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Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach and close to the duodenum—the first part of the small intestine. The pancreas secretes digestive juices, or enzymes, into the duodenum through a tube called the pancreatic duct. Pancreatic enzymes join with bile—a liquid produced in the liver and stored in the gallbladder—to digest food. The pancreas also releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These hormones help the body regulate the glucose it takes from food for energy.

Normally, digestive enzymes secreted by the pancreas do not become active until they reach the small intestine. But when the pancreas is inflamed, the enzymes inside it attack and damage the tissues that produce them.

Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is serious and can lead to complications. In severe cases, bleeding, infection, and permanent tissue damage may occur.
Research reveals opposing role for SNAP23 protein in endocrine and exocrine pancreas

Research reveals opposing role for SNAP23 protein in endocrine and exocrine pancreas

Movement of secretory molecules, such as hormones and digestive enzymes, out of the cell is known as exocytosis. This process is guided by SNARE proteins, which help the fusion of secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. [More]
Specific milk protein may help strengthen the body's disease-fighting power, research reveals

Specific milk protein may help strengthen the body's disease-fighting power, research reveals

According to an innovative, new investigation published in Nutrition Journal, cow's milk containing only A2 protein has been shown to increase an essential antioxidant that may help strengthen the body's disease-fighting power. [More]
Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Research shows CRAC channel inhibitors decrease lesion size, brain hemorrhage, and neurological deficits in TBI model

Researchers from the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and UCSF, and CalciMedica, Inc., are presenting a poster at the 46th annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego describing the use of calcium release-activated calcium (CRAC) channel inhibitors in traumatic brain injury (TBI). [More]
Single gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency reduces severity and frequency of pancreatitis

Single gene therapy for lipoprotein lipase deficiency reduces severity and frequency of pancreatitis

Over a 6-year period, patients with the genetic disease lipoprotein lipase deficiency (LPLD) who received a single gene therapy treatment of alipogene tiparvovec had a marked reduction in the severity and frequency of pancreatitis. [More]
Mild to moderate rise in blood fats increases risk of developing acute pancreatitis

Mild to moderate rise in blood fats increases risk of developing acute pancreatitis

New research from the University of Copenhagen shows that mild to moderate levels of blood fats equals an increased risk developing acute pancreatitis. It is far more serious than we previously believed it to be, according to the professor behind the study. [More]
New review looks at complexity of fracture epidemiology in diabetes

New review looks at complexity of fracture epidemiology in diabetes

Due to the ageing of populations as well as increasing obesity and adverse lifestyle factors, type 2 diabetes (T2D) is reaching epidemic proportions in many parts of the world. [More]
TUM scientists shed new light on metastases in the liver at early stage of pancreatic cancer

TUM scientists shed new light on metastases in the liver at early stage of pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive type of cancer. Frequently, metastases already start to grow in other organs, particularly often in the liver, before the original tumor was even detected. [More]
TUM scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for liver metastases at early stage

TUM scientists discover molecular mechanism responsible for liver metastases at early stage

Pancreatic cancer is an exceptionally aggressive type of cancer. Frequently, metastases already start to grow in other organs, particularly often in the liver, before the original tumor was even detected. [More]
Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Gene therapy for LPLD patients linked to lower frequency and severity of pancreatitis

Up to 6 years after receiving a single treatment with the gene therapy product lipoprotein lipase (LPL), patients with the debilitating genetic disease LPL deficiency (LPLD) had about 50% fewer episodes of pancreatitis than before receiving the treatment. [More]
Loyola specialists cure patient’s acute pancreatitis

Loyola specialists cure patient’s acute pancreatitis

Larry Jacob got the call every parent fears. His daughter was sick, away at college and needed help. Mr. Jacob left his home in the Chicago suburbs and was driving to Western Illinois University when he suddenly doubled over in pain. [More]
First accurate simulation reveals how virus shape changes when invading host cell

First accurate simulation reveals how virus shape changes when invading host cell

For the first time, scientists know what happens to a virus' shape when it invades a host cell, thanks to an experiment by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. [More]
New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

New study may help develop effective medication for severe pain

The nerve cells that transmit pain signals in the body are called nociceptors. When activated they release pro-inflammatory neuropeptides. In order to recognise harmful external influences, nociceptors are equipped with a wide range of receptors. [More]
New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

New AAV 3.0 program to create next-generation viral vectors for better treatment of inherited diseases

The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has launched a new program, called AAV 3.0, to create new viral vectors to find quicker and better treatments for an array of diseases. James M. Wilson, MD, PhD, a professor of Medicine and director of the Orphan Disease Center, will lead an interdisciplinary team of over 30 scientists to create this new technology platform with support provided by the University of Pennsylvania Health System. [More]
Researchers explore use of miR-192 as clinical marker for pancreatic cancer

Researchers explore use of miR-192 as clinical marker for pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer is regarded as the cancer type with the lowest survival rates. Fewer than seven in 100 patients survive the first five years after diagnosis. Clinicians attribute this devastating prognosis to two circumstances: Pancreatic cancers often do not cause any signs or symptoms and by the time they are detected they have already reached a very advanced stage in most cases. [More]
Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

Duke scientists discover new small-molecule drugs to treat chronic pain

A research team at Duke University has discovered a potential new class of small-molecule drugs that simultaneously block two sought-after targets in the treatment of pain. [More]
Chronic alcohol exposure could negatively impact pancreas' ability to absorb vitamin C

Chronic alcohol exposure could negatively impact pancreas' ability to absorb vitamin C

Chronic exposure to alcohol interferes with the pancreas' ability to absorb vitamin C, potentially predisposing the body to pancreatitis and other pancreatic diseases, a new study in the American Journal of Physiology—Cell Physiology reports. [More]
CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

CMGH study offers insight into future interventions for Crohn's disease, chronic pancreatitis

Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology is committed to publishing impactful digestive biology research covering a broad spectrum of themes in GI, hepatology and pancreatology. We wanted to share two new CMGH articles, which both offer important insight into future interventions for chronic conditions. [More]
Study identifies risk factors for asparaginase-induced pancreatitis in ALL patients

Study identifies risk factors for asparaginase-induced pancreatitis in ALL patients

Researchers have identified a rare genetic variation associated with a dramatically increased risk of severe acute pancreatitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients treated with the chemotherapy agent asparaginase. St. Jude Children's Research Hospital led the study, which appears today in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Newly identified molecular pathway could lead to new treatments for reflux, incontinence disorders

Researchers at UMass Medical School have identified a new molecular pathway critical for maintaining the smooth muscle tone that allows the passage of materials through the digestive system. [More]
BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

BIDMC investigators identify precise 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer

Pancreatic cancer, the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States, is often diagnosed at a late stage, when curative treatment is no longer possible. A team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has now identified and validated an accurate 5-gene classifier for discriminating early pancreatic cancer from non-malignant tissue. [More]
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