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Osteoporosis is a progressive metabolic bone disease that causes a decrease in bone density and gives rise to weak, fragile bones that are prone to fracture. Most commonly, these fractures occur in the spine, wrist and hips when a person falls or bumps into something. If such an event triggers a visit to the doctor, a test of the bone mineral density called a DEXA scan may be performed and reveal osteoporosis.

The term osteoporosis refers to the porous (spongy) state of bone that eventually manifests as the bone’s ability to replenish itself declines over time. When individuals reach the age of around 40, the rate of bone breakdown starts to exceed the rate at which it is replaced, creating increasingly larger holes in the bone that make it less dense and more prone to fracture.

Some of the risk factors for osteoporosis such as gender, age and family history for the condition cannot be changed. However, factors such as diet and activity level can be improved to increase bone strength and individuals are advised to exercise regularly, eat a diet rich in vitamin D and calcium, and quit any smoking or drinking habits.

Osteoporosis is currently thought to be affecting more than 200 million people worldwide but is most common among older, post-menopausal women who have reduced levels of estrogen, an important contributor to bone health.
Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Health care resource use and costs of H.P. Acthar® gel for multiple sclerosis relapse

Mallinckrodt plc, a leading global specialty biopharmaceutical company, today announced new retrospective health economic data on H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection; RCI), which may be an option for the management of multiple sclerosis (MS) relapses. [More]
JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

JBMR article highlights controversies in treating high-risk osteoporosis patients

The remarkable progress made over the past 30 years to reduce fractures and dramatically improve the quality of life for millions of osteoporosis patients is rapidly being reversed, say two bone health experts in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research article published online today. [More]
Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Bone Balance Index may help predict bone loss in women during menopause transition

Researchers have developed an index to better predict which women may experience faster bone loss across the menopause transition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. [More]
IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

IOF urges clinicians in Asia to prepare for escalating crisis of osteoporosis among elderly people

The International Osteoporosis Foundation is calling on doctors in the Asia-Pacific region to prepare for an immense rise in the number of elderly people suffering broken bones as a result of osteoporosis. [More]
Fetal BPA exposure leads to harmful change in adult uterine response to estrogens

Fetal BPA exposure leads to harmful change in adult uterine response to estrogens

Low levels of BPA exposure may be considered safe, but new research published online in The FASEB Journal, suggests otherwise. In the report, researchers from Yale show that the genome is permanently altered in the uterus of mice that had been exposed to BPA during their fetal development. [More]
Study examines effectiveness of high-load resistance training in improving older men’s bone strength

Study examines effectiveness of high-load resistance training in improving older men’s bone strength

Big improvements in bone and muscle strength with no injuries is expected to be the outcome of a Griffith University study training men aged over 50 with low bone mass. [More]
Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Complex 36-point therapeutic personalized program can help reverse memory loss in early AD patients

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging. [More]
Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Researchers explore why women have ubiquitous survival advantage than men

Women live longer than men. This simple statement holds a tantalizing riddle that Steven Austad, Ph.D., and Kathleen Fischer, Ph.D., of the University of Alabama at Birmingham explore in a perspective piece published in Cell Metabolism on June 14. [More]
Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

Rehabilitation programmes can help reverse frailty in older COPD patients

One in four patients with COPD referred for exercise rehabilitation are frail, but nevertheless can respond favourably to rehabilitation and their frailty can be reversed, finds a new study led by King's College London and Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust. [More]
New PsA-comorbidity index may help identify patients at risk of hospitalisation and premature death

New PsA-comorbidity index may help identify patients at risk of hospitalisation and premature death

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that a newly developed method of evaluating the impact of different comorbidities in patients with Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) can be used to prospectively identify those PsA patients at greater risk of hospitalisation and premature death. [More]
New paediatric exoskeleton aims to support children with spinal muscular atrophy

New paediatric exoskeleton aims to support children with spinal muscular atrophy

Furthermore, it will also be used in physiotherapy in hospitals to prevent the secondary effects associated with the loss of mobility in this illness. The technology, which has been patented and licensed jointly by CSIC and its technology-based business unit, Marsi Bionics, is currently in the preclinical phase. [More]
One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

One-third of osteoporotic women taking oral bisphosphonates have elevated risk for bone fracture

More than 53 million Americans age 50 and older, primarily women, have osteoporosis or are at high risk for the condition due to low bone density. A recent study of oral bisphosphonates, the most commonly prescribed osteoporosis treatment, found that approximately a third of women prescribed these drugs continue to be at elevated risk for bone fracture, an outcome that may have several origins. [More]
Taking vitamin D with quetiapine can help avoid new-onset diabetes risk

Taking vitamin D with quetiapine can help avoid new-onset diabetes risk

Atypical antipsychotics, though effective for treating disorders like schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and depression, gives patients a heightened risk of developing new-onset diabetes. [More]
Buck researchers identify new, potential drug targets for sporadic PD

Buck researchers identify new, potential drug targets for sporadic PD

Research at the Buck Institute shows the same mechanisms that lead to neuronal cell death in mice genetically fated to develop Parkinson's disease (PD) are involved in the much more common sporadic form of the age-related, neurodegenerative disorder that robs people of the ability to move normally. [More]
Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Premature babies have lower peak bone mass as adults

Among the many important processes that happen during a woman's last few weeks of pregnancy is the transfer of calcium to the growing foetus to boost bone development. [More]
Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Researchers at the Buck Institute have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Publishing in Aging Cell, researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent. [More]
More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older hip fracture patients not aware of having osteoporosis

More than 7 in 10 older adults who suffer hip fractures aren't told they have the bone-weakening disease osteoporosis - despite the fact that hip fractures nearly always signify the presence of this potentially debilitating condition, according to revealing new research by Northwell Health physicians. [More]
UK-wide study reveals AOD prescription rates for women decrease in last 10 years

UK-wide study reveals AOD prescription rates for women decrease in last 10 years

A UK-wide study looking at the prescribing of anti-osteoporotic drugs (AOD) to people aged 50 years or above has found that, since 2006, AOD prescription rates for women have decreased and rates for men have levelled off, despite a growing elderly population and associated fracture risks. [More]
Easy-to-follow care pathway assists health professionals with latest post-reproductive health strategies

Easy-to-follow care pathway assists health professionals with latest post-reproductive health strategies

A new position statement by the European Menopause and Andropause Society published in the journal Maturitas provides a pathway with the latest post-reproductive health strategies, with the aim of optimizing care at an international scale. [More]
Benefits of calcium supplements in preventing broken bones may be cancelled out by increased stroke risk

Benefits of calcium supplements in preventing broken bones may be cancelled out by increased stroke risk

Taking calcium and vitamin D can help prevent broken bones in older women. However, this benefit may be cancelled out by an increased risk of heart attack and stroke. [More]
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