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Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
Duke researchers develop new cell-based drug screening test for dystonia

Duke researchers develop new cell-based drug screening test for dystonia

Duke University researchers have identified a common mechanism underlying separate forms of dystonia, a family of brain disorders that cause involuntary, debilitating and often painful movements, including twists and turns of different parts of the body. [More]
New stem cell research project to replicate brain's neural networks using 3D nanoprinting

New stem cell research project to replicate brain's neural networks using 3D nanoprinting

Aston University has launched MESO-BRAIN, a major stem cell research project which it hopes will develop three-dimensional (3D) nanoprinting techniques that can be used to replicate the brain's neural networks.​ [More]
Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

Investigational diabetes drug that impedes Parkinson's progression getting ready for human trials

A new investigational drug originally developed for type 2 diabetes is being readied for human clinical trials in search of the world's first treatment to impede the progression of Parkinson's disease following publication of research findings today in the journal Science Translational Medicine. [More]
New discovery paves way to development of biochemical test for diagnosing Parkinson's disease

New discovery paves way to development of biochemical test for diagnosing Parkinson's disease

Misfolded proteins associated with Parkinson's disease were detected in cerebrospinal fluid by scientists at McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, paving the way to development of a biochemical test to diagnosis the disease. [More]
Researchers develop new microfluidic device to study brain inflammation

Researchers develop new microfluidic device to study brain inflammation

The blood-brain barrier is a network of specialized cells that surrounds the arteries and veins within the brain. It forms a unique gateway that both provides brain cells with the nutrients they require and protects them from potentially harmful compounds. [More]
New study finds genetic link between Parkinson's disease and cognitive decline

New study finds genetic link between Parkinson's disease and cognitive decline

Although the hallmark symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) - such as involuntary shaking, slowness of movement and muscle rigidity - are related to movement, recent evidence has suggested that memory impairment plays an outsized role in diminished quality of life and the burden placed on caregivers. [More]
OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

OHSU scientists identify potential target for preventing and treating Alzheimer's disease

A new scientific discovery may provide a future avenue for treatment and prevention of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Bone density could be one of early indicators of brain degeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Researchers at NEOMED have just identified a major connection between areas of the brainstem - the ancient area that controls mood, sleep and metabolism - and detrimental changes to bone in a preclinical model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). [More]
Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Newborns with low levels of vitamin D may more likely develop multiple sclerosis in later life

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher levels of vitamin D, according to a study published in the November 30, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Upright posture in patients with Parkinson's disease exacerbates cognitive deficits, study shows

Upright posture in patients with Parkinson's disease exacerbates cognitive deficits, study shows

In a new study published online today in the journal Neurology, a research team led by neurologists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and neuropsychologists at Boston University has shown that when patients with Parkinson's disease experience a drop in blood pressure upon standing up - a condition known as orthostatic hypotension (OH) - they exhibit significant cognitive deficits. [More]
Researchers use microbubbles and ultrasound to transport drugs across blood–brain barrier

Researchers use microbubbles and ultrasound to transport drugs across blood–brain barrier

The impassable blood-brain barrier prevents microorganisms from entering our brain, however it also blocks medicines that could help treat Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. [More]
Gene mutation appears to increase risk of Parkinson's disease in Caucasians

Gene mutation appears to increase risk of Parkinson's disease in Caucasians

A defect in a gene that produces dopamine in the brain appears to accelerate the onset of Parkinson's disease, according to new research from Iowa State University. The effect is particularly dramatic for people under age 50. [More]
Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Understanding nucleation process could be critical for treating Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes

Whether it is clouds or champagne bubbles forming, or the early onset of Alzheimer's disease or Type 2 diabetes, a common mechanism is at work: nucleation processes. [More]
Researchers uncover neural progenitors in protective membranes covering the brain

Researchers uncover neural progenitors in protective membranes covering the brain

In a cross-domain study directed by professor Peter Carmeliet (VIB - KU Leuven), researchers discovered unexpected cells in the protective membranes that enclose the brain, the so called meninges. [More]
Sutter Health awarded $1.2 million by California Initiative to advance precision of care for multiple sclerosis

Sutter Health awarded $1.2 million by California Initiative to advance precision of care for multiple sclerosis

The not-for-profit Sutter Health network was awarded $1.2 million by the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine to support patients with multiple sclerosis—and help improve how we target and treat health matters across the entire state. [More]
Growing understanding of neuroplasticity could drive development of new therapeutic interventions

Growing understanding of neuroplasticity could drive development of new therapeutic interventions

A growing understanding of the highly "plastic," changeable nature of the brain--from the level of DNA, proteins, neuronal connections and networks, up to communication across brain regions--is driving the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat chronic pain, stroke, Parkinson's disease, and a variety of other disorders described in an article in Alternative and Complementary Therapies, a journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

Children born to mothers with rheumatoid arthritis may have increased risk of developing epilepsy

A new study shows a link between mothers with rheumatoid arthritis and children with epilepsy. [More]
Study reports increasing rates of hospital admissions for PD patients

Study reports increasing rates of hospital admissions for PD patients

Although treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD) is significantly extending the lives of patients, these patients are now being admitted to hospitals at increasing rates. [More]
Physical activity may help improve health and quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients

Physical activity may help improve health and quality of life of Parkinson's disease patients

A comprehensive review published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease confirms that people living with Parkinson's disease (PD) can benefit from being physically active, especially when it comes to improving gait and balance, and reducing risks of falls. [More]
Statins can help prevent first time heart attacks, strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors

Statins can help prevent first time heart attacks, strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors

Cholesterol-lowering drugs help prevent heart attacks and strokes in adults with cardiovascular risk factors such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and smoking, but have not yet had a heart attack or stroke, according to a large-scale analysis of clinical trial data led by the OHSU Pacific Northwest Evidence-Based Practice Center. [More]
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