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According to the Arthritis Foundation, 66 million (nearly one in three adults) suffer from chronic joint pain and 21 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, which is characterized by a breakdown of the cartilage and a deterioration of the fluid in a joint. The symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, from moderate to severe, and stiffness. Most people who have osteoarthritis are older than age 45, and women are more commonly affected than men.
Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Antibiotic exposure in infancy linked to childhood obesity

Repeated exposure to broad-spectrum antibiotics in the first two years of life is associated with early childhood obesity, say researchers from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia in a retrospective study based on data from electronic health records from the extensive CHOP Care Network. [More]
Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

Studies explain why some people are at greater risk for ACL injury than others

The successful rise and fall of an athlete's moving body relies on an orchestrated response of bones, joints, ligaments and tendons, putting the many angles and intersecting planes - literally the geometry - of a critical part like a knee joint to the test. But it's more than just a footfall error at the root of one of the most devastating of sports injuries: the ACL or anterior cruciate ligament tear. [More]
Neuropathic pain phenotype identified in knee osteoarthritis

Neuropathic pain phenotype identified in knee osteoarthritis

Some patients with knee osteoarthritis may experience neuropathic-like symptoms associated with central pain processing, reflecting a discrete phenotype, study findings suggest. [More]
Fat mass contributes to musculoskeletal pain risk

Fat mass contributes to musculoskeletal pain risk

People with high fat mass could be at an increased risk of musculoskeletal pain, say researchers. [More]
MOVANTIK tablets get FDA approval for treatment of OIC in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain

MOVANTIK tablets get FDA approval for treatment of OIC in patients with chronic, non-cancer pain

Nektar Therapeutics reported today that partner AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved MOVANTIK (naloxegol) tablets as the first once-daily oral peripherally-acting mu-opioid receptor antagonist (PAMORA) medication for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation (OIC), in adult patients with chronic, non-cancer pain. [More]
Inadequate pain relief common in knee osteoarthritis

Inadequate pain relief common in knee osteoarthritis

Patients with knee osteoarthritis requiring analgesic therapy are often not receiving adequate pain relief, researchers report. [More]
Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

A better understanding of the pathology of a severe form of dwarfism as well as a possible window of treatment have been discovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Around 9.6% of women diagnosed with dry eye disease, treated with artificial tear eye drops

Around 9.6% of women diagnosed with dry eye disease, treated with artificial tear eye drops

The symptoms of dry eye disease include the sensation of grit in the eye, frequently accompanied by itching, burning and visual disturbance. The causes are poorly understood. [More]
Ampio updates phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion for knee osteoarthritis

Ampio updates phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion for knee osteoarthritis

Ampio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced an update on the phase III, multicenter, double-blind STEP study of Ampion™ for osteoarthritis of the knee. [More]
Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Comprehensive fitness and nutrition regimens may prevent bone and muscle deterioration

Being physically active may significantly improve musculoskeletal and overall health, and minimize or delay the effects of aging, according to a review of the latest research on senior athletes (ages 65 and up) appearing in the September issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS). [More]
Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Research roundup: Benefits of hip surgery; preventing surgical infections; assessing ACOs' predecessors

Surgical treatment of hip fractures can achieve better survival and functional outcomes than nonoperative treatment, but less is known about its economic benefits. ... We estimated the effects of surgical treatment for displaced hip fractures through a Markov cohort analysis of patients 65 years and older. ... Estimated average lifetime societal benefits per patient exceeded the direct medical costs of hip fracture surgery by $65,000 to $68,000 for displaced hip fractures. With the exception of the assumption of nursing home use, the sensitivity analyses show that surgery produces positive net societal savings (Gu, Koenig, Mather and Tongue, 8/5). [More]
Knee pain when using stairs early clue to OA

Knee pain when using stairs early clue to OA

Feeling knee pain during weight-bearing activities involving knee bending, such as using stairs, could be an early sign of osteoarthritis and the need for intervention, research indicates. [More]
New biomarker may improve diagnosis of early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

New biomarker may improve diagnosis of early-stage rheumatoid arthritis

A novel biomarker for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has significant potential to help physicians better identify early-stage disease, when treatment can often arrest further disease progression and disability, according to a new study in The Journal of Rheumatology. [More]
Patients with mild osteoarthritis may not benefit from knee surgery

Patients with mild osteoarthritis may not benefit from knee surgery

A new study indicates that there is no apparent benefit to arthroscopic knee surgery for age-related tears of the meniscus in comparison with nonsurgical or sham treatments. [More]
Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter

Here are highlights from the August issue of Mayo Clinic Health Letter. You may cite this publication as often as you wish. Reprinting is allowed for a fee. Mayo Clinic Health Letter attribution is required. [More]
Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources expands disease-level coverage of Treatment Algorithms Insight Series

Decision Resources has expanded its disease-level coverage of the Treatment Algorithms Insight Series, which examines U.S. physicians' prescribing behavior, to provide a quantitative analysis of an agent's penetration into each line of therapy. [More]
New mechanism of joint destruction grinds away healthy cartilage, worsens osteoarthritis

New mechanism of joint destruction grinds away healthy cartilage, worsens osteoarthritis

A new mechanism of joint destruction caused by a natural material that grinds away healthy cartilage and worsens osteoarthritis has been identified in human hip joints for the first time by University of Liverpool scientists. [More]
Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Experts explain pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes

Enzyme supplements available without a prescription are becoming increasingly popular, but should everyone add them to their shopping list? Brent Bauer, M.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Complementary and Integrative Medicine Program, is co-author of a new paper in the medical journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on the pros and cons of over-the-counter enzymes. [More]
Opioid use does not impair reverse shoulder arthroplasty success

Opioid use does not impair reverse shoulder arthroplasty success

Taking opioids prior to reverse shoulder arthroplasty does not hamper patients’ chances of having successful outcomes, researchers have found. [More]
Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

Activity level predicts how well patients recover from injuries after treatment

According to a literature review in the July issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, patients' activity level is a strong predictor for how well they will do with certain treatments and how well they recover from injuries after treatment. Patients are encouraged to ask their orthopaedic surgeon if activity level is an important factor in their treatment decision. [More]