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Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psychosocial and spiritual.
Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

Novel combination therapy slows cancer growth in patients with advanced solid tumors

A phase 1 clinical trial testing a novel combination therapy developed by scientists at VCU Massey Cancer Center slowed the growth of cancer in the majority of trial participants, which were patients with advanced solid tumors. [More]
Researchers explore how African-Americans use spirituality to ease burden of chronic illnesses

Researchers explore how African-Americans use spirituality to ease burden of chronic illnesses

Spirituality plays a central role in many aspects of African-American culture, and University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Nursing postdoctoral scholar Deborah Ejem, Ph.D., will explore how significant a factor it is in the relationships among patients with chronic illnesses and their caregivers and clinicians. [More]
In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

In-hospital program improves community mobility, posthospitalization function in older adults

Decreased mobility during hospitalization for older adults is associated with increased risk of death, nursing home admission and functional decline. University of Alabama at Birmingham investigators found that patients who participated in a mobility program were less likely to experience a decline in mobility when compared to the usual care provided during hospilization. [More]
How can we defeat drug resistance? An interview with Dr Grania Brigden

How can we defeat drug resistance? An interview with Dr Grania Brigden

The O’Neill report is a wide ranging report recognising anti-microbial resistance (AMR) as a global problem with major public health and economic significance. [More]
High-quality palliative care can help offset severe anxiety symptoms in terminal cancer patients

High-quality palliative care can help offset severe anxiety symptoms in terminal cancer patients

A new study out of Chang Gung University School of Nursing in Taiwan suggests that people with cancer experience severe anxiety toward end of life, not solely due to proximity to death, but rather to factors related to psychosocial issues and disease burden. [More]
Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Study finds positive support from all racial/ethnic groups for physician-assisted death

Physician-assisted death was supported by a majority of California and Hawaii residents, regardless of their ethnicity, who responded to an online survey, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Study shows aggressive end-of-life care for young cancer patients may be less effective

Study shows aggressive end-of-life care for young cancer patients may be less effective

In the last month of their lives, younger cancer patients continued to be hospitalized and receive other aggressive treatment at high rates, a University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center-led study found. [More]
Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Researchers at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered something simple and inexpensive to reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy--exercise. [More]
Researchers explore communication needs, preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer

Researchers explore communication needs, preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer

The way in which bad news is communicated to patients at the end of their lives influences their quality of care. Researchers at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work are examining the perceptions and preferences of older Latinos with advanced cancer--one of the fastest growing segments in the aging population--about receiving news on their diagnosis or prognosis. [More]
Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Advanced cancer patients lack palliative, hospice care

Medical societies, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, recommend that patients with advanced cancer receive palliative care soon after diagnosis and receive hospice care for at least the last three days of their life. Yet major gaps persist between these recommendations and real-life practice, a new study shows. [More]
Study explores whether way of expressing condolences should be standardised among oncologists

Study explores whether way of expressing condolences should be standardised among oncologists

The results of a new survey published in ecancermedicalscience indicate that a majority of oncology professionals believe that writing condolence letters to the families of deceased patients is an important component of cancer palliative care. [More]
Comprehensive outlook of COPD care in the U.S.

Comprehensive outlook of COPD care in the U.S.

Fifteen million: That's the number of adults in the United States affected by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. [More]
Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

Guide to advance directives: an interview with Dr Lisa Price

An advance directive is a very specific legal document that details the medical treatments you want, and, importantly, don’t want, if you’re unable to communicate with a physician. This may happen as a result of a critical illness that could make you confused or unable to speak. [More]
Physicians failing to talk to stroke patients about end-of-life treatment preferences

Physicians failing to talk to stroke patients about end-of-life treatment preferences

US research suggests that physician-patient discussion about limitations on life-sustaining interventions following ischaemic stroke is low, poorly documented and often left too late. [More]
Cancer patients who choose home-based palliative care tend to live longer

Cancer patients who choose home-based palliative care tend to live longer

A large study from Japan found that cancer patients who died at home tended to live longer than those who died in hospitals. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings suggest that oncologists should not hesitate to refer patients for home-based palliative care simply because less medical treatment may be provided. [More]
Study gives insight into reasons behind hospital deaths in older people

Study gives insight into reasons behind hospital deaths in older people

Despite the rates of hospital deaths in England declining, nearly two-thirds of people aged 85 and over, and more than half of people aged 95 and over still die in hospital, new research has found. [More]
Restrictions to opioid prescription block their use for safe, effective pain relief

Restrictions to opioid prescription block their use for safe, effective pain relief

Opioids are very effective for treating some types of pain, such as cancer pain and postoperative pain, but not for other kinds of pain like chronic low back pain. An increase in the number of opioid-related deaths among addicts has led to the current movement to restrict opioid prescribing by state and federal authorities. [More]
New reference guide can help HIV care providers treat chronic pain

New reference guide can help HIV care providers treat chronic pain

Recent studies suggest many individuals with HIV have chronic pain. Estimates range from 39 percent all the way to 85 percent. Chronic pain is an important comorbid condition in individuals with HIV, as it is common and causes substantial disability. [More]
Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Penn study calls on physicians to avoid over-prescribing opioids for surgical patients

Physicians are prescribing more opioid painkillers than ever before to patients undergoing common surgeries, according to new research from the department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Newly developed computer models can simulate stem cell transplant recovery

Newly developed computer models can simulate stem cell transplant recovery

Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University have developed computer models that can simulate the recovery of the immune system in patients undergoing stem cell transplants. [More]
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