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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
Brittle bones does not significantly affect occurrence of bone fractures among older people

Brittle bones does not significantly affect occurrence of bone fractures among older people

Anti-osteoporotic medication is not an effective means for preventing hip fractures among the elderly, concludes a study recently published in the BMJ. According to Professor Teppo Järvinen from the University of Helsinki, who heads the research group, the prevalent assumption that brittle bones cause hip fractures is fundamentally flawed. [More]
Subclinical hyperthyroidism linked to increased fracture risk

Subclinical hyperthyroidism linked to increased fracture risk

In an analysis that included more than 70,000 participants from 13 studies, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with an increased risk for hip and other fractures including spine, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is a low serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration in a person without clinical symptoms and normal thyroid hormone concentrations on blood tests. [More]
National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

Most people associate osteoporosis with women. But the truth is, one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of this condition. That's more men than will have prostate cancer, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. [More]
Scientists working together to help parents motivate children to increase calcium intake

Scientists working together to help parents motivate children to increase calcium intake

Scientists from 11 land-grant institutions and Brigham Young University are working together to help parents motivate children to boost calcium intake to strengthen bones and prevent bone fractures from occurring later in life. [More]
Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

As many people in the lupus community prepare to come together in support of World Lupus Day (May 10), a global survey shows that systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have difficulty describing their symptoms to their physicians, which leads to a gap in physicians understanding the full impact the illness has on patients' lives. [More]
Penn State College of Medicine awarded PCORI grant to study exercise program for older adults

Penn State College of Medicine awarded PCORI grant to study exercise program for older adults

Penn State College of Medicine was awarded nearly $14 million in funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study the effectiveness of a program integrating strength training, balance exercises and walking for older adults who have had a fall-related fracture. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide Technologies, the development company focused on solid dose formulations of therapeutics and vaccines and non-invasive diagnostics, today announced that its novel solid dose formulation of teriparatide (parathyroid hormone) achieved successful results in a pre-clinical proof-of-concept study comparing it with the currently marketed liquid product (Forteo/Forsteo). [More]
Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Although it is now widely recognised that a poor start to life has long-term effects on a child's later ability to learn, the mechanisms by which the environment in early life affects later life chances are poorly understood. [More]
Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin protein plays key role in bone loss associated with osteoinflammatory disease

Adseverin, a protein found in the body, has been identified as the key driver behind the bone loss associated with the world's most common inflammatory disease: gum disease, or periodontitis. [More]
Rocket carrying Reinnervate's Alvetex Scaffold blasts into Space to find better treatments for bone loss

Rocket carrying Reinnervate's Alvetex Scaffold blasts into Space to find better treatments for bone loss

Market leading 3D cell culture company Reinnervate Ltd, part of the ReproCELL group, today announced that a rocket carrying its Alvetex Scaffold technology blasted into Space this week. Alvetex will be used in experiments on board the International Space Station. [More]
Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith presents favorable data from PREVAIL OLE study of Qudexy XR capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. presented data from a 52-week, open-label extension study (PREVAIL OLE) showing that Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules offered a long-term adjunctive treatment option with a favorable tolerability profile for a high proportion of patients with refractory partial-onset seizures (POS). [More]
Scientists find link between higher muscle mass and healthier bone development in children

Scientists find link between higher muscle mass and healthier bone development in children

Scientists at the University of Southampton have shown that higher muscle mass is strongly linked with healthier bone development in children. [More]
Osteocyte study in space: Researchers to analyze effects of microgravity on osteocyte cultures

Osteocyte study in space: Researchers to analyze effects of microgravity on osteocyte cultures

Researchers may be "excyted" to learn that osteocyte cultures are headed to the International Space Station this spring for the first time. With their delivery on the next SpaceX commercial resupply services mission this month, the Osteocytes and mechano-transduction (Osteo-4) investigation team will analyze the effects of microgravity on this type of bone cell. [More]
Incidence, costs of osteoporotic fractures in China to double by 2035

Incidence, costs of osteoporotic fractures in China to double by 2035

The results of the first study using a health economics model to project osteoporosis-related fractures and costs for the Chinese population, shows that the country's healthcare system will face a dramatic rise in costs over the next few decades. [More]
American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

American Oil Chemists' Society honors UMass Amherst food scientist

The American Oil Chemists' Society has honored University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientist Yeonhwa Park with the Timothy L. Mounts Award for her "significant and important contributions in the area of bioactive lipids and their impact on health conditions such as obesity, osteoporosis, arthritis and cardiovascular disease." [More]

Regular strength training still beneficial for older people

In Austria, around ten per cent of over-65-year-olds are frail, while a further 40 per cent are in a preliminary stage of frailty. The Healthy For Life project, with the MedUni Vienna as the academic lead, aims to raise fitness levels and quality of life for older people whose nutritional condition is inadequate. [More]
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