Optical Imaging News and Research RSS Feed - Optical Imaging News and Research

Researchers use fast-scanning PAM to see blood oxygenation, other functions inside living brain

Researchers use fast-scanning PAM to see blood oxygenation, other functions inside living brain

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body's tissues. Using a new high-speed, high-resolution imaging method, Lihong Wang, PhD, and his team at Washington University in St. Louis were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before. [More]
Milestones in microCT development: an interview with Alexander Sasov, CEO, Bruker MicroCT

Milestones in microCT development: an interview with Alexander Sasov, CEO, Bruker MicroCT

MicroCT (micron-scale computed tomography) technology was completely unknown when it began to be commercially available more than 15 years ago.... [More]
Doctoral students of Magicbullet network to develop 'gentle' cancer treatment

Doctoral students of Magicbullet network to develop 'gentle' cancer treatment

Medication that specifically targets cancer cells and delivers its active agent without harming healthy cells - this is what doctoral students of the Magicbullet network will be working on from mid-2015. Bielefeld University is coordinating the programme for the development of "gentle" cancer treatment. [More]
AXT adds TriFoil imaging products to their preclinical imaging portfolio

AXT adds TriFoil imaging products to their preclinical imaging portfolio

TriFoils flagship is the Triumph tri-modal imaging system that incorporates PET/SPECT and CT technologies all in a single instrument. It has a bore size of 15cm and an axial view of 30cm making ideal for small animal studies. [More]
AXT establishes preclinical imaging portfolio with MR solutions product lines

AXT establishes preclinical imaging portfolio with MR solutions product lines

To coincide with the start of Lorne Cancer conference, AXT are proud to announce the commencement of their distributorship with MR SOLUTIONS, a world leader in the development of innovative preclinical imaging solutions [More]
Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Photoacoustic imaging has potential to be used as noninvasive method to detect cervical cancer

Cervical cancer is, in many ways, a shining example of how successful the war on cancer can be. Thanks largely to the advent of Pap smear screening, U.S. cervical cancer deaths decreased dramatically, by more than 60 percent, between 1955 and 1992. In the last two decades, better treatment outcomes and more powerful imaging techniques have steadily pushed 5-year survival rates ever higher. [More]
Scientists use TPF-SHG microscopy to study effects of micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing

Scientists use TPF-SHG microscopy to study effects of micro-ablative fractional laser resurfacing

Many people in the Western World consider it as a social need to hide the effects of aging. For this purpose, different cutaneous rejuvenation treatments have been developed, including a laser-based technique, known as laser resurfacing. [More]
Photoacoustics could become alternative to mammography or sonogram for breast cancer detection

Photoacoustics could become alternative to mammography or sonogram for breast cancer detection

One of the lines of research of OILTEBIA, a European science project coordinated by Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, is a method to detect breast cancer based on photoacoustics and which could become an alternative to mammography or sonogram. [More]
Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

Live cell imaging solution launched by QImaging

QImaging™ today launched a new, all-in-one camera package that supports demanding live cell fluorescence imaging requirements. The Live Cell Imaging Package provides researchers with the sensitivity of EMCCD and the versatility of sCMOS camera technologies by combining QImaging’s Rolera™ Thunder EMCCD and optiMOS™ sCMOScameras. Now, researchers can address their unique imaging needs for a broader, more diverse set of scientific applications. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to map pulse pressure and elasticity of arteries in the brain

Researchers develop new technique to map pulse pressure and elasticity of arteries in the brain

Researchers at the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new technique that can noninvasively image the pulse pressure and elasticity of the arteries of the brain, revealing correlations between arterial health and aging. [More]
Noninvasive optical imaging device helps to detect changes linked with Alzheimer's disease

Noninvasive optical imaging device helps to detect changes linked with Alzheimer's disease

A noninvasive optical imaging device developed at Cedars-Sinai can provide early detection of changes that later occur in the brain and are a classic sign of Alzheimer's disease, according to preliminary results from investigators conducting a clinical trial in Australia. [More]
New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

New Tel Aviv University study finds link between Alzheimer's and brain hyperactivity

Patients with Alzheimer's disease run a high risk of seizures. While the amyloid-beta protein involved in the development and progression of Alzheimer's seems the most likely cause for this neuronal hyperactivity, how and why this elevated activity takes place hasn't yet been explained - until now. [More]
New method to help patients with cancer, genetic conditions, neurological disorders

New method to help patients with cancer, genetic conditions, neurological disorders

UT Arlington physics researchers may have developed a way to use laser technology to deliver drug and gene therapy at the cellular level without damaging surrounding tissue. The method eventually could help patients suffering from genetic conditions, cancers and neurological diseases. [More]
NIH awards $4 million to map developing human lung

NIH awards $4 million to map developing human lung

A team of investigators at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles has been awarded $4 million over five years by the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute for LungMAP, an atlas of the developing human lung. [More]

New technique identifies tumors in real time in operating room

Before they excise a tumor, surgeons need to determine exactly where the cancerous cells lie. Now, research published today in The Optical Society's (OSA) journal Optics Letters details a new technique that could give surgeons cheaper and more lightweight tools, such as goggles or hand-held devices, to identify tumors in real time in the operating room. [More]
Researchers reveal mysterious behavior of individual cells using radioluminescence microscopy

Researchers reveal mysterious behavior of individual cells using radioluminescence microscopy

With a new molecular imaging system powerful enough to peer down to 20-micrometer resolution, researchers can now use radioluminescence to examine the characteristics of single, unconnected cells. The result is a fascinating picture of diversity among cells previously assumed to behave the same, revealed researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting. [More]
Combination of novel molecular imaging techniques can help predict spread of cancer, patient survival

Combination of novel molecular imaging techniques can help predict spread of cancer, patient survival

A simple noninvasive blood test matched with state-of-the-art molecular imaging of individual cells could help oncologists understand their patients' chances of survival, say researchers at the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's 2014 Annual Meeting. [More]
New fNIRS -FD instrument can identify affected areas of brain

New fNIRS -FD instrument can identify affected areas of brain

Monitoring the rehabilitation of patients with neurological damage caused by a stroke, has encouraged Mexican scientists to work in the design and manufacture of a functional infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS -FD ) instrument capable of identifying the affected areas of the brain and the sites that were activated while analyzing the oxygen content in blood flow during therapy. [More]
New optical approach to brain scanning for patients with electronic implants

New optical approach to brain scanning for patients with electronic implants

Scientists have advanced a brain-scanning technology that tracks what the brain is doing by shining dozens of tiny LED lights on the head. This new generation of neuroimaging compares favorably to other approaches but avoids the radiation exposure and bulky magnets the others require, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
SapC-DOPS technology: New way to image glioblastoma multiforme tumors

SapC-DOPS technology: New way to image glioblastoma multiforme tumors

Just because you can't see something doesn't mean it's not there. Brain tumors are an extremely serious example of this and are not only difficult to treat-both adult and pediatric patients have a five-year survival rate of only 30 percent-but also have even been difficult to image, which could provide important information for deciding next steps in the treatment process. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement