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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.

Scientist receives $1.8M defense grant from Kessler Foundation for spinal cord injury research

Kessler Foundation has been named awardee of a three-year grant for $1.8 million from the Department of Defense Spinal Cord Injury Research Program. Gail Forrest, PT, PhD, is principal investigator for the randomized, double-blinded, controlled, multi-site clinical trial, which will test strategies to improve bone and muscle strength after spinal cord injury. Dr. Forrest is assistant director of Human Performance & Engineering Research at Kessler Foundation. [More]
Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Hydrogen sulfide regulates bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, shows study

Stem cells in bone marrow need to produce hydrogen sulfide in order to properly multiply and form bone tissue, according to a new study from the Center for Craniofacial Molecular Biology at the Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry of USC. [More]
Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

Drugs used to treat osteoporosis appear to prevent cell membrane repair

A class of drugs widely used to treat osteoporosis appears to impede a cell's ability to repair a protective outer membrane that helps determine what enters and exits, researchers report. [More]
New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

New guidelines on management and return to play of Female Athlete Triad discussed at AMSSM

The Female Athlete Triad is a medical condition often observed in physically active girls and women, and involves three components: low energy availability with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction and low bone mineral density. [More]

New procedure helps curtail complication rate associated with bone grafting

UT Arlington and Texas Health Arlington Memorial Hospital are investigating whether bone grown from the body's own stem cells can replace traditional types of bone grafting. [More]

Genkyotex’s GKT137831 reverses lung fibrosis in new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Genkyotex, the leading developer of selective NOX enzyme inhibitors, announced today the publication of data showing that GKT137831, a first in class NOX1 and 4 inhibitor, was able to reverse lung fibrosis associated with aging in a new model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. [More]
Two endocrinology societies announce comprehensive framework to combat obesity

Two endocrinology societies announce comprehensive framework to combat obesity

Calling it the most under-reimbursed major disease in America, two endocrinology societies announced an evidence-based, multidimensional, comprehensive framework to combat the nation's obesity epidemic today. [More]

Meta-analysis shows calcium supplementation does not raise coronary heart disease in elderly women

The results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases do not support the hypothesis that calcium supplementation, with or without vitamin D, increases coronary heart disease or all-cause mortality risk in elderly women. [More]

President of Ukrainian Osteoporosis Association wins CNS Medal for contribution to cause of osteoporosis prevention

​Today, Dr Vladyslav Povoroznyuk, President of the Ukrainian Osteoporosis Association, was awarded the first Committee of National Societies (CNS) Medal. The CNS Medal recognizes an individual CNS representative who has made an important contribution to the cause of osteoporosis prevention through active participation in CNS activities and by expanding IOF's messages and outreach in his/her country. [More]

Experts provides guidance to ensure safe, effective physical activity for osteoporosis patients

​Today, experts from the Too Fit to Fracture Initiative presented the results of an international consensus process to establish exercise recommendations for people with osteoporosis, with or without spine fractures. [More]
Higher education level linked with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women

Higher education level linked with decreased fracture incidence among non-white women

If you are a middle-aged African-American or Asian woman, your social class may play a significant role in how likely you are to suffer bone fractures, a UCLA-led study suggests. [More]
Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Study examines link between higher screen time and bone mineral density in adolescents

Results of a study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, showed that in boys, higher screen time was adversely associated to bone mineral density (BMD) at all sites even when adjusted for specific lifestyle factors. [More]

Study investigates link between bone microstructure in postmenopausal women and prevalent ankle fracture

A study by researchers at the University of Geneva concludes that prevalent ankle fractures should be considered as osteoporotic fractures and taken into account in fracture-risk assessment. [More]

Vitamin D insufficiency contributes to increased 10-year fracture risk in elderly women

A study presented today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases shows that long-term low levels of vitamin D intake are associated with higher 10-year fracture risk in elderly women. [More]
Many women and children in Vietnam have vitamin D and calcium deficiency

Many women and children in Vietnam have vitamin D and calcium deficiency

Many women and children in Vietnam have a vitamin D or calcium insufficiency or deficiency. Unknown until know, this is a public health issue whose magnitude has just been discovered by researchers at the IRD and the National Nutrition Institute of Hanoi. [More]

High levels of protein intake and exercise improve bone structure, strength in pre-pubertal boys

​A study presented during the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Seville shows that high levels of protein intake (HProt) enhance the positive impact of high physical activity (HPA) on bone structure and strength in healthy pre-pubertal boys.

Researchers from the University of Geneva in Switzerland and Eindhoven University in the Netherlands tracked 176 healthy pre-pubertal boy [More]

Researchers evaluate cost-effectiveness of osteoporosis screening strategy using FRAX

​In new research presented at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases today, investigators showed that an osteoporosis screening strategy using FRAX as a pre-screening tool is cost-effective if the follow up of the screening and medication adherence are optimized. [More]
Fourth Herbert A. Fleisch ESCEO-IOF Medal awarded to Belgian researcher at Ghent University Hospital

Fourth Herbert A. Fleisch ESCEO-IOF Medal awarded to Belgian researcher at Ghent University Hospital

​The 4th Herbert A. Fleisch ESCEO-IOF Medal was awarded today to eminent Belgian researcher Jean-Marc Kaufman, Professor of Medicine at the Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. [More]

Experts gather for World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases

Investigators and clinicians from more than 60 countries will gather today in Seville, Spain for the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases. [More]

International Osteoporosis Foundation launches FRAX App to assess risk of osteoporotic fracture

​Osteoporosis management guidelines around the world now recommend that fracture risk assessment be part of any clinical evaluation for osteoporosis. As a result, rather than relying on bone mineral density values alone, physicians now consider future fracture risk when making treatment decisions. [More]