Parkinson's Disease News and Research RSS Feed - Parkinson's Disease News and Research Twitter

Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Bacterial biofilms play role in development of systemic lupus erythematosus

Lupus, multiple sclerosis, and type-1 diabetes are among more than a score of diseases in which the immune system attacks the body it was designed to defend. But just why the immune system begins its misdirected assault has remained a mystery. [More]
Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Findings reveal new pathway to develop effective treatments and therapies for asthma, allergy

Investigators have discovered the precise molecular steps that enable immune cells implicated in certain forms of asthma and allergy to develop and survive in the body. The findings from Weill Cornell Medical College reveal a new pathway that scientists could use to develop more effective treatments and therapies for the chronic lung disorder. [More]
New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

New research suggests that Bcl-Rambo protein can protect against heart failure

A protein dubbed 'Bcl-Rambo' can protect against heart failure, suggests new research from King's College London and funded by the British Heart Foundation. [More]
Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

Study: Genes may not trigger heart disease in people suffering from migraine with aura

A new study suggests that genes may not be to blame for the increased risk of heart disease some studies have shown in people with migraine, especially those with migraine with aura. The research is published during Headache/Migraine Awareness Month in the inaugural issue of the journal Neurology Genetics, an open access, or free to the public, online-only, peer-reviewed journal from the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

UTHealth researchers discover new light-activated proteins that work as 'off switches' for brain cells

Light switches for neurons have made enormous contributions to brain research by giving investigators access to "on switches" for brain cells. But, finding "off switches" has been much more challenging. [More]
UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

UNSW Australia to co-host sixth International Nanomedicine Conference in Sydney

Advances in nanotechnology and nano-fabrication are fundamentally changing the future of medicine, enabling more effective diagnostics and targeted drugs, and new bioactive materials that can help repair our bodies. [More]
ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named Robert L. Nussbaum, M.D., chief medical officer of invitae and clinical professor of medicine (volunteer) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Roderick R. McInnes, CM, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital and Alva chair in human genetics, Canada Research chair in neurogenetics, and professor of human genetics and biochemistry at McGill University; and Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D., president and director of the Marine Biological Laboratory and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago; as the 2015 recipients of its annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education. [More]
Pharma Two B reports positive results from P2B001 Phase IIb study for treatment of early stage PD

Pharma Two B reports positive results from P2B001 Phase IIb study for treatment of early stage PD

Pharma Two B Ltd., a privately held company developing innovative therapeutics based on previously approved drugs, announced today the successful results of the company's Phase IIb pivotal study of P2B001 for the treatment of early stage Parkinson's Disease (PD). [More]
New UK Parkinson's Excellence Network can transform care for people affected by Parkinson's

New UK Parkinson's Excellence Network can transform care for people affected by Parkinson's

The newly launched UK Parkinson's Excellence Network can transform care for those affected by Parkinson's, according to an article in Neurodegenerative Disease Management. [More]
Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

Errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's 18 years before diagnosis

A new study suggests that errors on memory and thinking tests may signal Alzheimer's up to 18 years before the disease can be diagnosed. The research is published in the June 24, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

Potential new class of drugs lessen neurodegeneration in rat model of Parkinson's disease

The first test in a mammalian model of a potential new class of drugs to treat Parkinson's disease shows abatement of neurodegeneration in the brains of test rats and no significant toxicities, University of Alabama at Birmingham and Pfizer Inc. researchers report online in The Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

University of Pittsburgh surgeon receives Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine

The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Molecular Medicine announced today that the fourth Anthony Cerami Award in Translational Medicine will be conferred to Thomas E. Starzl, MD, PhD, professor of surgery at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. The award is in recognition of his research in organ transplantation and alloengraftment mechanisms. [More]
New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

New 3D cell culture system could facilitate search for therapeutic agents for Parkinson's disease

The progressive loss of neurons in the brain of Parkinson's patients is slow yet inexorable. So far, there are no drugs that can halt this insidious process. [More]

Researchers determine underlying barriers to carrying out effective clinical trials in Parkinson's disease

Despite an urgent need for new medications, clinical trials in Parkinson's disease (PD) have a relatively low rate of success. [More]
WHO prequalifies new male circumcision device to prevent HIV

WHO prequalifies new male circumcision device to prevent HIV

The ShangRing, a novel medical device for voluntary medical male circumcision, has received prequalification from the World Health Organization (WHO) for use. [More]
OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

OhioHealth Neuroscience Center launched at Riverside Methodist Hospital

On July 6, 2015, OhioHealth will open its doors to the new OhioHealth Neuroscience Center on Riverside Methodist Hospital's campus. [More]
Research shows New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile

Research shows New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile

Research has shown that New Zealand blackcurrants are good for keeping us mentally young and agile, a finding that could have potential in managing the mental decline associated with aging populations, or helping people with brain disorders such as Parkinson's disease or depression. [More]
Parkinson's disease may start in the gastrointestinal tract

Parkinson's disease may start in the gastrointestinal tract

The chronic neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease affects an increasing number of people. However, scientists still do not know why some people develop Parkinson's disease. Now researchers from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital have taken an important step towards a better understanding of the disease. [More]
NYU Langone receives $25 million to establish Fresco Institute for PD and movement disorders

NYU Langone receives $25 million to establish Fresco Institute for PD and movement disorders

NYU Langone Medical Center today announced that the Paolo and Marlene Fresco Foundation (Fresco Foundation) has generously given $25 million to establish the international Marlene and Paolo Fresco Institute for Parkinson's & Movement Disorders. [More]
Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Research explores screening methods, clinical care for patients with Alzheimer's and all forms of dementia

Every 67 seconds someone is the United States develops Alzheimer's disease or some form of dementia. It's the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S. and it's the only cause of death in the top 10 in America that cannot be prevented, cured or slowed. This month, as the nation observes "Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month," James E. Galvin, M.D., M.P.H., one of the most prominent neuroscientists in the country, is at the helm of cutting-edge research, screening methods and clinical care for all forms of dementia and cognitive impairments as well as neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement