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Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy have declined nationally but still vary substantially across U.S. states, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. [More]
New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes. [More]
Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

As low-wage jobs continue to show strong gains since the recession, findings from the Low-Wage Workers' Health Project led by Upstate Medical University is offering insight into how these jobs affect public health and the economy in Syracuse, N.Y., and reflect national trends in issues related to low-wage workers. [More]
Injured patients who have alcohol in blood have reduced risk for developing complications

Injured patients who have alcohol in blood have reduced risk for developing complications

Injured patients who have alcohol in their blood have a reduced risk for developing cardiac and renal complications, according to a study from the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. [More]

SurModics launches BioFX Liquid Nova-Stop Solution for TMB microwell substrates

SurModics IVD, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of SurModics, Inc. and a market leader for in vitro diagnostic assay components, today announced the launch of BioFX® Liquid Nova-Stop Solution, a non-corrosive, non-hazardous stop solution for TMB microwell substrates. [More]
Interaction of stress and taste systems could help explain stress-related eating

Interaction of stress and taste systems could help explain stress-related eating

According to new research from the Monell Center, receptors for stress-activated hormones have been localized in oral taste cells responsible for detection of sweet, umami, and bitter. The findings suggest that these hormones, known as glucocorticoids, may act directly on taste receptor cells under conditions of stress to affect how these cells respond to sugars and certain other taste stimuli. [More]
Sound Physicians agrees to employ, manage hospitalist physicians at Mercy Hospital & Medical Center

Sound Physicians agrees to employ, manage hospitalist physicians at Mercy Hospital & Medical Center

Sound Physicians, a leading hospitalist organization focused on driving improvements in the quality, satisfaction and financial performance of inpatient healthcare delivery, announced today an agreement to employ and manage a team of hospitalist physicians at Mercy Hospital & Medical Center in Chicago, Ill. [More]
Research: Women's faces are rated as more attractive in presence of pleasant odors

Research: Women's faces are rated as more attractive in presence of pleasant odors

New research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center reveals that women's faces are rated as more attractive in the presence of pleasant odors. In contrast, odor pleasantness had less effect on the evaluation of age. [More]
Children who spend more hours in front of screen have high blood pressure

Children who spend more hours in front of screen have high blood pressure

A new study reveals that children who spend two hours or more in front of a screen (TV, computer, videogames etc.) have over 2.5 fold increase in their odds of having high blood pressure (BP). These odds are increased further by overweight and obesity. [More]
Study: Too much screen time can cause high blood pressure in children

Study: Too much screen time can cause high blood pressure in children

A new study reveals that children who spend two hours or more in front of a screen (TV, computer, videogames etc.) have over 2.5 fold increase in their odds of having high blood pressure (BP). These odds are increased further by overweight and obesity. The study also showed that children with a low level of fitness had 3.4 times higher odds of high BP than those with a high level of fitness. [More]
Air, surface sampling techniques used by US government effective in fighting bioterrorism, says study

Air, surface sampling techniques used by US government effective in fighting bioterrorism, says study

Air and surface sampling techniques currently used by the US government are effective in fighting bioterrorism and potentially saving lives, a Saint Louis University researcher finds. [More]
Research aims to help doctors estimate size of newborns

Research aims to help doctors estimate size of newborns

New Michigan State University research aims to help doctors estimate the size of newborns with a new set of birth weight measurements based on birth records from across the country. [More]
Leisure-time physical activity in midlife decreases risk of mobility limitation in old age

Leisure-time physical activity in midlife decreases risk of mobility limitation in old age

Strenuous occupational physical activity in midlife increases the risk of mobility limitation in old age, whereas leisure-time physical activity decreases the risk. This is found in a study which followed up 5,200 public sector employees for 28 years. The study was conducted at the Gerontology Research Center in Finland and the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health. [More]

Researchers explore fishing-related injuries and prevention strategies

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows. [More]
Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

Prenatal exposure to SSRIs linked with ASD and developmental delays in boys

In a study of nearly 1,000 mother-child pairs, researchers from the Bloomberg School of Public health found that prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), a frequently prescribed treatment for depression, anxiety and other disorders, was associated with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delays (DD) in boys. [More]
Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in kids at risk of undernourishment in low income countries

Antibiotics improve growth in children at risk of undernourishment in low and middle income countries, according to researchers at McGill University who have just conducted a research literature review on the subject. [More]
New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

​Our understanding of the role of body odor in conveying personal information continues to grow. New research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reveals that immunization can trigger a distinct change in body odor. This is the first demonstration of a bodily odor change due to immune activation. [More]
Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

A new study is giving hope to older men who are concerned about the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on their sexual health. [More]
New ambitious Government scheme to help people return to work from sick leave

New ambitious Government scheme to help people return to work from sick leave

A REPORT from University of Huddersfield experts has ensured that an ambitious Government scheme to help more people return to work from sick leave will include telephone support as a key component. [More]
Children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also prefer high levels of salt taste

Children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also prefer high levels of salt taste

Scientists from the Monell Chemical Senses Center have found that children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also most prefer high levels of salt taste and that, in general, children prefer sweeter and saltier tastes than do adults. [More]