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Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
Scientists reveal role of lysosomal vesicles in spread of Parkinson's disease

Scientists reveal role of lysosomal vesicles in spread of Parkinson's disease

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur have demonstrated the role of lysosomal vesicles in transporting α-synuclein aggregates, responsible for Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases, between neurons. [More]
Researchers receive $800,000 grant to reconnect neural communication between parts of the brain

Researchers receive $800,000 grant to reconnect neural communication between parts of the brain

Researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus and the University of Colorado Boulder have won a $800,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to try and reconnect neural communication between parts of the brain where it has been severed. [More]
Research shines more light on role of proteins in maintaining synaptic transmission

Research shines more light on role of proteins in maintaining synaptic transmission

Synapses are the power junctions that allow living creatures to function. Popularly associated with learning and memory, they play a more fundamental role in our existence by regulating everything from breathing, sleeping and waking and other bodily functions. [More]
Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Scientists examine how neural responses change over time in patients with Parkinson's disease

Neuroscientists peered into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease and two similar conditions to see how their neural responses changed over time. [More]
MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

MGH investigators discover key molecules essential for sensing proteasome dysfunction

Maintaining appropriate levels of proteins within cells largely relies on a cellular component called the proteasome, which degrades unneeded or defective proteins to recycle the components for the eventual assembly of new proteins. [More]
IRB Barcelona scientists rediscover utility of disordered proteins as therapeutic targets

IRB Barcelona scientists rediscover utility of disordered proteins as therapeutic targets

Prostate cancer, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's...these three diseases are associated with proteins that share a common feature, namely disordered regions that have no apparent rigid three-dimensional structure. [More]
Common gaming camera could be effective in evaluating walking difficulties of MS patients

Common gaming camera could be effective in evaluating walking difficulties of MS patients

A commonly used device found in living rooms around the world could be a cheap and effective means of evaluating the walking difficulties of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. [More]
New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

New, non-invasive way to monitor progression of Parkinson's disease may help improve treatment

A new, non-invasive way to track the progression of Parkinson's disease could help evaluate experimental treatments to slow or stop the disease's progression. [More]
Combining virtual reality and treadmill training could help reduce risk of falls in older adults

Combining virtual reality and treadmill training could help reduce risk of falls in older adults

Combining virtual reality and treadmill training helps prevent falls in older adults better than treadmill training alone, according to a new randomised controlled trial published in The Lancet. [More]
Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

Drugs designed to target nervous system could control inflammation in the gut, study shows

There's a reason it's called a gut feeling. The brain and the gut are connected by intricate neural networks that signal hunger and satiety, love and fear, even safety and danger. These networks employ myriad chemical signals that include dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter most famous for its role in reward and addiction. [More]
Researchers develop new strategy to convert fibroblasts directly into neuronal cells

Researchers develop new strategy to convert fibroblasts directly into neuronal cells

Researchers have used CRISPR -- a revolutionary new genetic engineering technique -- to convert cells isolated from mouse connective tissue directly into neuronal cells. [More]
Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Early treatment of multiple sclerosis may offer long-lasting effect on disease activity

Starting medication for multiple sclerosis (MS) in people who show the beginning signs of the disease is associated with prolonging the time before the disease is definitively diagnosed, according to a long-term study published in the August 10, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New article discusses how imbalances in gut microbiome may be linked to neurological disorders

New article discusses how imbalances in gut microbiome may be linked to neurological disorders

A growing body of scientific and medical evidence continues to shed light on the complex interaction between metabolic pathways affected by microrganisms living in the human gut and gene expression, immune function, and inflammation that can contribute to a range of cognitive, psychiatric, and neurodegenerative disorders. [More]
New laboratory model replicates early phase of Parkinson's before onset of motor symptoms

New laboratory model replicates early phase of Parkinson's before onset of motor symptoms

They're two of the biggest mysteries in Parkinson's disease research--where does the disease start? And how can it be stopped early in the process? Now, a new laboratory model of Parkinson's is giving scientists an inside look at what happens in the brain years before motor symptoms appear. [More]
Novel therapeutic strategy could target multiple aspects of Alzheimer's disease

Novel therapeutic strategy could target multiple aspects of Alzheimer's disease

Therapeutic strategies targeting Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related molecule β-amyloid (Aβ), Tau protein and BACE enzyme have been recently explored. However the therapeutic efficacy for a single target is not ideal. [More]
New review finds link between sleep disorders and stroke risk

New review finds link between sleep disorders and stroke risk

There is growing evidence that sleep disorders like insomnia and sleep apnea are related to stroke risk and recovery from stroke, according to a recent literature review. [More]
New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers today unveiled results from a new blood test to help identify which patients are at an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Inosine treatment can help restore motor control after cortical injury

Inosine treatment can help restore motor control after cortical injury

Brain tissue can die as the result of stroke, traumatic brain injury, or neurodegenerative disease. When the affected area includes the motor cortex, impairment of the fine motor control of the hand can result. [More]
Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

Penn's ADCC receives $8.8 million grant to continue research on treatment for AD and related dementias

The University of Pennsylvania's Alzheimer's Disease Core Center has been awarded an estimated $8.8 million over five years from the National Institute on Aging to continue its mission of investigating mechanisms, diagnostics, treatments and strategies for Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and related dementias including Parkinson's disease (PD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), Lewy Body dementia (LBD) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). [More]
Iron-containing catalysts can alter amino acids to help develop new drug candidates

Iron-containing catalysts can alter amino acids to help develop new drug candidates

For medicinal chemists, making tweaks to peptide structures is key to developing new drug candidates. Now, researchers have demonstrated that two iron-containing small-molecule catalysts can help turn certain types of amino acids -- the building blocks of peptides and proteins -- into an array of potential new forms, even when part of a larger peptide, while preserving a crucial aspect of their chemistry: chirality, or "handedness." [More]
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