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New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

New research reveals that immunization can trigger distinct change in body odor

​Our understanding of the role of body odor in conveying personal information continues to grow. New research from the Monell Chemical Senses Center and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reveals that immunization can trigger a distinct change in body odor. This is the first demonstration of a bodily odor change due to immune activation. [More]
Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

Study on effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on sexual health

A new study is giving hope to older men who are concerned about the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications on their sexual health. [More]
New ambitious Government scheme to help people return to work from sick leave

New ambitious Government scheme to help people return to work from sick leave

A REPORT from University of Huddersfield experts has ensured that an ambitious Government scheme to help more people return to work from sick leave will include telephone support as a key component. [More]
Children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also prefer high levels of salt taste

Children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also prefer high levels of salt taste

Scientists from the Monell Chemical Senses Center have found that children who most prefer high levels of sweet tastes also most prefer high levels of salt taste and that, in general, children prefer sweeter and saltier tastes than do adults. [More]
Two definitions of CMI symptoms should guide research and treatment of Gulf War veterans

Two definitions of CMI symptoms should guide research and treatment of Gulf War veterans

Two existing definitions of chronic multisymptom illness (CMI) -- one by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and another from a study of Kansas Gulf War veterans -- should be used by the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to guide research and treatment of Gulf War veterans, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. [More]
Novel approach to track Montreal consumers' food choices

Novel approach to track Montreal consumers' food choices

Poor food choices, such as overconsumption of carbonated soft drinks, are an important factor driving the global obesity epidemic and have been linked directly to diabetes and heart disease. While public health agencies are working to help people to make healthier choices, monitoring the effectiveness of these efforts has been costly and difficult. But now, using the same digital data employed by marketers to promote food products, McGill University's David Buckeridge has developed a way for health agencies to track Montreal consumers' food choices, neighborhood by neighborhood. [More]
AAOHN, ACOEM collaborate to study workplace health and safety issues linked with use of marijuana

AAOHN, ACOEM collaborate to study workplace health and safety issues linked with use of marijuana

The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses (AAOHN) and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) have announced they will collaborate to study workplace health and safety issues associated with worker impairment from the use of marijuana and other drugs. [More]
Patients who receive help from poison center have shorter hospital stays and lower medical costs

Patients who receive help from poison center have shorter hospital stays and lower medical costs

Patients who received help from a poison center had shorter hospital stays and lower hospital charges among those who are the most expensive to treat, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health. [More]
Monell Center announces advocacy program to identify biological causes of smell loss

Monell Center announces advocacy program to identify biological causes of smell loss

On Anosmia Awareness Day, the Monell Center announces "A Sense of Hope: The Monell Anosmia Project," a three-year $1.5M fundraising campaign to support a research and advocacy program focused on anosmia, the loss of the sense of smell. [More]
BU faculty develops physical therapy intervention to minimize workplace injury, reduce costs

BU faculty develops physical therapy intervention to minimize workplace injury, reduce costs

US employers pay nearly $1 billion each week for direct workers' compensation costs according to estimates from the US Department of Labor's Occupational Safety & Health Administration. [More]
Study determines effectiveness of gabapentin for treatment of vulvodynia in women

Study determines effectiveness of gabapentin for treatment of vulvodynia in women

A chronic syndrome called vulvodynia that affects from four to seven percent of women is being studied by physicians at The Women's Health Institute at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, part of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, in hopes of alleviating sometimes excruciating pain. [More]
Major gaps persist in workplace protection against TB, HIV and hepatitis in South Africa

Major gaps persist in workplace protection against TB, HIV and hepatitis in South Africa

A large-scale survey of South African healthcare workers has revealed major gaps in workplace protection against tuberculosis, HIV and hepatitis, according to a University of British Columbia health researcher. [More]
Odor-producing chemicals in earwax differ according to ethnic origin

Odor-producing chemicals in earwax differ according to ethnic origin

Scientists from the Monell Center have used analytical organic chemistry to identify the presence of odor-producing chemical compounds in human earwax. Further, they found that the amounts of these compounds differ between individuals of East Asian origin and Caucasians. [More]
Cystic Fibrosis Center receives Quality Care Award for commitment to improve quality of care in CF patients

Cystic Fibrosis Center receives Quality Care Award for commitment to improve quality of care in CF patients

The Cystic Fibrosis Center at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital has been selected by the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) for the foundation's prestigious Quality Care Award for 2012-2013. [More]
Exposure to pesticide may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease, say researchers

Exposure to pesticide may increase risk of Alzheimer's disease, say researchers

Scientists have known for more than 40 years that the synthetic pesticide DDT is harmful to bird habitats and a threat to the environment. [More]
New research reveals that humans can use odor to detect fat in food

New research reveals that humans can use odor to detect fat in food

New research from the Monell Center reveals humans can use the sense of smell to detect dietary fat in food. As food smell almost always is detected before taste, the findings identify one of the first sensory qualities that signals whether a food contains fat. [More]
Urban police officers working night shift more likely to suffer long-term on-the-job injuries

Urban police officers working night shift more likely to suffer long-term on-the-job injuries

Police officers working the night shift are significantly more likely to suffer long-term on-the-job injuries than officers on day and afternoon shifts, according to new research conducted at the University at Buffalo. [More]
UCSF study finds widespread exposure to banned endocrine disrupters

UCSF study finds widespread exposure to banned endocrine disrupters

​Americans are being exposed to significantly lower levels of some phthalates that were banned from children's articles in 2008, but exposures to other forms of these chemicals are rising steeply, according to a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. [More]

New initiatives launched to improve workplace mental health across Canada

The Mental Health Commission of Canada, along with its partners, CSA Group and Bureau de normalisation du Québec, joined Labour Minister Dr. K. Kellie Leitch alongside business and labour leaders today to announce new initiatives to improve workplace mental health across Canada. [More]
Apple Valley Medical Clinic Sleep Center moves to 14843 Energy Way in Apple Valley

Apple Valley Medical Clinic Sleep Center moves to 14843 Energy Way in Apple Valley

The Apple Valley Medical Clinic's Sleep Center has moved to 14843 Energy Way in Apple Valley. The center, which opened in 2010 under the medical direction of Scott Benson, M.D., a family medicine physician with the Apple Valley Medical Clinic, offers preventive care, diagnosis and referral for treatment of sleep disorders. [More]