Parkinson's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Parkinson's Disease News and Research Twitter

Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
People with MS have much greater risk of dying younger compared to people without MS

People with MS have much greater risk of dying younger compared to people without MS

New research suggests people with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have double the risk of dying early compared to people without MS, with those younger than 59 at a three times higher risk. The study is published in the May 27, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

Scorpion venom could kill cancer cells

When the toxin invades channels in the cells with this disease produces cellular damage until killing them. [More]
UF research opens door to better diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease

UF research opens door to better diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease

University of Florida researchers have identified a biomarker that shows the progression of Parkinson's disease in the brain, opening the door to better diagnosis and treatment of the degenerative disease. [More]
Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

Depression may be a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, say Umeå University researchers

People with depression may be more likely to develop Parkinson's disease, according to a large study by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden, published on 20 May, 2015, in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

New findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases

Researchers at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine (LCSB), of the University of Luxembourg, have, under Dr. Manuel Buttini, successfully measured metabolic profiles, or the metabolomes, of different brain regions, and their findings could help better understand neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

Researchers explore how low-level electrical stimulation reduces inflammation

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, the research arm of the North Shore-LIJ Health System, and SetPoint Medical Inc., a biomedical technology company, today released the results of research on the therapeutic potential of vagus nerve stimulation. In a paper published by Bioelectronic Medicine, Kevin J. Tracey, MD, and his colleagues at the Feinstein Institute, explore how low-level electrical stimulation interacts with the body's nerves to reduce inflammation, a fundamental goal of bioelectronic medicine. [More]
Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali launched to discover, develop effective medicines for neurodegenerative diseases

Denali Therapeutics Inc., a new biotechnology company focused on developing effective therapies for neurodegenerative diseases, announced today that it has launched with an initial investment commitment of $217 million. [More]
New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work challenges long-held beliefs about link between hippocampus and improved memory function

New work by the Douglas Mental Health University Institute (CIUSSS de l'Ouest-de-l'île-de-MontréalI) computational neuroscientist Mallar Chakravarty, PhD, and in collaboration with researchers at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health challenges in a thrilling way the long-held belief that a larger hippocampus is directly linked to improved memory function. [More]
Miniature, fiber-optic microscope allows deep brain exploration

Miniature, fiber-optic microscope allows deep brain exploration

A team of neuroscientists and bioengineers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have created a miniature, fiber-optic microscope designed to peer deeply inside a living brain. [More]
Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

Discovery paves way for developing treatments for people addicted to cocaine, amphetamines

In a major advance in the field of neuropsychiatry, researchers in the Vollum Institute at Oregon Health & Science University have illuminated how cocaine and amphetamines disrupt the normal functioning of the dopamine transporter in the brain. [More]
New method may help determine potential indicator of stress, neurological disorders

New method may help determine potential indicator of stress, neurological disorders

A research collaboration between the universities of Oslo and Aarhus has resulted in the development of a new method with diagnostic potential. The new method that combines phase extraction with an enzymatic reaction may eventually be used for an improved and faster screening analysis of isatin as a potential indicator of stress and neurological disorders. [More]
MJFF announces acquisition of parkin research tools from Imago Pharmaceuticals

MJFF announces acquisition of parkin research tools from Imago Pharmaceuticals

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research announces the acquisition of a library of research tools around the parkin protein from Imago Pharmaceuticals. The Foundation believes these tools — cell lines, plasmids, compounds and more — will accelerate biological study and drug development against this promising disease-modification target. [More]
GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

GTEx findings reveal how genomic variants can affect gene activity and disease susceptibility

Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project have created a new and much-anticipated data resource to help establish how differences in an individual's genomic make-up can affect gene activity and contribute to disease. [More]
NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

NIH-sponsored Phase 1 clinical trial evaluates novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine

A novel investigational West Nile virus vaccine discovered and developed by scientists at the Oregon National Primate Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University is being evaluated in an NIH-sponsored Phase 1, first-in-human, clinical trial at Duke University. Although several early-stage West Nile virus vaccine clinical trials have been completed to date, no human vaccine has been approved for commercial use. [More]
UT Southwestern's new operating suite integrates surgical and endovascular techniques in one space

UT Southwestern's new operating suite integrates surgical and endovascular techniques in one space

UT Southwestern Medical Center has established a Hybrid Cerebrovascular Operating Suite at Zale Lipshy University Hospital that will combine surgical innovations with advanced imaging capabilities for surgical cases related to stroke and brain aneurysms. [More]
Parkinson's disease drug delays onset of age-related macular degeneration

Parkinson's disease drug delays onset of age-related macular degeneration

L-DOPA, a routine drug taken by patients suffering from Parkinson's disease, has been found to delay the onset of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The research is being presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology this week in Denver, Colo. [More]
UNC researchers use exosomes to deliver potent Parkinson's treatment directly to the brain

UNC researchers use exosomes to deliver potent Parkinson's treatment directly to the brain

Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have used exosomes -- tiny bubbles of protein and fat produced naturally by cells -- to bypass the body's defenses and deliver a potent antioxidant directly to the brain to treat Parkinson's disease. [More]
New study finds that challenging work tasks may have significant effect on brain health

New study finds that challenging work tasks may have significant effect on brain health

Professionals whose jobs require more speaking, developing strategies, conflict resolution and managerial tasks may experience better protection against memory and thinking decline in old age than their co-workers, according to a new study published in the April 29, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Study opens door for new therapeutic approaches to treating patients with melanoma

Weill Cornell Medical College researchers have shown for the first time that a gene previously implicated in blood vessel formation during embryonic development and tumor growth also induces immune suppression during tumor development. [More]
Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch honored with 2015 March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology

Rudolf Jaenisch, MD, who laid the groundwork for the development and use of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells - stem cells derived directly from adult tissue -- to potentially treat and cure a variety of human diseases, has received the 20th anniversary March of Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. [More]
Advertisement