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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

The first large prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and bone health in postmenopausal women has found that those who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers with no menopausal symptoms. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center has earned the coveted Baby-Friendly designation. This verifies that the hospital has implemented the ten steps to help new mothers successfully breastfeed. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Latest research from the University of Surrey has found that the potassium salts (bicarbonate and citrate) plentiful in fruit and vegetables, play an important part in improving bone health. For the first time, the results also showed that these potassium salts reduce bone resorption, the process by which bone is broken down, therefore increasing their strength. [More]
TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

Mutations in a gene that helps repair damaged chromosome ends may make smokers — especially female smokers — more susceptible to emphysema, according to results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers. [More]
Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Life satisfaction associated with higher bone density in older women

Women aged 60-70 who are satisfied with their lives have a higher bone density and they suffer from osteoporosis less frequently than their unsatisfied peers, according to a recent study completed at the University of Eastern Finland. [More]
Adding Tomosynthesis to standard mammography improves breast cancer screening, reduces radiation level

Adding Tomosynthesis to standard mammography improves breast cancer screening, reduces radiation level

Dr. Lisa Weinstock, Director of Women's Digital Imaging in Ridgewood, said she has added Hologic Low-Dose 3-D Mammography (Breast Tomosynthesis) with C-View 2-D Imaging to enhance breast cancer screening of patients. [More]
Three common health problems tied to oral health

Three common health problems tied to oral health

Many people think that going to the dentist is all about getting a bright and shining smile. While this is an important aspect of dentistry, an experienced dentist like Farzad Feiz, DDS, of Calabasas Dental Group and California Dental Care can also help patients with their overall health. [More]

Research shows modern humans have less bone density than earlier human ancestors

New research shows that modern human skeletons evolved into their lightly built form only relatively recently — after the start of the Holocene about 12,000 years ago, and even more recently in some human populations. [More]
Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Broccoli can help reduce HGPS-related defects

Children who suffer from Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome age prematurely due to a defective protein in their cells. Scientists at Technische Universität München have now identified another important pathological factor: the system responsible for removing cellular debris and for breaking down defective proteins operates at lower levels in HGPS cells than in normal cells. The researchers have succeeded in reactivating protein breakdown in HGPS cells and thus reducing disease-related defects by using a substance from broccoli. [More]
WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

WSU researchers working on better bone-like materials used in hip and knee replacements

Washington State University researchers are working to improve materials used in hip and knee replacements so that they last longer and allow patients to quickly get back on their feet after surgery. [More]
New study examines efficacy of brace application for treatment of spinal compression fractures

New study examines efficacy of brace application for treatment of spinal compression fractures

Compression fractures in the spine due to osteoporosis, a common condition causing progressive bone loss and increased fracture risk, are especially common in older women. A new study appearing in the December 3rd issue of the Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery found that patients who wore a brace as treatment for a spinal compression fracture had comparable outcomes in terms of pain, function and healing when compared to patients who did not wear a brace. [More]
Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

Endocrinologist examines benefits and harms of testosterone therapy

An article in the latest edition of Australian Prescriber looks at the prescribing of testosterone, often used for ‘male menopause’ symptoms such as reduced energy, poor concentration and increased body fat. Over the past decade there has been a steep rise in the amount of testosterone dispensed in Australia and globally. [More]
Alizé Pharma obtains exclusive worldwide rights to develop new therapy for bone diseases

Alizé Pharma obtains exclusive worldwide rights to develop new therapy for bone diseases

Alizé Pharma III SAS, an Alizé Pharma group company specialized in the development of biopharmaceuticals to treat metabolic disorders and rare diseases, today announces that it has acquired exclusive worldwide rights to develop and commercialize a new family of peptides with bone anabolic properties. [More]
Study explores use of bisphosphonates for men receiving androgen deprivation therapy

Study explores use of bisphosphonates for men receiving androgen deprivation therapy

Although some guidelines recommend use of bisphosphonates (a class of drugs used to strengthen bone) for men on androgen deprivation therapy, an analysis finds that prescriptions for these drugs remains low, even for those men at high risk of subsequent fractures, according to a study in the December 3 issue of JAMA. [More]
Researchers use MRI techniques to study consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure

Researchers use MRI techniques to study consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure

Researchers from the Translational Developmental Neuroscience Lab led by Professor Stefan Ehrlich at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus at the TU Dresden (Faculty of Medicine) used state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to investigate the consequences of anorexia nervosa on brain structure. [More]
Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

Commonly used osteoporosis medications may also prevent lung, breast and colon cancers

The most commonly used medications for osteoporosis worldwide, bisphosphonates, may also prevent certain kinds of lung, breast and colon cancers, according to two studies led by researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [More]
Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

Researchers discover molecular switch that triggers stress processes in the brain

At the Center for Brain Research at the MedUni Vienna an important factor for stress has been identified in collaboration with the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm (Sweden). This is the protein secretagogin that plays an important role in the release of the stress hormone CRH and which only then enables stress processes in the brain to be transmitted to the pituitary gland and then onwards to the organs. [More]