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Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
Levodopa dose linked to malnutrition risk in Parkinson’s disease

Levodopa dose linked to malnutrition risk in Parkinson’s disease

The malnutrition often seen in patients with Parkinson’s disease could be partly an effect of levodopa medication, research suggests. [More]
Renowned photographer creates 'Profiles of LBD' portrait series to support LBD campaign

Renowned photographer creates 'Profiles of LBD' portrait series to support LBD campaign

In honor of Lewy Body Dementia (LBD) Awareness Month, the Lewy Body Dementia Association proudly unveils, "The Profiles of LBD," a portrait series of families living with the disease. [More]
Autonomic dysfunction highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease, regardless of age, disease duration

Autonomic dysfunction highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease, regardless of age, disease duration

New findings from The Parkinson Alliance (PA) survey entitled "Autonomic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease With and Without Deep Brain Stimulation" show that autonomic dysfunction was highly prevalent in Parkinson's disease (PD), regardless of age and disease duration. [More]
Sheffield researchers find vital new evidence on how to reverse effects of Parkinson's mutation

Sheffield researchers find vital new evidence on how to reverse effects of Parkinson's mutation

Researchers from the University of Sheffield have found vital new evidence on how to target and reverse the effects caused by one of the most common genetic causes of Parkinson's. [More]
Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Researchers define the process of Parkinson's disease using genetic mouse model

Parkinson's Disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder. In Germany alone, almost half a million people are affected. The focus of the disease is the progressive degeneration of dopamine-producing nerve cells in a certain region of the midbrain, the substantia nigra. Misfolded proteins are the cause. Until recently, it was unclear why damage is confined to specific nerve cells. [More]
Ampro Industries spreads HIV/AIDS awareness through "A Positive Message" campaign

Ampro Industries spreads HIV/AIDS awareness through "A Positive Message" campaign

It is well known that Ampro Industries, Inc., is a leader when it comes to giving back to the community. The company truly believes in going the extra mile for those who have kept their styling gels number one for decades. [More]
Penn State scientists find that mitochondrial disease more prevalent in older moms

Penn State scientists find that mitochondrial disease more prevalent in older moms

The discovery of a "maternal age effect" by a team of Penn State scientists that could be used to predict the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations in maternal egg cells -- and the transmission of these mutations to children -- could provide valuable insights for genetic counseling. [More]
Parkinson's disease can migrate from gut to brain, shows research

Parkinson's disease can migrate from gut to brain, shows research

Parkinson's disease is strongly linked to the degeneration of the brain's movement center. In the last decade, the question of where the disease begins has led researchers to a different part of the human anatomy. [More]

Study: People with PSP experience more severe cognitive impairments than those with PD

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have established how two diseases that present in similar ways are in fact quite different. [More]
Researchers discover mechanism that leads to generation of new nerve cells after stroke

Researchers discover mechanism that leads to generation of new nerve cells after stroke

A previously unknown mechanism through which the brain produces new nerve cells after a stroke has been discovered at Lund University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden. The findings have been published in the journal SCIENCE. [More]
UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

UC Berkeley, UCSF researchers team up to create center for neurodegenerative disease research

Researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have teamed up to create an innovative, integrated center for research on neurodegenerative diseases. Supported by a $3 million grant from the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, the new center aims to pave the way to developing novel treatments for diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease by investigating the many ways that proteins can malfunction within cells. [More]
Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with healthy diet and lifestyle less likely to have stroke

Women with a healthy diet and lifestyle may be less likely to have a stroke by more than half, according to a study published in the October 8, 2014, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
AT2101 drug, evaluated for Gaucher disease, slows progression of Parkinson's disease in mice

AT2101 drug, evaluated for Gaucher disease, slows progression of Parkinson's disease in mice

A new study from UCLA found that a drug being evaluated to treat an entirely different disorder helped slow the progression of Parkinson's disease in mice. [More]
Study identifies six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking

Study identifies six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking

A new, large-scale study has identified six new genetic variants associated with habitual coffee drinking. The genome-wide meta-analysis, led by Harvard School of Public Health and Brigham and Women's Hospital researchers, helps explain why a given amount of coffee or caffeine has different effects on different people and provides a genetic basis for future research exploring the links between coffee and health. [More]
Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Groundbreaking study tracks precise path of rabies to the central nervous system

Rabies causes acute inflammation of the brain, producing psychosis and violent aggression. The virus, which paralyzes the body's internal organs, is always deadly for those unable to obtain vaccines in time. Some 55,000 people die from rabies every year. [More]
U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

U-M scientists launch $11.5 million effort to better understand cause of Parkinson's disease

Deep in the brains of the million Americans with Parkinson's disease, changes to their brain cells put them at high risk of dangerous falls -- a problem that resists even the most modern treatments. [More]
Grand Valley researcher receives grant to study molecular biomarkers to monitor Parkinson's disease

Grand Valley researcher receives grant to study molecular biomarkers to monitor Parkinson's disease

A researcher at Grand Valley State University has received a grant to continue studying if molecular biomarkers can be used to monitor the advancement of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

Protein that plays key role in neurological diseases regulates neuronal communication by self-association

The protein alpha-synuclein is a well-known player in Parkinson's disease and other related neurological conditions, such as dementia with Lewy bodies. Its normal functions, however, have long remained unknown. [More]
Gaucher disease: an interview with Dr Clement Olivier, Shire

Gaucher disease: an interview with Dr Clement Olivier, Shire

Gaucher disease is the most common condition within a family of rare diseases known as the lysosomal storage diseases. The disease causes lipids to accumulate in cells, which is why it is referred to as a storage disorder. The accumulation occurs mainly in the spleen, liver, and bones, but may also occur in the lungs, heart, and central nervous system. [More]
CMU's BrainHub initiative receives major boost from renowned Pittsburgh philanthropist

CMU's BrainHub initiative receives major boost from renowned Pittsburgh philanthropist

Just weeks after the launch of a global initiative to leverage its unique strengths to impact brain research, Carnegie Mellon University has received a major boost from renowned Pittsburgh philanthropist Henry L. Hillman in the form of a new $5 million gift to support CMU's BrainHub. [More]