Palliative Care News and Research RSS Feed - Palliative Care News and Research

Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.
Trastuzumab drug improves long-term survival of patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer

Trastuzumab drug improves long-term survival of patients with HER-2 positive breast cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center physician-researcher Charles E. Geyer, Jr., M.D., was the National Protocol Officer for one component of a large national study involving two National Cancer Institute-supported clinical trials that demonstrated that trastuzumab significantly improves the long-term survival of HER-2 positive breast cancer patients. [More]
WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

WHO reviews health services in Ebola-affected countries

On 10-11 December 2014, Ministers of Health and Finance of Ebola-affected countries, international organizations and development partners assembled for a high-level meeting on how to strengthen systems of health in Ebola-affected countries and agreed on what needs to be done to rebuild and strengthen essential health services in these countries. [More]

Hospice of the Western Reserve, Hospice of Dayton partner to provide quality care for all Ohioans

Ohio's two largest hospice care providers - Hospice of the Western Reserve and Hospice of Dayton - have announced a collaborative initiative to ensure delivery of the highest quality of care for all Ohioans. The partnership will focus on creating best practice standards for hospice and palliative care, proactively sharing quality data, benchmarking performance to continuously improve care delivery and creating the most skilled workforce. [More]
UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

UTHealth opens Trauma and Grief Center for Youth

Children who are having difficulty processing trauma or loss can now turn to the Trauma and Grief Center for Youth at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. [More]
Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

Use of HF-WBI for patients with early-stage breast cancer increases 17.4%, study finds

The use of hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer increased 17.4 percent from 2004 to 2011, and patients are more likely to receive HF-WBI compared to conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation (CF-WBI) when they are treated at an academic center or live ≥50 miles away from a cancer center, according to a study published in the December 1, 2014 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (Red Journal), the official scientific journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology. [More]
New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

New study compares characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes and community settings

As hospice for nursing home patients grows dramatically, a new study from the Regenstrief Institute and the Indiana University Center for Aging Research compares the characteristics of hospice patients in nursing homes with hospice patients living in the community. The study also provides details on how hospice patients move in and out of these two settings. [More]
Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Scientists seek to improve stem cell transplant outcomes using DNA sequencing, mathematical modeling

Is the human immune system similar to the weather, a seemingly random yet dynamical system that can be modeled based on past conditions to predict future states? Scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center's award-winning Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) Program believe it is, and they recently published several studies that support the possibility of using next-generation DNA sequencing and mathematical modeling to not only understand the variability observed in clinical outcomes of stem cell transplantation, but also to provide a theoretical framework to make transplantation a possibility for more patients who do not have a related donor. [More]
New WHO guidance provides cervical cancer control and prevention approach

New WHO guidance provides cervical cancer control and prevention approach

New guidance from WHO aims to help countries better prevent and control cervical cancer. The disease is one of the world's deadliest - but most easily preventable - forms of cancer for women, responsible for more than 270 000 deaths annually, 85% of which occur in developing countries. [More]
Researchers show that iPS cells can be used to edit genetic mutations that cause DMD

Researchers show that iPS cells can be used to edit genetic mutations that cause DMD

Researchers at the Center for iPS Cell Research and Application, Kyoto University, show that induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be used to correct genetic mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). [More]
A goodwill ambassador of palliative care

A goodwill ambassador of palliative care

Leanne Schoberl could have put anyone's picture on the home screen of her cell phone. "She loved American Idol winner Scotty McCreery. She envisioned marrying him one day," says Leanne's father John Schoberl. [More]
Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

Unique immunochemotherapy approach to treating pancreatic cancer

VCU Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine researchers discovered a unique approach to treating pancreatic cancer that may be potentially safe and effective. The treatment method involves immunochemotherapy - a combination of chemotherapy and immunotherapy, which uses the patient's own immune system to help fight against disease. [More]
Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Hospice care lowers hospitalization, ICU admissions and invasive procedures for Medicare patients

Medicare patients with poor­ prognosis cancers who received hospice care had significantly lower rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and invasive procedures at the end of life, along with significantly lower health care expenditures during the last year of life, according to a study in the November 12 issue of JAMA. [More]
Top 5 things to talk about in end-of-life discussions with hospitalized patients, their families

Top 5 things to talk about in end-of-life discussions with hospitalized patients, their families

A study led by a McMaster University researcher has identified the top five things health care teams should discuss with hospitalized patients and their families at the end of life, but the research also found gaps between what patients would like and the care they receive. [More]
VCU Massey Cancer Center researchers develop tool for measuring cancer health literacy

VCU Massey Cancer Center researchers develop tool for measuring cancer health literacy

Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) Massey Cancer Center researchers have developed the first and only tool that can accurately measure cancer health literacy (CHL) and quickly identify patients with limited CHL. This tool has the potential to improve communication and understanding between physicians and patients, which, in turn, could lead to better clinical outcomes. [More]
Hospice of the Western Reserve honors more than 2,000 veterans in 2014

Hospice of the Western Reserve honors more than 2,000 veterans in 2014

Americans across the country will observe Veterans Day on November 11, a special day to salute the men and women who have bravely served our country. [More]
PP&AR: 1 out of 4 older Americans experience unwanted medical treatment

PP&AR: 1 out of 4 older Americans experience unwanted medical treatment

Nearly one out of four older Americans say that either they or a family member have experienced excessive or unwanted medical treatment, according to the latest issue of The Gerontological Society of America's Public Policy & Aging Report, which goes on to show that Americans strongly support holding doctors accountable when they fail to honor patients' end-of-life health care wishes. [More]
Four ACS members named recipients of ACS/Pfizer Surgical Humanitarian and Volunteerism Awards

Four ACS members named recipients of ACS/Pfizer Surgical Humanitarian and Volunteerism Awards

Earlier this evening, four members of the American College of Surgeons were named recipients of the 2014 ACS/Pfizer Surgical Humanitarian and Volunteerism Awards in recognition of their selfless efforts as volunteer surgeons who provide care to medically underserved patients, domestically and abroad. [More]
Duke researchers develop new collaborative cancer care model for patients

Duke researchers develop new collaborative cancer care model for patients

Doctors at Duke University Hospital have developed a new collaborative model in cancer care that reduced the rates at which patients were sent to intensive care or readmitted to the hospital after discharge. [More]

National nursing organizations collaborate to transform care for patients with serious illness

Three national nursing organizations today announced a collaborative effort to transform the care and culture of serious illness in the United States. [More]
Despite rise in use of hospice care, hospital-based services increase for ovarian cancer patients

Despite rise in use of hospice care, hospital-based services increase for ovarian cancer patients

There have been widespread efforts to improve the quality of life of terminally ill patients. As more patients choose to spend their final days and weeks in hospice care rather than a hospital, the hope is the use of intensive and costly hospital services would decline. [More]