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The pancreas is a gland organ in the digestive and endocrine system of vertebrates. It is both an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, and somatostatin, as well as an exocrine gland, secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes that pass to the small intestine. These enzymes help in the further breakdown of the carbohydrates, protein, and fat in the chyme.
Study points to novel way to treat diabetes in some patients

Study points to novel way to treat diabetes in some patients

Blocking the hormone that raises sugar levels in the blood could increase insulin levels while keeping blood sugar levels down. [More]
Transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events in Type 1 diabetes patients

Transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events in Type 1 diabetes patients

Northwestern Medicine researchers are co-investigators in a breakthrough clinical trial that found transplanted human islets prevent hypoglycemic events and provide excellent glycemic control for patients with Type 1 diabetes with severe hypoglycemia. [More]
Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

Low-carbohydrate diet helps reduce growth of glioblastoma tumor cells in mouse models

University of Florida Health researchers have slowed a notoriously aggressive type of brain tumor in mouse models by using a low-carbohydrate diet. [More]
Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Newly developed implantable device can deliver chemotherapy drugs directly to pancreatic tumors

Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States, in part because it is very difficult for chemotherapy drugs to reach the pancreas, which is located deep within the abdomen. [More]
Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

Phenotypic personalized medicine can identify a person's optimal drug, dose combinations

For decades, doctors and scientists have predicted that personalized medicine — tailoring drug doses and combinations to people's specific diseases and body chemistry — would be the future of health care. [More]
WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

WHO marks annual World Health Day, calls for global action on diabetes

The number of people living with diabetes has almost quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million adults, with most living in developing countries. Factors driving this dramatic rise include overweight and obesity, WHO announced ahead of World Health Day. [More]
Immune cell with 'Superman' power could lead to novel therapies for type 1 diabetes

Immune cell with 'Superman' power could lead to novel therapies for type 1 diabetes

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals a previously unknown type of immune cell. The discovery opens new avenues in the effort to develop novel therapies for autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes. [More]
Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Liraglutide drug makes highly desirable foods less appealing to people

Understanding the motivations that drive humans to eat is an important consideration in the development of weight loss therapies. Now a study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center helps explain how the diabetes and weight loss drug liraglutide acts on brain receptors to make enticing foods seems less desirable. [More]
Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

Oral Salmonella-based vaccine could prevent Type 1 diabetes

A combined vaccine therapy including live Salmonella is a safe and effective way to prevent diabetes in mice and may point to future human therapies, a new study finds. The results will be on Sunday, April 3, at ENDO 2016, the annual meeting of the Endocrine Society, in Boston. [More]
New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New promising therapy may improve curative potential of islet transplant for Type 1 diabetes

New research suggests pretreating cells with a peptide hormone may improve the success rate of pancreatic islet cell transplants, a procedure that holds great promise for curing Type 1 diabetes. The results will be presented Saturday, April 2, at the Endocrine Society's annual meeting, ENDO 2016, in Boston. [More]
European researchers aim to spare people with type 1 diabetes from lifelong insulin therapy

European researchers aim to spare people with type 1 diabetes from lifelong insulin therapy

More and more children in Europe and the USA are suffering from diabetes. A Group of European Researchers has now joined forces under the leadership of the Gothe University Frankfurt. They are searching for a new method in order to spare people with Diabetes type 1 from lifelong insulin therapy. [More]
BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, is often diagnosed at a late stage, when curative treatment is no longer possible. A team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has now identified and validated an accurate 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer from non-malignant tissue. [More]
Findings could help explain origin of type 2 diabetes in children of obese mothers

Findings could help explain origin of type 2 diabetes in children of obese mothers

A new study led by researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles reports that the presence of leptin - a hormone secreted by fat cells that is critical to maintaining energy balance in the body -- inhibits the prenatal development of neuronal connections between the brain and pancreas. The findings could help explain the origin of type 2 diabetes, particularly in children of obese mothers. [More]
Neurons in hypothalamus help maintain blood glucose levels, study finds

Neurons in hypothalamus help maintain blood glucose levels, study finds

To learn what different cells do, scientists switch them on and off and observe what the effects are. There are many methods that do this, but they all have problems: too invasive, or too slow, or not precise enough. Now, a new method to control the activity of neurons in mice, devised by scientists at Rockefeller University and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, avoids these downfalls by using magnetic forces to remotely control the flow of ions into specifically targeted cells. [More]
SLU researchers discover compound that disrupts fibrotic process

SLU researchers discover compound that disrupts fibrotic process

Saint Louis University researchers have found that a type of compound that disrupts the process that causes fibrosis (scarring) in the lungs and liver also shows promise in preventing and treating fibrosis in yet another organ, the pancreas. The research was conducted in an animal model. [More]
New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

New research links antibiotic use before age 2 to childhood obesity

While early antibiotic use has been associated with a number of rare long-term health consequences, new research links antibiotics to one of the most important and growing public health problems worldwide -- obesity. [More]
Halozyme Therapeutics doses first patient in Halo-301 | Pancreatic study

Halozyme Therapeutics doses first patient in Halo-301 | Pancreatic study

Halozyme Therapeutics, Inc., a biotechnology company developing novel oncology and drug-delivery therapies, today announced the first patient has been dosed in its Halo-301 | Pancreatic study, a Phase 3 clinical trial in previously untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer patients. [More]
Scientists explore new strategies to prevent onset of type 1 diabetes

Scientists explore new strategies to prevent onset of type 1 diabetes

Type 1 diabetes affects 30,000 individuals throughout Germany and is the most common metabolic disease in children and adolescents. To halt the ever-increasing incidence, the young investigator group "Immunological Tolerance in Type 1 Diabetes" at the Institute of Diabetes Research directed by Prof. Dr. Anette-Gabriele Ziegler is exploring new strategies to prevent the onset of the disease. [More]
Researchers devise synthetic patch filled with insulin-producing beta cells to control blood sugar levels

Researchers devise synthetic patch filled with insulin-producing beta cells to control blood sugar levels

For decades, researchers have tried to duplicate the function of beta cells, the tiny insulin-producing entities that don't work properly in patients with diabetes. Insulin injections provide painful and often imperfect substitutes. Transplants of normal beta cells carry the risk of rejection or side effects from immunosuppressive therapies. [More]

Gallbladder removal surgeries now becomes safer with new imaging procedure

UCLA researchers have discovered an optimal way to image the bile ducts during gallbladder removal surgeries using a tested and safe dye and a real-time near-infrared florescence laparoscopic camera, a finding that will make the procedure much safer for the hundreds of thousands of people who undergo the procedure each year. [More]
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