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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
New guidance to prevent bisphosphonate-related atypical femoral fractures

New guidance to prevent bisphosphonate-related atypical femoral fractures

Physicians worldwide frequently prescribe bisphosphonates such as alendronate (Fosamax) and ibandronate (Boniva) to treat osteoporosis and prevent fragility fractures. Unfortunately, long-term bisphosphonate use has been linked to an increased risk of atypical femoral fractures. [More]
Study debunks false reports surrounding risk of hormone therapy

Study debunks false reports surrounding risk of hormone therapy

For over a decade, hormone therapy (HT) has been a hot topic in medicine. Unfortunately, women are still confused and concerned about using HT after two federally-funded studies linked HT to potentially serious health risks. [More]
Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

Scientists discover DNA vaccine that alleviates chronic inflammation in the body

An international team of scientists including CureLab Oncology, Inc. (Boston), University of Camerino (Italy), and Boston University have serendipitously discovered a DNA vaccine, which systemically alleviates chronic inflammation in the body. Since osteoporosis is an inflammatory disease, preventive and therapeutic effects of the new vaccine were demonstrated on mouse models with osteoporosis. [More]
High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

High-impact exercise improves patellar cartilage quality of postmenopausal women at risk of osteoporosis

Progressive high-impact training improved the patellar cartilage quality of the postmenopausal women who may be at risk of osteoporosis (bone loss) as well as at risk of osteoarthritis. [More]
Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may be at increased risk for gum disease

Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may be at increased risk for gum disease

Postmenopausal women susceptible to bone fractures may also be a higher risk for gum disease, according to researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and Case/Cleveland Clinic Postmenopausal Health Collaboration. [More]
Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Harmless plant extract can help treat Cushing Disease

Cushing Disease, not to be confused with Cushing's Syndrome, is caused by a tumour in the pituitary gland in the brain. The tumour secrets increased amounts of the stress hormone adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) followed by cortisol release from the adrenal glands leading to rapid weight gain, elevated blood pressure and muscular weakness. [More]
Camp Twinkletoes improves lives of children suffering from juvenile arthritis

Camp Twinkletoes improves lives of children suffering from juvenile arthritis

Throughout NSW, there are more than 6,000 children suffering from the extreme pain and fatigue of juvenile arthritis. Usually thought of as an ‘older persons’ disease, arthritis in children is a very real condition, and in extreme cases can even result in death. [More]
Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Researchers develop new method for preventing destructive activity of osteoclasts

Most existing treatments for pathological bone loss inhibit osteoclasts (bone-destroying cells) to limit bone degradation. However, by doing this, they also prevent bone formation since it is stimulated by the presence of these very same osteoclast cells. Researchers from the CNRS, Inserm and the Université de Montpellier and Université Jean Monnet - Saint-étienne have developed a new approach for preventing the destructive activity of osteoclasts without affecting their viability. [More]
Griffith study shows resistance training improves bone, muscle strength in post-menopausal women

Griffith study shows resistance training improves bone, muscle strength in post-menopausal women

Big improvements in strength with no injuries have been the hallmarks of success with a Griffith University study looking at the physical function of post-menopausal women. [More]
Sleep apnea may cause some cases of osteoporosis

Sleep apnea may cause some cases of osteoporosis

The daily rhythm of bone turnover is likely important for normal bone health, and recent research suggests that sleep apnea may be an unrecognized cause of some cases of osteoporosis. Sleep apnea's effects on sleep duration and quality, oxygen levels, inflammation, and other aspects of health may have a variety of impacts on bone metabolism. [More]
Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Exposure to certain chemicals may lead to early menopause

Women who are exposed to certain chemicals are more likely to experience menopause at a younger age, according to a newly published study by a researcher from the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus. [More]
Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

Gluten-free diet important for people with celiac disease

You'd never suspect it from the proliferation of gluten-free items on supermarket shelves. Yet only one in approximately 133 people - that's 0.75 percent of the population - has celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disorder that causes the body to react negatively to the intake of gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley and their derivatives. [More]
Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Day-to-day chemical exposures linked to earlier menopause

Women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower levels of these chemicals, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

Study finds relationship between menopausal symptoms, bone health in postmenopausal women

The first large prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between menopausal symptoms and bone health in postmenopausal women has found that those who experience moderate to severe hot flashes and night sweats during menopause tend to have lower bone mineral density and higher rates of hip fracture than peers with no menopausal symptoms. [More]
Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center earns Baby-Friendly designation

Loyola University Medical Center has earned the coveted Baby-Friendly designation. This verifies that the hospital has implemented the ten steps to help new mothers successfully breastfeed. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

CUMC researchers identify that OCR stem cells can regenerate bone and cartilage in mice

A stem cell capable of regenerating both bone and cartilage has been identified in bone marrow of mice. The discovery by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center is reported today in the online issue of the journal Cell. [More]
Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

Changes in health limitations, chronic conditions can predict mortgage distress

The mortgage strain of American home ownership can lead to poor health but a new study finds that the inverse may also be true-- changes in health can serve as a predictor to mortgage distress. [More]
Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Potassium salts in plant foods improve bone health

Latest research from the University of Surrey has found that the potassium salts (bicarbonate and citrate) plentiful in fruit and vegetables, play an important part in improving bone health. For the first time, the results also showed that these potassium salts reduce bone resorption, the process by which bone is broken down, therefore increasing their strength. [More]
TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

TERT mutations may make smokers more susceptible to emphysema

Mutations in a gene that helps repair damaged chromosome ends may make smokers — especially female smokers — more susceptible to emphysema, according to results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers. [More]