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Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

TREM2 protein may help slow progression of multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease

Highlighting a potential target in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) and Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests that triggering a protein found on the surface of brain cells may help slow the progression of these and other neurological diseases. [More]
New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

New genetic discovery may lead to effective treatments for Huntington's disease

A new genetic discovery in the field of Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way in determining severity of this neurological disease when using specific treatments. This study may provide insight for treatments that would be effective in slowing down or postponing the death of neurons for people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. [More]
Perceived cost affects placebo response in Parkinson’s disease

Perceived cost affects placebo response in Parkinson’s disease

Patients with Parkinson’s disease may gain a greater benefit from a placebo treatment if they believe it to be expensive, research suggests. [More]
Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Study: Levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel improves quality of life in advanced PD patients

Although levodopa remains the "gold standard" to effectively control motor deficits in the treatment of early stage Parkinson's disease (PD), it loses effectiveness as the disease progresses. After four to six years of treatment with oral medications for Parkinson's disease, about 40% of patients experience lack of muscle control (dyskinesias), end-of-dose wearing off, and fluctuations in "On/Off" states. [More]
UC San Diego Health System's Movement Disorder Center joins NPF Center of Excellence network

UC San Diego Health System's Movement Disorder Center joins NPF Center of Excellence network

The Movement Disorder Center at UC San Diego Health System has been designated the 41st Center of Excellence in the National Parkinson Foundation's global network. This designation is the highest recognition offered by NPF to a Parkinson's specialty clinic. It represents the consensus of leaders in the field that the UC San Diego program is among the world's leading centers for Parkinson's research, outreach and care. [More]
Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis

Drinking coffee may be associated with a lower risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease often face difficulties with reduced visual contrast acuity

Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) often have difficulties with visual acuity in low-contrast images. Because they may have normal high-contrast vision, this is often overlooked during routine eye exams. In the current issue of the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, researchers report that PD patients had significantly worse vision for low-contrast images at close (40 cm) and far (2 m) distances. Even for high-contrast images, PD patients' vision was deficient at far distances. [More]
Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

Sleeping more than eight hours a night could increase risk of stroke

People who sleep more than eight hours a night may have an increased risk of stroke, according to a new study published in the February 25, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists find new approach to treat Parkinson's disease

UK scientists have developed a peptide that sticks to the protein that causes Parkinson's disease, stopping it from killing brain cells. The research highlights a potential new route for slowing the progress of this incurable disease. [More]
Prexton closes €8.7 million in Series A financing to develop treatments for Parkinson’s disease

Prexton closes €8.7 million in Series A financing to develop treatments for Parkinson’s disease

Prexton Therapeutics, a biopharmaceutical company developing novel therapeutic compounds for the treatment of CNS conditions including Parkinson’s disease, today announces the closing of a Series A financing of €8.7 million ($10 million) co-led by Sunstone Capital and Ysios Capital. [More]
New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

New skin test may help detect abnormal proteins in patients with Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

Scientists have discovered a skin test that may shed new light on Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, according to a study released today will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit resistance to aspirin may be at risk of more severe strokes

People who exhibit a resistance to aspirin may be more likely to have more severe strokes than people who still respond to the drug, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
LSU Health New Orleans finalizes deal with CB BioSciences

LSU Health New Orleans finalizes deal with CB BioSciences

The Office of Technology Management at LSU Health New Orleans has finalized a deal with CB BioSciences, Inc., a startup drug development company to build a platform around the intellectual property portfolio of Chu Chen, PhD, LSU Health New Orleans Professor of Neuroscience. [More]
Neurodegenerative disease research using NMR: an interview with Christian Griesinger

Neurodegenerative disease research using NMR: an interview with Christian Griesinger

Christian Griesinger, director of the NMR-based Structural Biology department at the Max-Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, talks about his research into neurodegenerative diseases using NMR to examine the dynamics of disordered proteins. [More]
Saluda Medical receives $10 million in Series B financing

Saluda Medical receives $10 million in Series B financing

Saluda Medical has today announced that it has received $10 million in Series B financing bringing a breakthrough treatment for chronic pain one step closer to reality. [More]
Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

Virus that causes chicken pox and shingles linked to giant cell arteritis

A new study developed at the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the Anschutz Medical Campus links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. [More]
Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis may have lower levels of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory nutrients

Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) may have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, such as folate from food and vitamin E, than healthy people, according to a new study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 67th Annual Meeting in Washington, DC, April 18 to 25, 2015. [More]
New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

New study finds that statins may not reduce risk for Parkinson's disease

The use of statins may not be associated with lowering risk for Parkinson's disease, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine and National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. The findings cast doubts on reports suggesting that the cholesterol-lowering medications may protect against this neurodegenerative brain disorder. [More]
New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

New study links chicken pox and shingles virus to giant cell arteritis in elderly

A new study links the virus that causes chicken pox and shingles to a condition that inflames blood vessels on the temples and scalp in the elderly, called giant cell arteritis. The study is published in the February 18, 2015, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The condition can cause sudden blindness or stroke and can be life-threatening. [More]
Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

Weill Cornell receives NIH grant to study TB-causing bacteria

In an effort to stop tuberculosis (TB) from becoming progressively less treatable worldwide, the National Institutes of Health has awarded Weill Cornell Medical College more than $6.2 million in first-year funding to support a research collaboration among six institutions in close alliance with voluntary pharmaceutical partners. [More]