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According to the Arthritis Foundation, 66 million (nearly one in three adults) suffer from chronic joint pain and 21 million Americans suffer from osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, which is characterized by a breakdown of the cartilage and a deterioration of the fluid in a joint. The symptoms of osteoarthritis include pain, from moderate to severe, and stiffness. Most people who have osteoarthritis are older than age 45, and women are more commonly affected than men.
AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

AOSSM to present awards and grants to encourage cutting-edge research in orthopaedic sports medicine

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine will present ten research awards and seven grants during its Annual Meeting, July 9-12 in Orlando, FL. [More]
FDA accepts proposed brand name Invossa for TissueGene-C

FDA accepts proposed brand name Invossa for TissueGene-C

TissueGene, Inc. today reported that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) accepted the proposed brand name Invossa for TissueGene-C, the Company's proprietary product in development for treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee. FDA's acceptance of the proprietary brand name is subject to the Agency's final determination prior to any approval of the product's Biologic License Application (BLA) and market launch. [More]
Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Steady rise in obesity, excess weight also signals upward swing in chronic health conditions

Obesity and excess weight, and their negative impact on health, have become a significant focus for physicians and other health-care experts in recent years. [More]
ScinoPharm Taiwan, Raffles PharmaTech collaborate to manufacture Celecoxib

ScinoPharm Taiwan, Raffles PharmaTech collaborate to manufacture Celecoxib

ScinoPharm Taiwan, Ltd. and Raffles PharmaTech announced today the collaboration to manufacture "Celecoxib," a non-steroidal and anti-inflammatory analgesic active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). [More]
New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

New tissue 'scaffold' technology could one day help produce large organs

Scientists have developed a new tissue 'scaffold' technology that could one day enable the engineering of large organs. Research led by the Universities of Bristol and Liverpool has shown that it is possible to combine cells with a special scaffold to produce living tissue in the laboratory. It is hoped this can then be implanted into patients as a way of replacing diseased parts of the body. [More]
Hydroxychloroquine drug fails to reduce mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis

Hydroxychloroquine drug fails to reduce mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis

The results of an interventional trial presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2015) showed that use of the disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug hydroxychloroquine for 24 weeks did not diminish mild-moderate pain from primary hand osteoarthritis (OA). [More]
Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio reports effects of Ampion in treating chronic pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee

Ampio Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced three peer-review publications that report the multifaceted and synergistic effects of Ampion in the treatment of osteoarthritis in the knee. [More]
GBD analysis shows over 95% of global population has health problems

GBD analysis shows over 95% of global population has health problems

Just one in 20 people worldwide (4·3%) had no health problems in 2013, with a third of the world's population (2·3 billion individuals) experiencing more than five ailments, according to a major new analysis from the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2013, published in The Lancet. [More]
New study reports that poor sleep habits increase pain in knee OA

New study reports that poor sleep habits increase pain in knee OA

A new study reports that patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA) who have poor sleep habits display greater central sensitization--an amplification of clinical pain. Findings published in Arthritis Care & Research, a journal of the American College of Rheumatology, further show OA patients who catastrophize--consumed by thoughts of pain--had increased central sensitization that was associated with greater clinical pain. [More]
Study on human growth hormone for ACL tear recovery receives funding from Mark Cuban Foundation

Study on human growth hormone for ACL tear recovery receives funding from Mark Cuban Foundation

Funding from the Mark Cuban Foundation, run by the well-known owner of the Dallas Mavericks, will allow University of Michigan scientists and physicians to study how human growth hormone may aid recovery from an ACL tear - one of the most frequent, traumatic and dreaded knee injuries among athletes. [More]
TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

TSRI scientists awarded $2.2 million NIH grant to advance innovative approach to obesity treatment

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have been awarded nearly $2.2 million by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health to advance an innovative approach to the treatment of obesity, a serious health problem that affects more than one-third of all Americans. [More]
New Health Union study finds severe impact of rheumatoid arthritis on patients' quality of life

New Health Union study finds severe impact of rheumatoid arthritis on patients' quality of life

In a new national survey of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, Health Union found a severe impact on quality of life, employment, and ability to afford treatment. The autoimmune condition attacks the body, resulting in joint inflammation, pain, stiffness, and swelling, but may also harm other organs. About 1.3 million Americans or about one percent of the global population have RA. [More]
Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia now considered as a lifelong central nervous system disorder

Fibromyalgia is the second most common rheumatic disorder behind osteoarthritis and, though still widely misunderstood, is now considered to be a lifelong central nervous system disorder, which is responsible for amplified pain that shoots through the body in those who suffer from it. [More]
Study could provide new approaches to treating meniscal injuries

Study could provide new approaches to treating meniscal injuries

Within the knee, two specialized, C-shaped pads of tissue called menisci perform many functions that are critical to knee-joint health. The menisci, best known as the shock absorbers in the knee, help disperse pressure, reduce friction and nourish the knee. [More]
UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

UI orthopedics researchers working on injectable, bioactive gel that can repair cartilage damage

Knee injuries are the bane of athletes everywhere, from professionals and college stars to weekend warriors. Current surgical options for repairing damaged cartilage caused by knee injuries are costly, can have complications, and often are not very effective in the long run. Even after surgery, cartilage degeneration can progress leading to painful arthritis. [More]
Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Teen-LABS research study reveals musculoskeletal disease outcomes among obese adolescents

Outcomes regarding musculoskeletal disease among severely obese adolescents participating in the "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study were published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. Teen-LABS is a multi-center clinical study funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at the National Institutes of Health that is examining the safety and health effects of surgical weight loss procedures. [More]
Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

Study shows link between upright locomotion and spinal health

A Simon Fraser University researcher has uncovered what may be the first quantified evidence demonstrating a relationship between upright locomotion and spinal health. [More]
Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. [More]
NEFIGAN Trial of Nefecon for treatment of primary IgA nephropathy meets primary endpoint

NEFIGAN Trial of Nefecon for treatment of primary IgA nephropathy meets primary endpoint

Pharmalink AB, a specialty pharma company, today announces that the NEFIGAN Trial of Nefecon for the treatment of primary IgA nephropathy has fully met its primary efficacy endpoint at a planned interim analysis and been stopped early with respect to statistical analysis of the endpoint. [More]
ACA calls for 'conservative care first' approach to low-back pain

ACA calls for 'conservative care first' approach to low-back pain

The American Chiropractic Association, in response to recent research calling into question the efficacy of acetaminophen in the management of spinal pain, strongly encourages patients and healthcare providers to consider the benefits of a conservative approach to back pain. [More]
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