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Exact magnitude of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal mortality underreported, WHO reveals

Exact magnitude of stillbirths, maternal and neonatal mortality underreported, WHO reveals

The day of birth is potentially the most dangerous time for mothers and babies. Every year, worldwide, 303 000 women die during pregnancy and childbirth, 2.7 million babies die during the first 28 days of life and 2.6 million babies are stillborn. [More]
Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

Migraine patients differ from healthy people by increased vascular reactivity

A group of scientists from several Russian universities and medical centers made progress in explaining the nature of one of the most ancient neurologic diseases – migraine. The study was conducted within a larger project to develop a device capable of remotely and effectively diagnosing this disease. [More]
RACP releases new Choosing Wisely Australia recommendations on appropriate use of medicines for older adults

RACP releases new Choosing Wisely Australia recommendations on appropriate use of medicines for older adults

The latest lists developed by specialties from the Royal Australasian College of Physicians as part of the Choosing Wisely Australia initiative deliver a strong message on appropriate use of medicines for older Australians. [More]
Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

Long-term brain-machine interface use could lead to recovery in paraplegic patients

During the 2014 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony, a young Brazilian man, paralyzed from the chest down, delivered the opening kickoff. He used a brain-machine interface, allowing him to control the movements of a lower-limb robotic exoskeleton. [More]
Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Opioid naive individuals at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after surgery, research shows

Researchers from the University Health Network's Department of Anesthesia and Pain Management and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences have determined that patients who have not had an opioid prescription within a year prior to their procedure are at low risk of developing persistent opioid use after major surgery. [More]
Commonly used anti-inflammatory drug shows potential to treat Alzheimer's disease

Commonly used anti-inflammatory drug shows potential to treat Alzheimer's disease

A research project has shown that an experimental model of Alzheimer's disease can be successfully treated with a commonly used anti-inflammatory drug. [More]
Drug approved for treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy shows no added benefit in post-menopausal women

Drug approved for treatment of vulvovaginal atrophy shows no added benefit in post-menopausal women

Ospemifene (tradename: Senshio) is approved for the treatment of moderate to severe symptomatic vulvovaginal atrophy (VVA) in post-menopausal women who are not candidates for local vaginal oestrogen therapy. [More]
Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers find causal link between senescent cells and age-related osteoarthritis

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have reported a causal link between senescent cells — cells that accumulate with age and contribute to frailty and disease — and osteoarthritis in mice. [More]
New study shows frozen embryo transfer safer, more successful in women with PCOS

New study shows frozen embryo transfer safer, more successful in women with PCOS

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) who receive frozen embryos during in vitro fertilization have safer and more successful pregnancies than those who get fresh embryos, according to the results of a recent collaboration between Penn State College of Medicine and Chinese researchers. [More]
New research could lead to improved treatment for depression

New research could lead to improved treatment for depression

SCIENTISTS at the University of Huddersfield led by Dr Patrick McHugh have embarked on a project that could lead to a more effective treatment for depression. [More]
Brain-stimulation method provides significant reductions in phantom limb pain

Brain-stimulation method provides significant reductions in phantom limb pain

As many as 25,000 people a year worldwide lose limbs from land mine blasts, and a new study, published in The Journal of Pain, shows that transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) administered to the scalp can stimulate the brain and provide significant reductions in phantom limb pain. [More]
Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

Distraction techniques can help calm children from shot-related anxiety during flu season

A typical visit to the pediatrician when it is time for a child to get a shot can include tears, tantrums and might not seem worth the trouble. [More]
Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Study finds oral immunotherapy safe, effective at suppressing peanut allergy in preschool children

Nearly 80 percent of peanut-allergic preschool children successfully incorporated peanut-containing foods into their diets after receiving peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT), a clinical trial has found. [More]
Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

Cardinals appear as super-suppressors protecting Atlanta residents from West Nile Virus

A bird species that does a poor job spreading West Nile virus (WNV) but is particularly likely to get mosquito bites may explain why human infections with the disease are relatively uncommon in Atlanta, Georgia—despite evidence of high rates of virus circulating in the local bird population, according to a new study published online today in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
Researchers use TMS–EEG device to examine the brain activity of people in NREM sleep

Researchers use TMS–EEG device to examine the brain activity of people in NREM sleep

Researchers from Aalto University and the University of Wisconsin utilised a TMS-EEG device, which combines transcranial magnetic stimulation and EEG, to examine how the brain activity of people in the restful non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep is affected by whether they dream or do not dream. [More]
Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

Study finds positive link between planned home births and breast feeding

A new study by academics in Trinity College Dublin has found that there is a strong positive relationship between planned birth at home and breast feeding: breastfeeding was twice as likely after planned home births compared to hospital births. [More]
Study finds racial-ethnic disparities in emergency department opioid prescription for pain-related conditions

Study finds racial-ethnic disparities in emergency department opioid prescription for pain-related conditions

Dr. Astha Singhal, Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research at Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, published a study that found a racial disparity in opioid prescriptions for emergency department visits for non-definitive pain-related conditions. [More]
Researchers identify biophysical markers that may help improve treatments for sickle cell disease

Researchers identify biophysical markers that may help improve treatments for sickle cell disease

An interdisciplinary, international group of researchers has found new biophysical markers that could help improve the understanding of treatments for sickle cell disease, a step toward developing better methods for treating the inherited blood disorder that affects an estimated 80,000 to 100,000 Americans each year. [More]
Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain could be significantly reduced by targeting brain cells

Neuropathic pain - which affects more than 1 million Americans - could be reduced or even eliminated by targeting brain cells that are supposed to provide immunity but, in some instances, do the opposite, causing chronic pain that could last a lifetime. [More]
Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons during dental treatment could help reduce anxiety and distress in children

Watching cartoons through video glasses during dental treatment could help lessen children's anxiety and distress as well as reducing disruptive behaviour, according to a randomized controlled trial published in Acta Odontologia Scandinavica. [More]
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