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Commonly known as the "silent killer," ovarian cancer leads to approximately 15,000 deaths each year in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. Approximately 20,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, with the majority in patients diagnosed with late stage disease where the cancer has spread beyond the ovary. The prognosis is poor in these patients, leading to the high mortality from this disease. A diagnostic test is needed that can provide adequate predictive value to stratify patients with a pelvic mass into high risk of invasive ovarian cancer versus those with low risk, as well as a screening test for the diagnosis of early-stage ovarian cancer, which is essential for improving overall survival in patients. Ovarian cancer has up to a 90% cure rate following surgery and/or chemotherapy if detected in stage 1.
Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Rare germ cell tumor creates unique bond between two young women

Morgan Ellison and Madison McDaniel were diagnosed with a rare germ cell tumor of the ovary earlier this year. The two strangers would soon form a unique bond during their treatment in Birmingham, Alabama. [More]
Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

Excess abdominal fat in obese African American women could hide symptoms of ovarian cancer

African American women with ovarian cancer are more likely to die from the disease than are White women and they are also much more likely to be obese. These factors may be linked by the new finding that excess abdominal fat in overweight and obese women could interfere with the detection of early symptoms of ovarian cancer, as presented in a study published in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website until May 28, 2016. [More]
New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

New gene testing method can identify mutations, prioritize variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes

A research team led by an award-winning genomicist at Western University has developed a new method for identifying mutations and prioritizing variants in breast and ovarian cancer genes, which will not only reduce the number of possible variants for doctors to investigate, but also increase the number of patients that are properly diagnosed. [More]
New class of cancer-driver gene may serve as unique therapeutic targets, biomarkers in TNBC

New class of cancer-driver gene may serve as unique therapeutic targets, biomarkers in TNBC

The discovery of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has dramatically changed the understanding of the biology of diseases such as cancer. The human genome contains about 20,000 protein-coding genes - less than 2 percent of the total - but 70 percent of the genome is made into non-gene-encoding RNA. [More]
Ludwig, CRI launch Phase 1/2 trial of combination immunotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer

Ludwig, CRI launch Phase 1/2 trial of combination immunotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer

Ludwig Cancer Research and the Cancer Research Institute have launched a Phase 1/2 clinical trial of combination immunotherapy for advanced ovarian cancer. The international, multicenter trial is led by George Coukos, director of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Lausanne and Brad Monk, director of Gynecologic Oncology at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center. [More]
Study may help identify unborn children at higher risk for birth defects

Study may help identify unborn children at higher risk for birth defects

Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered a novel function performed by the breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1), which regulates DNA repair. Well known for the role it plays in breast and ovarian cancer, this study revealed that the BRCA1 protein actually plays a much broader biological role, particularly in protecting the developing embryo from the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS). [More]
Kevin Rudi Superhero 5K Fun Run to raise money for sarcoma research

Kevin Rudi Superhero 5K Fun Run to raise money for sarcoma research

The second annual Kevin Rudi Superhero 5K Fun Run will start and end by the Memorial Stadium Field House in Las Cruces. Money raised for sarcoma research will benefit The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
SGO acting on ovarian cancer report recommendations

SGO acting on ovarian cancer report recommendations

During the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s 47th Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer today, SGO convened a panel of ovarian cancer experts to discuss the recently released report by the National Academy of Medicine (NAM), [More]
Genetic testing in women with ovarian cancer helps determine prognosis

Genetic testing in women with ovarian cancer helps determine prognosis

A study examining mutations in DNA repair genes in women with advanced ovarian cancer found that the disease remained at bay longer in women with the mutations than without, and that women having cancers with these mutations lived longer. [More]
Targeted therapies suppress T cell activity that could actually help fight tumors

Targeted therapies suppress T cell activity that could actually help fight tumors

In many cases, targeted therapies for cancer are preferred as treatments over chemotherapy and surgery because they attack and kill cancer cells with specific tumor-promoting mutations while sparing healthy, normal cells that do not express these mutations. [More]
Mutated gene GT198 has strong potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer

Mutated gene GT198 has strong potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer

When mutated, a gene known for its ability to repair DNA, appears to instead cause breast cancer, scientists report. [More]
Ovarian serous cancer patients with overexpression of HER4 protein less likely respond to chemotherapy

Ovarian serous cancer patients with overexpression of HER4 protein less likely respond to chemotherapy

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers discovered that patients with ovarian serous cancer and an overexpression of the HER4 protein are less likely to respond to chemotherapy and have a lower rate of survival. [More]
Genomic profiling could help provide targeted therapies for difficult to treat cancer tumors

Genomic profiling could help provide targeted therapies for difficult to treat cancer tumors

Research from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey examining difficult to treat cancer tumors through genomic profiling shows that tumors with alterations in a signaling pathway responsible for cell regulation may respond to targeted therapy regardless of where the tumor originated in the body. [More]
Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Combination drug therapy may stop KRAS-mediated lung adenocarcinoma

Researchers on Mayo Clinic's Florida campus have shut down one of the most common and lethal forms of lung cancer by combining the rheumatoid arthritis drug auranofin with an experimental targeted agent. [More]
Use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy tripled from 2002 to 2012 despite no survival benefit

Use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy tripled from 2002 to 2012 despite no survival benefit

The use of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), the surgical removal of a breast unaffected by cancer as part of the course of treatment for breast cancer, has more than tripled from 2002 to 2012 despite evidence suggesting no survival benefit over breast conservation, according to a new study from Brigham and Women's Hospital published in Annals of Surgery on March 11, 2016. [More]
Clinical review examines benefit of RT in breast cancer patients with BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations

Clinical review examines benefit of RT in breast cancer patients with BRCA1, BRCA2 mutations

In light of conflicting and inconclusive clinical data on the benefit of radiation therapy in cancer patients with the BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation, a clinical review examined the current status of data regarding BRCA1 and BRCA2 deficiency and radiation therapy sensitivity and a potential strategy to intensify the effects of radiation therapy (RT) by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi), the pharmacologic drugs under investigation as monotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer in patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. [More]
IOM report elucidates state of ovarian cancer incidence, treatment and research

IOM report elucidates state of ovarian cancer incidence, treatment and research

Ovarian cancer, one of the deadliest malignancies, is actually a constellation of different cancers that may originate in other organs and should not be treated as a single disease, concludes a new congressionally mandated report on the state of ovarian cancer incidence, treatment and research. The report, published by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, also highlights persistent serious disparities in delivery of care across different groups of women in the U.S., and suggests promising areas for further research. [More]
Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Psychological difficulties of ovarian cancer: an interview with Katherine Taylor

Ovarian cancer affects around 7000 thousand women in the UK every year and very sadly the outcomes are not great. A women dies every 2 hours of ovarian cancer. If I am diagnosed today, I’ve only got a 40% chance of being alive in 5 years’ time. [More]
Mapping family health history could drive patients to more timely screenings

Mapping family health history could drive patients to more timely screenings

Most doctors and nurses review a patient's family history to identify risk factors for heart disease and cancer, often through a paper checklist or brief interview. [More]
Differences in certain type of small protein may shed light on lung cancer risk in different races

Differences in certain type of small protein may shed light on lung cancer risk in different races

Research from an investigator at Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and colleagues from the National Cancer Institute and other facilities, shows differences in a certain type of small protein vary by race and may contribute differently to the development of lung cancer in African Americans and European Americans. [More]
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