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Professor receives $1M grant for biomedical imaging using bioluminescent gene reporters, MRI

​The W.M. Keck Foundation's Medical Research Program has presented a grant for $1 million to Angelique Louie, a professor and vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Biomedical Engineering. [More]
NIBIB-funded researchers develop microscopic technique to improve Mohs surgery

NIBIB-funded researchers develop microscopic technique to improve Mohs surgery

A common surgery for non-melanoma skin cancer, known as Mohs surgery typically achieves excellent results but can be a long process, as the surgeon successively removes the area of concern until the surrounding tissue is free of cancer. [More]
MRI method to map creatine in heart may help detect disorders earlier than traditional methods

MRI method to map creatine in heart may help detect disorders earlier than traditional methods

A new MRI method to map creatine at higher resolutions in the heart may help clinicians and scientists find abnormalities and disorders earlier than traditional diagnostic methods, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania suggest in a new study published online today in Nature Medicine. [More]

Brain's primary cortex generates efficiently compressed sensory information

​Ten million bits - that's the information volume transmitted every second with every quick eye movement from the eye to the cerebrum. Researchers from the Ruhr-Universit-t Bochum (RUB) and the University of Osnabr-ck describe the way those data are processed by the primary visual cortex, the entry point for the visual information into the brain, in the journal "Cerebral Cortex". [More]
New Opterra multipoint scanning confocal microscope from Bruker

New Opterra multipoint scanning confocal microscope from Bruker

Today at the 2013 American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting, Bruker introduced the Opterra Multipoint Scanning Confocal Microscope, which sets a new standard for integration of confocal imaging with photoactivation. [More]

MELA Sciences participates in skin cancer diagnostic workshop in Germany

MELA Sciences, Inc., designer and developer of MelaFind®, an FDA and CE Mark approved non-invasive optical device that assists dermatologists in diagnosing melanoma at its most curable stage, participated in a two-day hands-on skin cancer diagnostics workshop in Augsburg, Germany, where leading dermatologists examined "high-risk" melanoma patients with MelaFind® and also participated in an imaging devices exhibit. [More]
Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

Risk factors for Alzheimer's disease

Alzheimer's disease has joined cancer at the top of the list of feared diagnoses, and although Alzheimer's does have the potential to devastate millions of patients and families, there are reasons for hope - and possibly opportunities to reduce risk or alter the course of disease progression, according to Keith Black, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Neurosurgery at Cedars-Sinai. [More]
Seed grants support cancer diagnosis and treatment, vascular health research

Seed grants support cancer diagnosis and treatment, vascular health research

Five teams of scientists earned research seed grants awarded this year by the John S. Dunn Foundation. The awards support new collaborations by researchers at Rice University's BioScience Research Collaborative (BRC) and their partners at other institutional members of the Gulf Coast Consortia (GCC). [More]
NEI-funded study explores methods to improve diagnosis, treatment of common eye diseases

NEI-funded study explores methods to improve diagnosis, treatment of common eye diseases

If you've ever been sleep-deprived, you've probably had a firsthand glimpse of the blood vessels in your eyes. But what you haven't seen—and what many eye care professionals cannot see as well as they would like—are the vessels closest to the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. [More]
Seven promising scientists named 2013 NYSCF - Robertson Investigators

Seven promising scientists named 2013 NYSCF - Robertson Investigators

The New York Stem Cell Foundation today named seven of the most promising scientists as its 2013 NYSCF - Robertson Investigators. [More]
New optical imaging technique can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes

New optical imaging technique can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes

An optical imaging technique that measures metabolic activity in cancer cells can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes, and it can detect responses to treatment as early as two days after therapy administration, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. [More]
A window to the brain: an interview with Professor Guillermo Aguilar, UC Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE)

A window to the brain: an interview with Professor Guillermo Aguilar, UC Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering (BCOE)

It is literally a transparent window made of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which we envision to become a suitable cranial implant that allows physicians for optical access to the tissue brain. It would serve the same mechanical function of current cranial implants made of other materials, such as titanium, except that it would enable optical access too, which could be very beneficial for post-operatory diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. [More]

Virginia Tech to conduct workshop on Neuroscience of Cognition, Computation, and Decisions

Nearly two dozen of the world's leading neuroscientists will gather in Switzerland next month to share their latest findings on the mysteries of how the brain processes information and makes decisions. [More]

New optical imaging tool enables scientists to observe tumors and uncover inner workings

Scientists seeking new ways to fight cancer often try to understand the subtle, often invisible, changes to DNA, proteins, cells, and tissue that alter the body's normal biology and cause disease. [More]
Research suggests possibility of using cell transplants to treat schizophrenia

Research suggests possibility of using cell transplants to treat schizophrenia

Research from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio suggests the exciting possibility of using cell transplants to treat schizophrenia. [More]
Non-invasive optical techniques use LED, laser to view beneath skin

Non-invasive optical techniques use LED, laser to view beneath skin

Impressive examples of new non-invasive optical techniques using lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and spectroscopic methods to probe and render images from beneath the surface of the skin are featured in a newly completed special section in the Journal of Biomedical Optics published by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. [More]
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center secures "outstanding" rating from NCI

Case Comprehensive Cancer Center secures "outstanding" rating from NCI

The Case Comprehensive Cancer Center (CCCC) again demonstrated the compelling power of partnership in securing an overall rating of "outstanding" and a five-year renewal of its grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). [More]

New study reveals how control of brain blood flow develops with age

​A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain. The paper, which the scientists say could change the way researchers study brain development in infants and children, is published in the February 18 Early Online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). [More]
MILabs VECTor/CT installed by Molecular Imaging Center Antwerp (MICA) in Belgium

MILabs VECTor/CT installed by Molecular Imaging Center Antwerp (MICA) in Belgium

MILabs B.V. is pleased to announce that the Molecular Imaging Center Antwerp (MICA) in Belgium has installed a MILabs VECTor/CT to enhance their portfolio of pre-clinical nuclear oncology and neurology imaging and research capabilities. [More]

Gene therapy does not slow or halt progression of cell loss in Leber congenital amaurosis

Independent clinical trials, including one conducted at the Scheie Eye Institute at the Perelman School of Medicine, have reported safety and efficacy for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), a congenital form of blindness caused by mutations in a gene (RPE65) required for recycling vitamin A in the retina. Inherited retinal degenerative diseases were previously considered untreatable and incurable. [More]