Oxidative Stress News and Research RSS Feed - Oxidative Stress News and Research

Oxidative Stress is a condition in which antioxidant levels are lower than normal. Antioxidant levels are usually measured in blood plasma.
Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

Alpha lipoic acid can stimulate telomerase with positive effects in mouse model of atherosclerosis

In human cells, shortened telomeres, the protective caps at the ends of chromosomes, are both a sign of aging and contribute to it. Scientists at Emory University School of Medicine have found that the dietary supplement alpha lipoic acid (ALA) can stimulate telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, with positive effects in a mouse model of atherosclerosis. [More]
Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

Sigma 1 receptor appears to play vital role in supporting the retina

A receptor that is already a target for treating neurodegenerative disease also appears to play a key role in supporting the retina, scientists report. [More]
Study reveals new gene that plays crucial role in ASD

Study reveals new gene that plays crucial role in ASD

A study carried out by the Laboratoire Neurobiologie des Interactions Cellulaires et Neurophysiopathologie (CNRS/Aix-Marseille Université), in collaboration with clinicians from Marseilles Public Hospitals (AP-HM) and scientists from the Salk Institute in San Diego (US), has revealed a new gene that plays a crucial role during early development in humans and whose under-expression may induce certain autistic traits. [More]
Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers demonstrate direct connection between NOX proteins and liver fibrosis

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have demonstrated a direct connection between two signaling proteins and liver fibrosis, a scarring process underlying chronic liver disease, the 12th leading cause of death in the United States. [More]
New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

New study estimates link between coffee consumption habits and incidence of mild cognitive impairment

A new study by researchers at the University of Bari Aldo Moro, Bari, Italy, Geriatric Unit & Laboratory of Gerontology and Geriatrics, IRCCS "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Foggia, Italy, and Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Roma, Italy, estimates the association between change or constant habits in coffee consumption and the incidence of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), evaluating 1,445 individuals recruited from 5,632 subjects, aged 65-84 year old, from the Italian Longitudinal Study on Aging (ILSA), a population-based sample from eight Italian municipalities with a 3.5-year median follow-up. [More]
New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

New special issue addresses hottest areas of research in cancer and metabolism

The latest Special Issue in ecancermedicalscience collects four original articles from experts in cancer and metabolism, addressing the hottest areas of research in this rapidly developing field. [More]
Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

Metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from wireless devices linked to many health risks

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, a recent study suggests. [More]
New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

New UTMB study reveals mechanism central to pollen-induced allergies

A new study from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston has uncovered a mechanism that is central to becoming allergic to ragweed pollen and developing allergic asthma or seasonal nasal allergies. The findings are currently available online in the American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. [More]
Aging may trigger adaptive response to offset effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels

Aging may trigger adaptive response to offset effects of oxidative stress on blood vessels

Although the causes of many age-related diseases remain unknown, oxidative stress is thought to be the main culprit. Oxidative stress has been linked to cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases including diabetes, hypertension and age-related cancers. However, researchers at the University of Missouri recently found that aging actually offered significant protection against oxidative stress. [More]
RepliCel obtains two important approvals to conduct RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial

RepliCel obtains two important approvals to conduct RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial

RepliCel Life Sciences Inc., a clinical stage regenerative medicine company focused on the development of autologous cell therapies, today announced it has received two important approvals required to conduct its RCS-01 phase 1 human clinical trial. [More]
Two antioxidant supplements effective in treating mice with skin-picking disorder

Two antioxidant supplements effective in treating mice with skin-picking disorder

Two antioxidant supplements are effective in treating skin-picking disorder in mice, according to a study led by a Stanford University School of Medicine researcher. [More]
Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

Wayne State researchers explore effects of Tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil in ESRD patients

End-stage renal disease (ERSD) is the last stage of chronic kidney disease where the kidneys function at under 10 to 15 percent of their normal capacity. At this stage, kidneys cannot effectively remove waste or excess fluid from the blood system, and dialysis or a kidney transplant is necessary to live. [More]
Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Extra set of guanines in DNA may function like 'spare' to help prevent cancers from developing

Carrying around a spare tire is a good thing -- you never know when you'll get a flat. Turns out we're all carrying around "spare tires" in our genomes, too. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers report that an extra set of guanines (or "G"s) in our DNA may function just like a "spare" to help prevent many cancers from developing. [More]
UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

UCSD researchers report that statins make women aggressive, but men calmer

Statins are a hugely popular drug class used to manage blood cholesterol levels and reduce the risk of heart disease. Previous studies had raised questions about adverse behavioral changes with statins, such as irritability or violence, but findings with statins have been inconsistent. In the first randomized trial to look at statin effects on behavior, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that aggressive behavior typically declined among men placed on statins (compared to placebo), but typically increased among women placed on statins. [More]
Fruit flies helping FAU researchers to discover novel genes responsible for neuroprotection

Fruit flies helping FAU researchers to discover novel genes responsible for neuroprotection

They're pesky and annoying when they get into your fruit, but Drosophila melanogaster, more affectionately known as the "fruit fly," are helping researchers at Florida Atlantic University to discover novel genes that are responsible for neuroprotection. [More]
Laurent reports positive topline results from LAU-7b Phase 1b trial in adult CF patients

Laurent reports positive topline results from LAU-7b Phase 1b trial in adult CF patients

Laurent Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced today positive topline results from a Phase 1b clinical trial with LAU-7b in adult CF patients. LAU-7b is a novel oral formulation of fenretinide, a synthetic retinoid investigated for its lipid modulating properties and potential to address the aberrant inflammatory response in CF. [More]
A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people avoid social situations due to uncontrolled dandruff, reveals anonymous survey

A third of people admitted to avoiding social situations as a result of emotional distress caused by their dandruff, according to new survey results released today by the British Skin Foundation(BSF) in conjunction with the world’s no. 1 anti-dandruff shampoo, Head & Shoulders (H&S). [More]
Findings point to new therapy against prostate and other cancers

Findings point to new therapy against prostate and other cancers

Scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found that a drug candidate with anticancer potential can be activated by one of the body's natural responses to cellular stress. Once activated, the agent can kill prostate cancer cells. [More]
Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress

Neurodegenerative Lafora disease usually becomes apparent through seizures during adolescence and puberty and occurs as a consequence of defects in glycogen metabolism and in the cellular mechanisms that are responsible for its disposal. Researchers at the University of Valencia have led a study in which they propose that Lafora rare disease could be aggravated by oxidative stress. [More]
Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Heavy metallic elements influence AMD progression

Researchers report associations between age-related macular degeneration and five heavy metallic elements, in findings that highlight the detrimental effects of pollution but the possible benefits of essential elements supplementation. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement