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Commonly known as the "silent killer," ovarian cancer leads to approximately 15,000 deaths each year in the United States, according to the American Cancer Society. Approximately 20,000 new cases are diagnosed each year, with the majority in patients diagnosed with late stage disease where the cancer has spread beyond the ovary. The prognosis is poor in these patients, leading to the high mortality from this disease. A diagnostic test is needed that can provide adequate predictive value to stratify patients with a pelvic mass into high risk of invasive ovarian cancer versus those with low risk, as well as a screening test for the diagnosis of early-stage ovarian cancer, which is essential for improving overall survival in patients. Ovarian cancer has up to a 90% cure rate following surgery and/or chemotherapy if detected in stage 1.
UCM scientists design biosensor capable of detecting cancer autoantibodies at early stages

UCM scientists design biosensor capable of detecting cancer autoantibodies at early stages

Before a malignant tumor is developed, the immune system tries to fight against proteins that are altered during their formation, producing certain cancer antibodies. [More]
Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

Landmark study unravels secrets of aggressive prostate cancer

A landmark study, led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute with the involvement of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, has revealed the reason why men with a family history of prostate cancer who also carry the BRCA2 gene fault have a more aggressive form of prostate cancer. [More]
How does the brain control appetite?

How does the brain control appetite?

Energy balance between energy intake and expenditure in our bodies is important for maintaining energy homeostasis to keep our bodies functioning properly. The appetite determines how much we eat, the energy intake, by communication between the brain and body. [More]
Gene testing could help predict ovarian cancer patients' sensitivity to new class of drugs

Gene testing could help predict ovarian cancer patients' sensitivity to new class of drugs

Testing for a gene commonly mutated in ovarian cancers could pick out patients who will respond well to a promising new class of cancer drugs, a major new study reveals. [More]
Sanford study explores protein's role in improving survival of ovarian cancer patients

Sanford study explores protein's role in improving survival of ovarian cancer patients

A Sanford Research lab is studying a protein's role in improving survival in ovarian cancer patients. Findings published in Oncogenesis indicate a higher level of a specific protein correlates with an increased survival rate and decrease in the spreading of cancer cells. [More]
Breast cancer patient finds new hope with potentially revolutionary treatment

Breast cancer patient finds new hope with potentially revolutionary treatment

City of Hope patient Susan Young has had a remarkable response to a potentially revolutionary new treatment, a combination of the p53 cancer vaccine and a drug that blocks a specific cancer-aiding protein. [More]
Simple blood test may help predict ovarian cancer patient’s response to chemotherapy treatment

Simple blood test may help predict ovarian cancer patient’s response to chemotherapy treatment

Scientists might be able to quickly predict how ovarian cancer patients are likely to respond to chemotherapy treatment using a simple blood test, according to a Cancer Research UK-funded study published in PLOS Medicine today (Tuesday). [More]
Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular use of over-the-counter non-steroidal inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of dying in patients diagnosed with Type 1 endometrial cancers, according to a new population-based study led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

FDA awards accelerated approval to new ovarian cancer drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Rubraca (rucaparib) to treat women with a certain type of ovarian cancer. [More]
Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

Scientists discover molecular link between rare childhood genetic disease and major cancer gene

A team of researchers led by a University of Rhode Island scientist has discovered an important molecular link between a rare childhood genetic disease, Fanconi anemia, and a major cancer gene called PTEN. [More]
Type 2 diabetes drug may someday help combat breast and ovarian cancers

Type 2 diabetes drug may someday help combat breast and ovarian cancers

A drug used now to treat Type 2 diabetes may someday help beat breast and ovarian cancers, but not until researchers decode the complex interactions that in some cases help promote tumors, according to Rice University scientists. [More]
NUS study offers new hope for treating aggressive ovarian cancer subtype

NUS study offers new hope for treating aggressive ovarian cancer subtype

A recent discovery by researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore may lead to a new treatment strategy for an aggressive ovarian cancer subtype. [More]
Scientists develop easy-to-use software tool to detect important genetic mutations

Scientists develop easy-to-use software tool to detect important genetic mutations

Scientists have developed an easy-to-use software tool that can detect important genetic mutations that previously needed to be identified by a separate test. [More]
Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Testing for Lynch syndrome: an interview with Kevin Monahan

Lynch syndrome is an inherited condition which causes about 1,100 cases of bowel cancer and 1,000 other cancers annually in the UK. It is caused by a fault in the mismatch repair gene (MMR) which usually works to prevent cancer. [More]
Scientists develop new computer-based method to assess cell communication networks

Scientists develop new computer-based method to assess cell communication networks

A multi-institution academic-industrial partnership of researchers led by Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has developed a new method to broadly assess cell communication networks and identify disease-specific network anomalies. [More]
New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

New treatment with therapeutic short interfering RNA could help thwart cancer

In the fight against cancer, doctors dish out combination-blows of surgery, chemotherapy and other drugs to beat back a merciless foe. Now, scientists have taken early steps toward adding a stinging punch to clinicians' repertoire. [More]
Long-term weight gain may increase risk of obesity-related cancers

Long-term weight gain may increase risk of obesity-related cancers

Substantial weight gain over many years increases the risk of obesity-related cancers in men by 50 per cent and in women by almost 20 per cent, according to new research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute's Cancer Conference in Liverpool, today (Monday). [More]
Combination treatment can reduce tumor's resistance to chemotherapy in ovarian cancer

Combination treatment can reduce tumor's resistance to chemotherapy in ovarian cancer

Treating ovarian cancer with platinum-based chemotherapy drugs such as cisplatin is initially very effective, with about four out of five patients responding favorably. However, most of these patients quickly become resistant to chemotherapy and may not respond as well to this standard treatment for the disease. [More]
Researchers identify protein linked to negative effects of senescence

Researchers identify protein linked to negative effects of senescence

Cellular senescence is a state in which normal healthy cells do not have the ability to divide. Senescence can occur when cancer-causing genes are activated in normal cells or when chemotherapy is used on cancer cells. [More]
Scientists discover how MEK inhibitor boosts antitumor activity and slows cancer progression

Scientists discover how MEK inhibitor boosts antitumor activity and slows cancer progression

Understanding the effects of certain targeted therapies on antitumor immunity is necessary to design combined interventions for more effective cancer treatment. [More]
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