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Viewpoints: Sebelius withstood attacks, but wasn't 'warrior' for law; Burwell offers GOP chance to focus on law's problems

Viewpoints: Sebelius withstood attacks, but wasn't 'warrior' for law; Burwell offers GOP chance to focus on law's problems

Kathleen Sebelius was known for her patience and cool under savage attack by Republicans, who treated her as a stand-in for the health law. She sat through hearings calmly reciting talking points while they fumed and fulminated for their audience. But that turned out to be one of her biggest liabilities ... What the health law needed in its first years was a cheerful, populist warrior who could laugh at the truly ridiculous distortions and lies Republicans invented about it, and roar back with the truth. Instead, she came across as a mild technocrat. She never emerged from the defensive crouch she assumed after the law's calamitous debut (David Firestone, 4/11). [More]
Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on genes of African American children

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on genes of African American children

Stressful upbringings can leave imprints on the genes of children as young as age 9, according to a study led by Princeton University and Pennsylvania State University researchers. Such chronic stress during youth leads to physiological weathering similar to aging. [More]
High-quality early childhood development programs can help prevent onset of adult chronic disease

High-quality early childhood development programs can help prevent onset of adult chronic disease

High-quality early childhood development programs with health care and nutritional components can help prevent or delay the onset of adult chronic disease, according to a new study by Nobel laureate economist James Heckman and researchers at the University of Chicago, University College London and the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute at the University of North Carolina. [More]
Anxiety relief in children: an interview with Dr. Golda Ginsburg, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center

Anxiety relief in children: an interview with Dr. Golda Ginsburg, Johns Hopkins Children’s Center

Anxiety is the most common psychiatric disorder among youth. Prevalence rates hover around 10%, although the actual percent varies depending on the specific anxiety disorder, sample, method of assessment, etc. [More]

Viewpoints: Romneycare and cutting workers; Fla.'s surprising ruling on malpractice reform

Health reform in Massachusetts in 2006 did not cause many workers to have their work hours cut, but that is no comfort for those workers nationwide who will begin to experience this side effect of the federal Affordable Care Act (Casey B. Mulligan, 3/19). [More]
Nine fellows selected to receive Dennis Weatherstone Predoctoral Fellowship for next two years

Nine fellows selected to receive Dennis Weatherstone Predoctoral Fellowship for next two years

​Autism Speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization, today announced the sixth class of The Dennis Weatherstone Predoctoral Fellows funded by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. [More]
Four MAXIMUS centers recognized as Certified Centers of Excellence

Four MAXIMUS centers recognized as Certified Centers of Excellence

MAXIMUS, a leading provider of government services worldwide, announced today that four of its customer contact centers have been recognized as "Certified Centers of Excellence" by BenchmarkPortal. [More]
Fathers who returned after military service have difficulty connecting with young children

Fathers who returned after military service have difficulty connecting with young children

Fathers who returned after military service report having difficulty connecting with young children who sometimes don't remember them, according to a study released this week. [More]

Gender differences in parenting, household labor persist among physician-researchers: Study

A new study finds gender differences in parenting and household labor persist among a group of highly motivated physician-researchers in the early stages of their career. [More]
Researchers examine how breastfed children perform better in school

Researchers examine how breastfed children perform better in school

Loads of studies over the years have shown that children who were breastfed score higher on IQ tests and perform better in school, but the reason why remained unclear. [More]
Pregnant women with bipolar disorder more frequently have mental health

Pregnant women with bipolar disorder more frequently have mental health

Pregnant and postpartum women with bipolar disorder more frequently have significant mental health and early mothering challenges than other perinatal women undergoing psychiatric treatment, according to a study in the Journal of Affective Disorders. [More]
Researchers encourage parents to create nurturing, healthy home environment and lifestyle for children

Researchers encourage parents to create nurturing, healthy home environment and lifestyle for children

Remember that slim kid in school - the one with the cook-from-scratch mom? He's likely one of the fittest dudes at your high school reunion according to new research from Cornell University, published online in the journal PLOS ONE. [More]

ACOG’s consensus statement on preventing first-time cesareans

Today's release of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' (ACOG) consensus statement on preventing first-time cesareans is an important step in closing gaps between evidence and the day-to-day care that women receive in pregnancy and labor. [More]

MAXIMUS Foundation distributes grants to 87 local non-profit organizations

MAXIMUS, a leading provider of government services worldwide, announced today that the MAXIMUS Foundation has distributed approximately $206,000 in grants to 87 local non-profit organizations as part of its most recent grant cycle. [More]

Parenting affects performance of African American boys during preschool-to-kindergarten transition

A new study from UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) has found that parenting affects the academic and social performance of African American boys as they move from preschool to kindergarten. [More]

Children grow up in dangerous neighborhoods exhibit more aggressive behavior

Children around the world who grow up in dangerous neighborhoods exhibit more aggressive behavior, says a new Duke University-led study that is the first to examine the topic across a wide range of countries. [More]
Norris Cotton Cancer Center research estimates impact of R rating for movie smoking

Norris Cotton Cancer Center research estimates impact of R rating for movie smoking

The connection between smoking in films and its influence on adolescent behavior is well established by research and its impact was listed today in consumer materials accompanying the Surgeon General's Report: The Health Consequences of Smoking: 50 Years of Progress [More]

SPSP 2014 to feature symposia on parenting and happiness, social impacts on health

The Society for Personality and Social Psychology annual conference in Austin, TX, from Feb. 13-15, will feature 80 symposia and more than 2,000 posters on new research in a range of topics - the link between parenting and happiness, social impacts on health, the environment's effects on creativity, factors in the academic gender gap, and more. Join 3,500 behavioral scientists in sunny Austin! [More]

Researchers find 5 programs to help parents and children at risk levels behavior problems

All parents want what's best for their children. But not every parent knows how to provide their child with the tools to be successful, or how to help them avoid the biggest adolescent behavior problems: substance use, delinquency, school dropout, pregnancy and violence. [More]

Parenting deteriorates when families face different risk factors at once, study finds

New findings from a long-running study of nearly 1300 rural children by UNC's Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute reveal that parenting deteriorates when families face a number of risk factors at once. As a result, children's intellectual, emotional, and social development suffers. [More]