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Prevalence of celiac disease on the rise among children with irritable bowel syndrome

There appears to be an increased prevalence of celiac disease among children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). [More]

California Orthopaedic Medical Clinic offers comprehensive surgical solution for spinal stenosis

Like any back surgery, spinal stenosis treatment can be a significant and emotionally taxing moment in a person's life – which is why it is essential to ensure that it is effective the first time by trusting treatment to experts like Dr. Seyed M. Rezaian. [More]
Doctors still make good money

Doctors still make good money

An annual survey shows that doctors, on average, still make at least three times the annual median household income. Media outlets also describe other trends, including the return of house calls, often as part of hospital palliative care programs, the use of scribes to help with digital records, rushed doctors' visits and a study finding that free drug samples influence doctors' prescribing practices. [More]
MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX acquires Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates

MEDNAX, Inc., today announced the acquisition of Fredericksburg Anesthesia Associates, Inc., a private practice physician group based in Fredericksburg, Va. The practice will become part of MEDNAX's American Anesthesiology division and is the third Virginia-based anesthesia practice to join the division. [More]
First Edition: April 21, 2014

First Edition: April 21, 2014

Today's early morning highlights from the major news organizations, including a GAO report on how the Obama administration raised money from outside groups to promote the health law. [More]

Viewpoints: The number keeps rising; new fears about census fracus; patients lose as insurers 'play games'

Obamacare's critics have had a bad week. On Thursday, President Obama announced that 8 million people have enrolled in new health insurance plans through the Affordable Care Act's marketplaces, and a significant portion of them are young Americans. [More]
Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

Scientists lay groundwork for understanding immune responses in Lyme disease patients

A team of scientists led by Johns Hopkins and Stanford University researchers has laid the groundwork for understanding how variations in immune responses to Lyme disease can contribute to the many different outcomes of this bacterial infection seen in individual patients. A report on the work appears online April 16 in PLOS One. [More]
Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Children get codeine in U.S. emergency rooms, despite risks: Study

Despite its potentially harmful effects in children, codeine continues to be prescribed in U.S. emergency rooms, according to new research from UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital San Francisco. [More]
Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

Genmab/GSK receive FDA sBLA approval for Arzerra in combination with chlorambucil for treatment of CLL

GlaxoSmithKline plc and Genmab A/S announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a Supplemental Biologic License Application (sBLA) for the use of Arzerra® (ofatumumab), a CD20-directed cytolytic monoclonal antibody, in combination with chlorambucil for the treatment of previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) for whom fludarabine-based therapy is considered inappropriate. [More]

Researchers identify key genes linked to pain perception

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, April 26 to May 3, 2014. [More]
Sprifermin reduces cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

Sprifermin reduces cartilage loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial cartilage thickness loss was reduced in sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18)-treated knees compared to placebo-treated knees, with effects being significant in the lateral femorotibial compartment but not in the central femorotibial compartment. [More]
Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

Viewpoints: Obamacare still has more challenges; GOP needs to help make law work; census change is not Obama's decision

The first open enrollment period under the Affordable Care Act ended this week with roughly 7.5 million people obtaining policies through the new state insurance exchanges, including more than 1.3 million at Covered California. [More]

Study shows sprifermin reduces cartilage thickness loss in patients with knee osteoarthritis

In a new study in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, at 12 months, total femorotibial cartilage thickness loss was reduced in sprifermin (recombinant human fibroblast growth factor 18)-treated knees compared to placebo-treated knees, with effects being significant in the lateral femorotibial compartment but not in the central femorotibial compartment. [More]

XBiotech announces results from Phase I/II oncology study

XBiotech is announcing that results from its Phase I/II oncology study conducted at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, TX were published today in Lancet Oncology. The featured article describes the outcome in 52 advanced cancer patients treated with Xilonix™, XBiotech's novel, non-cytotoxic, anti-tumor therapy. [More]
New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

New research may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other disease-causing flaviviruses. [More]

Research provides fresh insight into structure of sodium channels

Sodium channels are implicated in many serious conditions such as heart disease, epilepsy and pain, making them an important potential target for drug therapies. Unfortunately, there is still much scientists do not know about the molecules. [More]

Docs who treat patients with severe LAM face agonizing treatment decision

​Doctors who treat patients with a severe and progressive respiratory disease called lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) can face an agonizing treatment decision. [More]
Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma signs agreement with Lebanon based company, ATL

Targeted Medical Pharma, today announced the completion of an agreement between Analytical Testing Laboratories (ATL), a Lebanon based company that specializes in drug testing services and inborn errors of metabolism, for the exclusive distribution of the company's amino acid based products to physicians and pharmacies throughout the Middle East. [More]

State highlights: Mass. can't ban painkiller, judge rules; Kan. and health care compact bill

A selection of health policy stories from Massachusetts, Kansas, Florida, Michigan, Connecticut, Maryland, Arizona, Hawaii, Missouri and Georgia. [More]

Throw away your old medicines safely

Americans spend nearly $1,100 per person on prescription and over-the-counter medications every year, and much of it is left in cabinets, drawers, or forgotten. [More]