressure is pushed through the nasal airways to help users breathe while sleeping - has been by far the most widely used treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). [More]
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