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Study may help reduce sugar consumption, improve nutritional health of children

Study may help reduce sugar consumption, improve nutritional health of children

Everyone knows that children love sweets, but ever wonder why some kids seem to want more sugary food than others? It could be because they need more sugar to get that same sweet taste. According to new research from the Monell Center, sensitivity to sweet taste varies widely across school-aged children and is in part genetically-determined. [More]
Nurses help improve quality of care, drive down costs with different worksite-based care delivery

Nurses help improve quality of care, drive down costs with different worksite-based care delivery

There is growing recognition in this country that health depends largely on what happens outside of traditional health care settings—in the places where we live, learn, work, and play. Since many adults spend most of their waking lives at work, offices and worksites present a prime opportunity for improving health. [More]
Students introduced to da Vinci Robotic Surgical System at Saint Francis Memorial Hospital

Students introduced to da Vinci Robotic Surgical System at Saint Francis Memorial Hospital

On Tuesday, Oct. 27, fourth-through seventh-grade students from De Marillac Academy experienced first-hand what it is like to be a surgeon, thanks to the surgeons and operating room staff from Dignity Health Saint Francis Memorial Hospital. [More]
Newly revised Competencies in Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing published

Newly revised Competencies in Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing published

The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses, Inc. has published revised Competencies in Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing. [More]
Researchers find that pregnant women in Brooklyn have highest level of methyl paraben, propyl paraben

Researchers find that pregnant women in Brooklyn have highest level of methyl paraben, propyl paraben

Researchers at SUNY Downstate Medical Center and Arizona State University have published the first study of levels of parabens - antibacterial substances commonly used as preservatives in cosmetics and other products - in human cord blood samples. The researchers found that a cohort of pregnant women in Brooklyn predominantly of Caribbean- and African-American descent had the highest level worldwide of methyl paraben and propyl paraben. [More]
Major shift needed in global fight against tuberculosis, say researchers

Major shift needed in global fight against tuberculosis, say researchers

Unless there is a major shift in the way the world fights tuberculosis--from a reliance on biomedical solutions to an approach that combines biomedical interventions with social actions--the epidemic and drug resistance will worsen, say researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. [More]
UIC selected as one of six research centers to help control infectious diseases in health facilities

UIC selected as one of six research centers to help control infectious diseases in health facilities

The University of Illinois at Chicago has been selected as one of six research centers in the U.S. to help develop a comprehensive new strategy to control Ebola and other emerging infectious diseases in health facilities. [More]
SLU biostatistician encourages people to interpret scientific and medical research

SLU biostatistician encourages people to interpret scientific and medical research

Thanks to the internet, access to research studies, medical news and health websites is greater than ever, offering instant admission to the world of medical knowledge. [More]
Mount Sinai formally opens new Monroe, NY clinical center

Mount Sinai formally opens new Monroe, NY clinical center

Today elected officials and community representatives joined staff from the Mount Sinai Selikoff Centers for Occupational Health to formally open a new clinical center in Monroe, New York. As members of the New York State Department of Health's Occupational Health Clinic Network, the Selikoff Centers are the designated providers for the Lower Hudson Valley and New York City workforces, and leaders in the prevention and treatment of work-related injuries and illnesses. [More]
Partners Urgent Care announces opening of first urgent care center in Brookline, Massachusetts

Partners Urgent Care announces opening of first urgent care center in Brookline, Massachusetts

Partners Urgent Care today announced the opening of its first urgent care center in the town of Brookline, Massachusetts at 1285 Beacon Street. Partners Urgent Care is a collaboration between Partners HealthCare, an integrated health care system founded by Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital, and MedSpring Urgent Care. [More]
Doctors of chiropractic points out dangers of heavy backpacks

Doctors of chiropractic points out dangers of heavy backpacks

As students savor the last precious weeks of summer vacation, parents are out making the final run for school supplies. So, parents, take note: When back-to-school shopping this year there is one essential item that requires very special attention: your child's backpack. [More]
Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Retail meat harbors disease-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae, shows new study

Chicken, turkey and pork sold in grocery stores harbors disease-causing bacteria known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new study. The research, which was published online today in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, shows that contaminated meat may be an important source of human exposure to Klebsiella. [More]
Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network signs letter of intent to become member of Penn State Health

Tyrone Regional Health Network and Penn State Health have signed a letter of intent to enter into formal affiliation. With approval by organizational boards and state authorities, Tyrone Regional will become a member of Penn State Health. [More]
Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

Woman's weight during first pregnancy can negatively affect second baby

A woman's weight during her first pregnancy can affect how her second baby fares, Saint Louis University research finds. [More]
Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Antibiotics may increase risk of juvenile arthritis

Taking antibiotics may increase the risk that a child will develop juvenile arthritis, according to a study from Rutgers University, University of Pennsylvania and Nemours A.I. duPont Hospital for Children published today in Pediatrics. [More]
Genes affect person's perception of sweet taste

Genes affect person's perception of sweet taste

A new study from the Monell Center and collaborating institutions suggests that a single set of genes affects a person's perception of sweet taste, regardless of whether the sweetener is a natural sugar or a non-caloric sugar substitute. [More]
Opioid prescribing guidelines that focus high-dose use may need revision, say researchers

Opioid prescribing guidelines that focus high-dose use may need revision, say researchers

Overdoses of opioid pain medications frequently occur in people who aren't chronic users with high prescribed opioid doses--the groups targeted by current opioid prescribing guidelines, reports a study in the August issue of Medical Care. [More]
Rutgers' Martha Lansing named Family Physician of the Year by NJAFP

Rutgers' Martha Lansing named Family Physician of the Year by NJAFP

Martha Lansing, MD, associate professor and vice chair of family medicine and community health at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and a resident of Hopewell, NJ, has been named the Family Physician of the Year by the New Jersey Academy of Family Physicians. [More]
New editorial analyses role of GPs in sickness certification process

New editorial analyses role of GPs in sickness certification process

An editorial by primary care researchers at Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry, and published today, Monday 29 June 2015 in the British Journal of General Practice, analyses the GP role in the sickness certification process and the new Fit for Work scheme and suggests that GPs are key to supporting individuals to maintain the hope and belief that they can work, "rather than adding to the numbers of individuals off work on long term sickness who may have been able to work." [More]
Reducing short breaks between shifts enhances nurses' recovery from work

Reducing short breaks between shifts enhances nurses' recovery from work

Reducing short breaks between shifts helps nurses recover from work, according to a new study from Finland. The study analysed the effects of longer rest and recovery periods between shifts on heart rate variability, which is an indicator of recovery. [More]
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