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Oxidative Stress is a condition in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal. Antioxidant levels are usually measured in blood plasma.
Genes that increase longevity may not increase healthy lifespan

Genes that increase longevity may not increase healthy lifespan

A study of long-lived mutant C. elegans by scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School shows that the genetically altered worms spend a greater portion of their life in a frail state and exhibit less activity as they age then typical nematodes. [More]
Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

Daily use of Pycnogenol may help improve overall cognitive function

New research delivers exciting news for those seeking natural ways to boost memory and mental performance. A study recently published in the Journal of Neurosurgical Sciences shows daily use of Pycnogenol (pic-noj-en-all), a natural plant extract from French maritime pine tree bark, may help improve attention span, memory, decision-making – including executive-level performance – and overall cognitive function. [More]
Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

Iron accumulation in human tissues may contribute to the aging process

It's been known for decades that some metals, including iron, accumulate in human tissues during aging and that toxic levels of iron have been linked to neurologic diseases, such as Parkinson's. Common belief has held that iron accumulation happens as a result of the aging process. [More]
Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

Research findings may lead to new treatment for hypothyroidism

An international research team led by physician-scientists at Rush University Medical Center have gained new insights into hypothyroidism - a condition affecting about 10 million people in the U.S. - that may lead to new treatment protocols for the disease, particularly among the approximately 15 percent of patients for whom standard treatments are less effective. [More]
Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Exposure to nanoparticles can play major role in development of cardiovascular diseases

Nanoparticles, extremely tiny particles measured in billionths of a meter, are increasingly everywhere, and especially in biomedical products. Their toxicity has been researched in general terms, but now a team of Israeli scientists has for the first time found that exposure nanoparticles (NPs) of silicon dioxide (SiO2) can play a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases when the NP cross tissue and cellular barriers and also find their way into the circulatory system. [More]
Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Brazilian researchers find that nutrition education may help prevent reoccurrence of breast cancer

Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of death among women worldwide, and five-year survival rates are just 58.4% in Brazil, lower than in many other regions. In a new study, however, researchers from Federal University of Santa Catarina provided Brazilian breast cancer patients with nutrition education and found it could benefit patients and may help prevent reoccurrence of the cancer. [More]
Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

High blood pressure affects more than 70 million Americans and is a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and other renal and cardiovascular diseases. Two University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers are examining the role of intrinsic antioxidant pathways in mitigating hypertension. [More]
Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life. [More]
Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

A simple supplement could be a safe and cost-effective way of reducing heart disease in individuals born with a low birth weight, suggests research from the University of Cambridge. The study, carried out in rats, also raises the possibility of developing a blood test to indicate how much damage there is in the aortas of these individuals. [More]
Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, and Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging treatment approaches may reduce the burden of anemia associated with blood disorders by enhancing production of healthy red blood cells, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Fenofibrate benefits in diabetic retinopathy mediated through PPARα

Fenofibrate benefits in diabetic retinopathy mediated through PPARα

Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α exerts protective effects on retinal pericytes, shows research that explains why fenofibrate is protective against diabetic retinopathy. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims--and are now searching for drugs to block it. [More]
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing diagnostic tests for cancer and other conditions, today announced that data from its pilot lung cancer study will be presented at the Science for Business BioWin Day 2014, being held November 26, 2014 in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. [More]
Study warns that trans fats may be bad for the memory

Study warns that trans fats may be bad for the memory

A high intake of dietary trans fatty acids may have an adverse effect on memory, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. [More]
Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin, a mycotoxin that increases oxidative stress, can complement the activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukaemia by overcoming innate resistance mediated by secreted bone marrow stromal cytokines and growth factors, researchers report. [More]