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Oxidative Stress is a condition in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal. Antioxidant levels are usually measured in blood plasma.
Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

Researchers examining new antioxidant-based therapeutic approaches to hypertension

High blood pressure affects more than 70 million Americans and is a major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and other renal and cardiovascular diseases. Two University of Houston College of Pharmacy researchers are examining the role of intrinsic antioxidant pathways in mitigating hypertension. [More]
Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

Umbilical cord clamping influences resistance to oxidative stress in newborns

A study conducted by University of Granada scientists (from the Physiology, Obstetrics and Gynaecology Departments) and from the San Cecilio Clinical Hospital (Granada) has demonstrated that delaying the cutting of the umbilical cord in newborns by two minutes leads to a better development of the baby during the first days of life. [More]
Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

Simple supplement could reduce heart disease in individuals born with low birth weight

A simple supplement could be a safe and cost-effective way of reducing heart disease in individuals born with a low birth weight, suggests research from the University of Cambridge. The study, carried out in rats, also raises the possibility of developing a blood test to indicate how much damage there is in the aortas of these individuals. [More]
Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Genetic variations may contribute to treatment-related cognitive problems in children with ALL

Common variations in four genes related to brain inflammation or cells' response to damage from oxidation may contribute to the problems with memory, learning and other cognitive functions seen in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to a study led by researchers from Boston Children's Hospital, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, and Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. [More]
Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Vitamin C may reduce exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and respiratory symptoms

Physical activity increases oxidative stress, and therefore, as an antioxidant vitamin C might have particularly evident effects on people who are participating in vigorous exercise. In several studies, vitamin C administration attenuated the increases in oxidative stress markers caused by exercise. Furthermore, vitamin C is involved in the metabolism of histamine, prostaglandins, and cysteinyl leukotrienes, all of which appear to be mediators in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. [More]
Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging strategies to boost healthy RBCs may reduce burden of anemia linked to blood disorders

Emerging treatment approaches may reduce the burden of anemia associated with blood disorders by enhancing production of healthy red blood cells, according to data presented today at the 56th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition. [More]
Fenofibrate benefits in diabetic retinopathy mediated through PPARα

Fenofibrate benefits in diabetic retinopathy mediated through PPARα

Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor α exerts protective effects on retinal pericytes, shows research that explains why fenofibrate is protective against diabetic retinopathy. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers identify mechanism linked to brain damage

Researchers have discovered a mechanism linked to the brain damage often suffered by stroke victims--and are now searching for drugs to block it. [More]
Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Study reveals how one type of DNA damage may lead to several human diseases

Using a new imaging technique, National Institutes of Health researchers have found that the biological machinery that builds DNA can insert molecules into the DNA strand that are damaged as a result of environmental exposures. These damaged molecules trigger cell death that produces some human diseases, according to the researchers. [More]
Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

Study shows effectiveness of VolitionRx’s NuQ test in detecting lung cancer in blood and sputum

VolitionRx Limited, a life sciences company focused on developing diagnostic tests for cancer and other conditions, today announced that data from its pilot lung cancer study will be presented at the Science for Business BioWin Day 2014, being held November 26, 2014 in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. [More]
Study warns that trans fats may be bad for the memory

Study warns that trans fats may be bad for the memory

A high intake of dietary trans fatty acids may have an adverse effect on memory, according to new research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014. [More]
Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking key brain receptor cell could neutralize biological consequences of Alzheimer's

Blocking a key receptor in brain cells that is used by oxygen free radicals could play a major role in neutralizing the biological consequences of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University. [More]
Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

Study shows how phthalates linked with complications of pregnancy

In recent years, scientists have linked chemicals known as phthalates with complications of pregnancy and fetal development. [More]

Chaetocin synergistic with TKIs against CML cells

Chaetocin, a mycotoxin that increases oxidative stress, can complement the activity of tyrosine kinase inhibitors in chronic myeloid leukaemia by overcoming innate resistance mediated by secreted bone marrow stromal cytokines and growth factors, researchers report. [More]
University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

University at Buffalo researchers receive $500,000 grant to study IED-induced vision loss

It's well known that battlefield explosions can cause hearing loss, but veterans may be surprised to learn that their vision may also suffer — sometimes weeks or months after combat exposure. [More]
Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

Sulindac drug can protect against oxidative damage due to AMD

While oxygen is essential to our planet's life force and the way we function and stay healthy, high concentrations referred to as oxidative stress may very well be the cause of more than 70 widely-spread diseases such as cancer, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and eye diseases including macular degeneration. [More]
Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies. [More]
Joslin researcher identifies molecular pathway that causes neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies

Joslin researcher identifies molecular pathway that causes neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies

Mary R. Loeken, Ph.D., Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at Joslin Diabetes Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, has discovered a molecular pathway responsible for neural tube defects in diabetic pregnancies. Her latest research findings in this pathway were published in the October issue of Diabetes. [More]
IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

IU School of Medicine researchers identify new protein that can control diabetes

Indiana University School of Medicine researchers have identified a small protein with a big role in lowering plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity. [More]
UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

Asthma may be more harmful than was previously thought, according to UCLA researchers who found that genetic damage is present in circulating, or peripheral, blood. Doctors previously thought that the genetic damage it caused was limited to the lungs. [More]