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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Bioenergetic analysis of pancreatic beta-cells shows impaired metabolic signature in type 2 diabetes patients

Impaired activation of mitochondrial energy metabolism in the presence of glucose has been demonstrated in pancreatic beta-cells from patients with type 2 diabetes. The cause of this dysfunction has been unknown. Publishing online in Endocrinology, Buck Institute assistant research professor Akos Gerencser, PhD, shows that in patients with type 2 diabetes the balance between supply and demand of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔψM) is altered causing a decrease in the signaling that turns on insulin secretion. [More]
Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

Endocrine Society recommends removal of tumor as first-line treatment for endogenous Cushing's syndrome

The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline (CPG) on strategies for treating Cushing's syndrome, a condition caused by overexposure to the hormone cortisol. [More]
IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

IOF, EOS to jointly hold Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting in Abu Dhabi

With a growing senior population and an increase in unhealthy lifestyles, the prevalence of osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus is soaring in the Middle East and North African region. In response to the dramatic increase in these diseases within the region the International Osteoporosis Foundation, in cooperation with the Emirates Osteoporosis Society, will be holding the 3rd Middle East & Africa Osteoporosis Meeting from December 5-7, 2015 in Abu Dhabi. [More]
Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium lowers involuntary motor movements in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Low-dose lithium reduced involuntary motor movements - the troubling side effect of the medication most commonly used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) - in a mouse model of the condition that is diagnosed in about 60,000 Americans each year. The third in a series of studies from the Andersen lab involving PD and low-dose lithium, the results add to mounting evidence that low-doses of the psychotropic drug could benefit patients suffering from the incurable, degenerative condition. [More]
Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
New book provides overview of treatment options for paediatric calcium and bone disorders

New book provides overview of treatment options for paediatric calcium and bone disorders

Knowledge about paediatric calcium and bone disorders has increased rapidly over the past twenty years. Great advances have been made in the underlying genetic basis for many conditions, in bone density and geometry imaging and in the development of new treatment options, calling for a new edition of 'Calcium and Bone Disorders in Children and Adolescents' which was first published in 2009. [More]
Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

Endocrine Society selects 18 endocrinologists as winners of 2016 Laureate Awards

The Endocrine Society today announced it has chosen 18 accomplished endocrinologists as winners of the organization's prestigious 2016 Laureate Awards. [More]
New orthobiologics products can benefit both patients and surgeons

New orthobiologics products can benefit both patients and surgeons

Autografts, the gold standard of bone grafts, have several limitations. As a result, new orthobiologics products are being developed for the benefit of patients as well as surgeons. [More]
Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

Hospital for Special Surgery named top hospital in nation for orthopedics for sixth consecutive year

For the sixth consecutive year, Hospital for Special Surgery has been ranked the top hospital in the country for orthopedics by U.S. News & World Report in its 2015 "Best Hospitals" survey. The hospital was also nationally recognized as a leader in rheumatology, ranking No. 3 in association with NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital. [More]
New UTMB study finds no association between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins

New UTMB study finds no association between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston of more than 30,000 commercially insured men is the first large comparative analysis to show that there is no link between testosterone therapy and blood clots in veins. The study found that middle-aged and older men who receive testosterone therapy are not at increased risk of this illness. [More]
Study shows that moderate suppression of TSH may be enough even in high-risk thyroid cancer

Study shows that moderate suppression of TSH may be enough even in high-risk thyroid cancer

A study of long-term thyroid cancer outcomes shows, among other findings, that moderate suppression of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which drives the disease, may be as beneficial as more extreme hormone suppression. [More]
New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

New study shows cannabinoid cannabidiol can help heal bone fractures

Cannabis -- marijuana, hashish -- was used as a go-to medical remedy by societies around the world for centuries. But the therapeutic use of marijuana was banned in most countries in the 1930s and '40s due to a growing awareness of the dangers of addiction. The significant medical benefits of marijuana in alleviating symptoms of such diseases as Parkinson's, cancer, and multiple sclerosis have only recently been reinvestigated. [More]
Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice may be harmful to health

Following restrictive sun exposure advice in countries with low solar intensity like Canada might in fact be harmful to your health, says the co-author of a new study on sunlight and vitamin D. [More]
Postmenopausal women with kidney, bladder stones not at increased risk for osteoporosis

Postmenopausal women with kidney, bladder stones not at increased risk for osteoporosis

Postmenopausal women with kidney or bladder stones are not at increased risk for osteoporosis, but they do have about a 15 percent increased risk of another painful stone, physician-scientists report. [More]
Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Study could provide paradigm shift in treatment of age-related disease, cancer

Intermittent dosing with rapamycin selectively breaks the cascade of inflammatory events that follow cellular senescence, a phenomena in which cells cease to divide in response to DNA damaging agents, including many chemotherapies. [More]
Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

Special issue provides comprehensive overview of latest findings in the area of skeletal research

While there is good understanding of how bone mass, and more recently bone architecture, affects fracture risk, far less is known about the material properties of bone, or how these can impart resilience or fragility to the skeleton. [More]
Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Dietary fat intake could potentially ease mitochondrial disease, shows research

Mice that have a genetic version of mitochondrial disease can easily be mistaken for much older animals by the time they are nine months old: they have thinning grey hair, osteoporosis, poor hearing, infertility, heart problems and have lost weight. Despite having this disease at birth, these mice have a "secret weapon" in their youth that staves off signs of aging for a time. [More]
Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

Scientists identify association between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis

University of Southampton scientists have discovered a link between coronary heart disease and osteoporosis, suggesting both conditions could have similar causes. [More]
Study suggests that dried plums may help support healthy bones

Study suggests that dried plums may help support healthy bones

The International Symposium on Nutritional Aspects of Osteoporosis brings together the best scientific minds in bone health research and nutrition. Current research presented at the 2015 Ninth ISNAO has added to the increasing body of evidence that suggests dried plums (prunes) help to support healthy bones and may even promote attainment of peak bone mass. [More]
New article shows taxonomic classification of rare genetic bone disorders based on metabolic phenotypes

New article shows taxonomic classification of rare genetic bone disorders based on metabolic phenotypes

An International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group on Skeletal Rare Diseases has published a new classification of rare genetic metabolic bone disorders (RGMBDs) according to their metabolic pathogenesis. [More]
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