Osteoporosis News and Research RSS Feed - Osteoporosis News and Research Twitter

Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

Scientists report that mouse with weak bones appears to have strong metabolism

One mouse with weak bones appears to have a strong metabolism, even on a high-fat diet, scientists report. While weaker bones are clearly not a good thing, scientists suspect that, somewhere in the conversation between the genetically engineered mouse's skeleton and the rest of its body, there may be an answer that helps obese individuals avoid some of the worst ravages of this health epidemic. [More]
New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

New therapy for osteoporosis may be in the pipeline

Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI), Florida, have reported a novel therapeutic approach that could promote the formation of new bone cells in people suffering from bone loss. [More]
Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

Recurrent major depression may increase osteoporosis risk in men

A recent study from the University of Eastern Finland in collaboration with Deakin University, Australia, shows that recurrent major depressive disorder (MDD) in men is associated with lower bone density. The use of antidepressants was also associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD), but this association was dependent on the person's weight and site of bone measurement. [More]
New study suggests dental implants may improve quality of life in women with osteoporosis

New study suggests dental implants may improve quality of life in women with osteoporosis

A new study by Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine researchers suggests dental implants may be the best route to take, according to Leena Palomo, associate professor of periodontics and corresponding author of "Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women." [More]
Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Treating obesity with GLP-1 hormone helps prevent loss of bone mass associated with weight loss

Using the intestinal hormone GLP-1 in obesity treatment prevents the loss of bone mass otherwise frequently associated with major weight loss. This is the finding of a new study from the University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre and Glostrup Hospital. According to the researchers behind the study, the results may have a significant bearing on future obesity treatment. [More]
Updated SOGC guidelines include FIBRISTAL as only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids

Updated SOGC guidelines include FIBRISTAL as only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids

The Society for Obstetrics and Gynecology of Canada has issued updated guidelines for the management of uterine fibroids (uterine leiomyomas), which now include the first and only approved medical treatment for uterine fibroids: FIBRISTAL (ulipristal acetate). [More]
Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith announces FDA approval of sNDA for Qudexy XR extended-release capsules

Upsher-Smith Laboratories, Inc. announced that it has received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) for Qudexy XR (topiramate) extended-release capsules for use as initial monotherapy in patients two years of age and older who are experiencing partial-onset seizures (POS) or primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures. [More]
Process of aging could be delayed in human cell lines

Process of aging could be delayed in human cell lines

Can the process of aging be delayed or even reversed? Research led by specially appointed Professor Jun-Ichi Hayashi from the University of Tsukuba in Japan has shown that, in human cell lines at least, it can. They also found that the regulation of two genes involved with the production of glycine, the smallest and simplest amino acid, is partly responsible for some of the characteristics of aging. [More]
Brittle bones does not significantly affect occurrence of bone fractures among older people

Brittle bones does not significantly affect occurrence of bone fractures among older people

Anti-osteoporotic medication is not an effective means for preventing hip fractures among the elderly, concludes a study recently published in the BMJ. According to Professor Teppo Järvinen from the University of Helsinki, who heads the research group, the prevalent assumption that brittle bones cause hip fractures is fundamentally flawed. [More]
Subclinical hyperthyroidism linked to increased fracture risk

Subclinical hyperthyroidism linked to increased fracture risk

In an analysis that included more than 70,000 participants from 13 studies, subclinical hyperthyroidism was associated with an increased risk for hip and other fractures including spine, according to a study in the May 26 issue of JAMA. Subclinical hyperthyroidism is a low serum thyroid-stimulating hormone concentration in a person without clinical symptoms and normal thyroid hormone concentrations on blood tests. [More]
National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

National Jewish Health researcher calls for men to be included in osteoporosis screening guidelines

Most people associate osteoporosis with women. But the truth is, one in four men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a result of this condition. That's more men than will have prostate cancer, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. [More]
Scientists working together to help parents motivate children to increase calcium intake

Scientists working together to help parents motivate children to increase calcium intake

Scientists from 11 land-grant institutions and Brigham Young University are working together to help parents motivate children to boost calcium intake to strengthen bones and prevent bone fractures from occurring later in life. [More]
Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

Global survey finds gap in physicians' understanding on impact of lupus on patients' lives

As many people in the lupus community prepare to come together in support of World Lupus Day (May 10), a global survey shows that systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients have difficulty describing their symptoms to their physicians, which leads to a gap in physicians understanding the full impact the illness has on patients' lives. [More]
Penn State College of Medicine awarded PCORI grant to study exercise program for older adults

Penn State College of Medicine awarded PCORI grant to study exercise program for older adults

Penn State College of Medicine was awarded nearly $14 million in funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to study the effectiveness of a program integrating strength training, balance exercises and walking for older adults who have had a fall-related fracture. [More]
Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

Novel method predicts risk of sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients

A new test has been developed to predict sudden cardiac death in hemodialysis patients in whom such forecasts were previously impossible. The novel method was presented at ICNC 12 by Dr Akiyoshi Hashimoto, a cardiologist at Sapporo Medical University in Japan. The test uses a combination of nuclear medicine, C-reactive protein and electrocardiogram (ECG). [More]
Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

Survey: 52% of acute coronary syndrome patients don't take their prescribed OAP therapy

People with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) who undergo an angioplasty procedure and receive a heart stent are prescribed an oral antiplatelet (OAP) therapy and aspirin to help prevent a heart attack, a blood clot in their heart stent (stent thrombosis), or even death. [More]
Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide's solid dose formulation of teriparatide achieves successful results in pre-clinical study

Glide Technologies, the development company focused on solid dose formulations of therapeutics and vaccines and non-invasive diagnostics, today announced that its novel solid dose formulation of teriparatide (parathyroid hormone) achieved successful results in a pre-clinical proof-of-concept study comparing it with the currently marketed liquid product (Forteo/Forsteo). [More]
Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff scientists make breakthrough asthma discovery

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Epigenetic processes influence children's later ability to learn and cognitive performance

Although it is now widely recognised that a poor start to life has long-term effects on a child's later ability to learn, the mechanisms by which the environment in early life affects later life chances are poorly understood. [More]
Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff scientists identify potential root cause of asthma and highlight new treatment option

Cardiff University scientists have for the first time identified the potential root cause of asthma and an existing drug that offers a new treatment. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement