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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
NOF provides evidence-based guidance to help children and adolescents attain optimal bone health

NOF provides evidence-based guidance to help children and adolescents attain optimal bone health

The National Osteoporosis Foundation today released a position statement providing evidence-based guidance and a national implementation strategy to help children and adolescents achieve optimal bone health, or what is known as "peak bone mass," early in life. [More]
To reduce skin cancer risk, Vitamin D deficient Aussies should supplement

To reduce skin cancer risk, Vitamin D deficient Aussies should supplement

Health pioneers BetterYou are advising those looking to boost their levels of the ‘sunshine vitamin’ to supplement orally as a safer alternative to lengthy UV exposure. [More]
Scientific breakthrough could contribute to early diagnosis of osteoporosis, Alzheimer's

Scientific breakthrough could contribute to early diagnosis of osteoporosis, Alzheimer's

Scientists from the University of Granada have developed a new fluorescent dye capable of detecting, in a single test lasting 20 minutes, the presence of phosphate and biothiol inside living cells. This scientific breakthrough could contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of diseases such as osteoporosis, Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes, and prostate cancer, since abnormal levels of both substances are associated with these diseases. [More]
UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

UCLA researchers find protein combination that could improve clinical bone restoration

A UCLA research team has found a combination of proteins that could significantly improve clinical bone restoration. The findings may be a big step toward developing effective therapeutic treatments for bone skeletal defects, bone loss and osteoporosis. [More]
10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

10 million of us lack sunshine vitamin

Health pioneers BetterYou have welcomed the views of Nutritionist Marilyn Glenville, that ‘oil based supplements can help you get your recommended dose of vitamin D’. [More]
Oestrogen supplements could reduce dementia risk in women

Oestrogen supplements could reduce dementia risk in women

Women who take oestrogen supplements from before or at the start of menopause and continue with them for a few years have better preserved brain structure, which may reduce the risk of dementia. [More]
Novel technique helps identify diabetic patients at risk of bone fractures

Novel technique helps identify diabetic patients at risk of bone fractures

A Southampton study using high resolution imaging to create a "virtual bone biopsy" has shed new light on why people with type 2 diabetes are at risk of bone fractures. [More]
Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

Simple blood test could help eliminate B12 deficiencies among older adults in long-term care homes

A high proportion of older adults entering long-term care homes in Ontario are B12 deficient, with more developing deficiencies over the course of their first year in residence, according to research from the University of Waterloo. There is a connection between B12 deficiency and several serious health conditions. [More]
UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

UConn-led researchers identify specific gene linked to Hajdu-Cheney syndrome

Fragile bones are usually an old person's affliction, but sometimes children are born with them. Now, a team of researchers led by UConn professor Ernesto Canalis has shown in mice that a specific gene can cause the disease, called Hajdu-Cheney syndrome. Overabundant bone-absorbing cells may be causing the disorder's characteristic bone loss, and the researchers hope to find a potential treatment. [More]
New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

New discovery may help researchers tackle mitochondrial diseases and age-related diseases

Buck Institute faculty Judith Campisi, PhD, says age researchers need to stop thinking of cellular senescence, now accepted as an important driver of aging, as a single phenotype that stems from genotoxic stress. Research from her lab reveals that cellular senescence, a process whereby cells permanently lose the ability to divide, is also induced by signaling from dysfunctional mitochondria - and that the arrested cells secrete a distinctly different "stew" of biologically active factors in a process unrelated to the damaging free radicals that are created in mitochondria as part of oxygen metabolism. [More]
Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Combining NELL-1 with BMP2 therapy may promote bone development

Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP2) is used clinically to promote bone repair. However, the high BMP2 concentrations required to stimulate bone growth in humans may produce life-threatening adverse effects such as cervical swelling in spinal fusion procedures, a problem that prompted an FDA warning in 2008. [More]
Major bone fracture may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life

Major bone fracture may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life

Breaking a major bone may increase risk of widespread chronic body pain in later life, a new study has found. [More]
New editorial calls on doctors to individualize treatment decisions based on patients' fracture risk

New editorial calls on doctors to individualize treatment decisions based on patients' fracture risk

A new editorial published by an International Osteoporosis Foundation Working Group urges physicians to individualize treatment decisions based on their patients' fracture risk, rather than automatically interrupting or stopping bisphosphonate therapy after five or three years. [More]
Zoledronate drug can protect stem cells from ageing

Zoledronate drug can protect stem cells from ageing

Stem cells can be protected from the effects of ageing by a drug currently used to treat patients with osteoporosis, a breakthrough study has found. [More]
Active individuals may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce risk of stress fractures

Active individuals may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce risk of stress fractures

Vitamin D plays a crucial role in ensuring appropriate bone density. Active individuals who enjoy participating in higher impact activities may need to maintain higher vitamin D levels to reduce their risk of stress fractures, report investigators in The Journal of Foot & Ankle Surgery. [More]
Monoclonal antibody reduces relapse rate by 18% in postmenopausal, HR-positive breast cancer patients

Monoclonal antibody reduces relapse rate by 18% in postmenopausal, HR-positive breast cancer patients

Giving a monoclonal antibody (denosumab) as adjuvant therapy with aromatase inhibitors in postmenopausal, hormone-receptor-positive breast cancer patients reduces the relapse rate by 18%. This is the central finding of the ABCSG 18 breast cancer study regarding disease-free survival. [More]
Adjuvant denosumab improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with early-stage, HR+ breast cancer

Adjuvant denosumab improves disease-free survival for postmenopausal women with early-stage, HR+ breast cancer

Adding denosumab to adjuvant aromatase inhibitor therapy improved disease-free survival for postmenopausal patients with early-stage, hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer, according to results from the phase III ABCSG-18 clinical trial presented at the 2015 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, held Dec. 8-12. [More]
Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

Combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone may speed healing process for bone fractures

A combination of adult stem cells and parathyroid hormone significantly increased new bone formation in laboratory animals and may speed the healing process for human bone fractures caused by osteoporosis, a new study shows. [More]
Cadmium exposure increases risk of osteoporosis and fractures

Cadmium exposure increases risk of osteoporosis and fractures

People who are exposed to higher levels of cadmium have an increased risk of osteoporosis and fractures. Cadmium also affects the kidneys. A doctoral thesis at Sahlgrenska Academy explored this issue in a study of over 900 older men. [More]
Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

Reduced bone mass puts critically ill patients at greater risk for fractures

One year after being hospitalized in intensive care, patients have reduced bone mass that puts them at greater risk for fractures, according to a new study published online ahead of print in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. [More]
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