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Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

Study: Common pesticide may alter the development of brain's dopamine system

A commonly used pesticide may alter the development of the brain's dopamine system -- responsible for emotional expression and cognitive function - and increase the risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children, according to a new Rutgers study. [More]
Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

Cardiologist promotes the importance of controlling high blood pressure

During Heart Month, the Cardiovascular Institute of New Jersey at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School is promoting the importance of controlling high blood pressure, also called hypertension, in order to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and other related chronic disorders in adults. [More]
Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center receives NIH grant to develop clinical tool that can predict anosmia

Monell Center scientist Kai Zhao, PhD, is principal investigator on a $1.5M 4-year grant from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, part of the National Institutes of Health, to further develop clinical methodology that can predict the path of air flow through a person's nasal passages. [More]
MedExpress physicians offer appropriate option to assess, treat flu or cold symptoms

MedExpress physicians offer appropriate option to assess, treat flu or cold symptoms

As flu season progresses, patients across the country continue to seek care for flu and illness symptoms at a variety of health care locations. From doctors' offices to emergency rooms, many patients find it difficult to determine the best option based on their symptoms. MedExpress physicians remind patients, that in many cases, urgent care centers offer a convenient, appropriate option for the assessment and treatment of non-severe flu or cold symptoms. [More]
Genetic finding could lead to new treatments for people living with blindness, vision loss

Genetic finding could lead to new treatments for people living with blindness, vision loss

Finding genes for retinal degenerations has immediate benefits for people living with blindness and vision loss, their families, and their physicians. Establishing a genetic cause confirms the clinical diagnosis at the molecular level, helps predict the future visual prognosis, suggests therapies, and allows some patients to join clinical trials. While more than 200 genes for retinal degenerations have been identified, approximately 40-50% of cases remain a mystery. [More]
Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

Higher human exposure to metal cadmium can lead to shorter telomeres

A new study led by a researcher at Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University looks at the metal cadmium and finds that higher human exposure can lead to significantly shorter telomeres, bits of DNA at the ends of chromosomes that are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other diseases of old age. [More]
New Drexel study sheds light on the role of socioeconomic environment on diabetes risk

New Drexel study sheds light on the role of socioeconomic environment on diabetes risk

As the linked epidemics of obesity and diabetes continue to escalate, a staggering one in five U.S. adults is projected to have diabetes by 2050. [More]

ExpressMed Medical Centers opens second Urgent Care location in Gahanna

ExpressMed Medical Centers opened its second Urgent Care location in Gahanna on October 20. The ExpressMed Gahanna Urgent Care is located at 445 Rocky Fork Blvd off Hamilton Road next to the Kroger. [More]
COMPAC-50 enables simultaneous electrophoresis of up to 50 COMET Assay slides

COMPAC-50 enables simultaneous electrophoresis of up to 50 COMET Assay slides

Developed in collaboration with the Oxidative Stress Group at the University of Leicester (Leicester, UK), the unique design of the COMPAC-50 enables simultaneous electrophoresis of up to 50 COMET Assay slides saving considerable lab space and reducing slide handling time by up to two-thirds when compared to previous standard methods. This would equate to a significant time-saving of up to 90% when handling 50 COMET Assay slides. [More]
Family physician  answers questions related to Ebola virus

Family physician answers questions related to Ebola virus

According to the Centers for Disease Control, the outbreak of Ebola in four West African countries is one of the largest outbreaks of the disease in history. [More]
AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

AAN releases new position statement on opioids for chronic non-cancer pain

According to a new position statement from the American Academy of Neurology, the risk of death, overdose, addiction or serious side effects with prescription opioids outweigh the benefits in chronic, non-cancer conditions such as headache, fibromyalgia and chronic low back pain. [More]
Specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards lower job-related injuries, illnesses for nurses

Specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards lower job-related injuries, illnesses for nurses

A 2004 California law mandating specific nurse-to-patient staffing standards in acute care hospitals significantly lowered job-related injuries and illnesses for both registered nurses and licensed practical nurses, according to UC Davis research published online in the International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health. [More]
Nearly half of hog workers carry livestock-associated bacteria to home

Nearly half of hog workers carry livestock-associated bacteria to home

A new study suggests that nearly half of workers who care for animals in large industrial hog farming operations may be carrying home livestock-associated bacteria in their noses, and that this potentially harmful bacteria remains with them up to four days after exposure. [More]
Study establishes significant link between residential greenness, birth outcomes

Study establishes significant link between residential greenness, birth outcomes

Mothers who live in neighborhoods with plenty of grass, trees or other green vegetation are more likely to deliver at full term and their babies are born at higher weights, compared to mothers who live in urban areas that aren't as green, a new study shows. [More]
Exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy may disrupt growth of boys

Exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy may disrupt growth of boys

A research consortium bringing together teams from Inserm, the Nancy and Poitiers University Hospitals, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, USA), and coordinated by the Inserm and University of Grenoble Environmental Epidemiology team (Unit 823), has just published an epidemiological study indicating that exposure to certain phenols during pregnancy, especially parabens and triclosan, may disrupt growth of boys during foetal growth and the first years of life. [More]
Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night associated with lowest risk of work absence

Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night associated with lowest risk of work absence

New research suggests that sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night is associated with the lowest risk of absence from work due to sickness. [More]
Cochrane review finds little evidence to support use of sleep or wake drugs for shift workers

Cochrane review finds little evidence to support use of sleep or wake drugs for shift workers

Shift workers are taking drugs to help them stay awake or get to sleep despite weak evidence for their benefit, according to a new Cochrane review. [More]
Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy vary substantially across U.S. states

Racial differences in life expectancy have declined nationally but still vary substantially across U.S. states, according to a new study by McGill University researchers. [More]
New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research reveals how expectations about odors can influence symptoms of asthma

New research from the Monell Center reveals that simply believing that an odor is potentially harmful can increase airway inflammation in asthmatics for at least 24 hours following exposure. The findings highlight the role that expectations can play in health-related outcomes. [More]
Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

Resarchers offer insight into how low-wage jobs affect public health, economy in Syracuse, N.Y.

As low-wage jobs continue to show strong gains since the recession, findings from the Low-Wage Workers' Health Project led by Upstate Medical University is offering insight into how these jobs affect public health and the economy in Syracuse, N.Y., and reflect national trends in issues related to low-wage workers. [More]
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