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Parkinson's disease is a brain disorder. It occurs when certain nerve cells (neurons) in a part of the brain called the substantia nigra die or become impaired. When approximately 80 percent of neurons are damaged, the symptoms of Parkinson's disease appear. Parkinson's disease affects 1 in 100 people over the age of 60, with the average age of onset being 60 years. The risk of developing Parkinson's disease increases with age. In the United States, it is estimated that 60,000 new cases of Parkinson's disease are diagnosed each year, with 1.5 million Americans currently living with the disease.
New Norwegian study finds key mechanisms for future treatment of Parkinson's disease

New Norwegian study finds key mechanisms for future treatment of Parkinson's disease

A new Norwegian study shows new mechanisms behind Parkinson's disease, which can be key mechanisms for future treatment. [More]
Researchers find new way to quantify olfactory sensory neurons using PET radiotracer

Researchers find new way to quantify olfactory sensory neurons using PET radiotracer

Olfactory health - how well we are able to smell - is a reliable marker of the health of the brain, but the "smell identification tests" commonly used in studies of olfactory health do not offer a complete picture of what is happening. [More]
Scientists harness rabies viruses for assessing connectivity of nerve cell transplants

Scientists harness rabies viruses for assessing connectivity of nerve cell transplants

Scientists under the leadership of the University of Bonn have harnessed rabies viruses for assessing the connectivity of nerve cell transplants: coupled with a green fluorescent protein, the viruses show where replacement cells engrafted into mouse brains have connected to the host neural network. [More]
New way of repurposing existing drugs could unearth promising treatments for Parkinson’s disease

New way of repurposing existing drugs could unearth promising treatments for Parkinson’s disease

By bringing together cutting-edge stem cell technologies and computational biology, researchers at Oxford University have developed a unique way to identify existing drugs that could potentially be repurposed for treating Parkinson’s. [More]
Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Mapping premature infant's brain after birth may help better predict developmental problems

Scanning a premature infant's brain shortly after birth to map the location and volume of lesions, small areas of injury in the brain's white matter, may help doctors better predict whether the baby will have disabilities later, according to a new study published in the January 18, 2017, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

New Apple ResearchKit app from Penn Medicine focuses on sarcoidosis patients

Penn Medicine today launched its first Apple ResearchKit app, focused on patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory condition that can affect the lungs, skin, eyes, heart, brain, and other organs. [More]
Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

Synthesized steroid prevents lethal protein buildup in animal model of Parkinson's disease

A synthesized steroid mirroring one naturally made by the dogfish shark prevents the buildup of a lethal protein implicated in some neurodegenerative diseases, reports an international research team studying an animal model of Parkinson's disease. [More]
Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

Naturally-occurring compound can inhibit early formation of toxins linked to Parkinson's Disease

A naturally-occurring compound has been found to block a molecular process thought to underlie Parkinson's Disease, and to suppress its toxic products, scientists have reported. [More]
New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

New antibody design may pave way for treating diseases affecting the brain

Immunotherapy has proven to be effective against many serious diseases. But to treat diseases in the brain, the antibodies must first get past the obstacle of the blood-brain barrier. [More]
Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Skidmore College scientist discovers health benefits of balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet

Research by Skidmore College exercise scientist Paul Arciero has found that a balanced, protein-pacing, low-calorie diet that includes intermittent fasting not only achieves long-term weight loss, but also helps release toxins in the form of PCBs from the body fat stores, in addition to enhancing heart health and reducing oxidative stress. [More]
AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

AAN issues new guideline on mapping the brain before epilepsy surgery

Before epilepsy surgery, doctors may consider using brain imaging to locate language and memory functions in the brain instead of the more invasive procedure that is commonly used, according to a guideline published by the American Academy of Neurology in the January 11, 2017, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study strengthens therapeutic potential for niacin-based diet in treatment of Parkinson's disease

Study strengthens therapeutic potential for niacin-based diet in treatment of Parkinson's disease

People with certain forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease may benefit from boosting the amount of niacin in their diet, according to new research from the University of Leicester. [More]
Mediterranean plants may become source for 'elixir of life'

Mediterranean plants may become source for 'elixir of life'

The Mediterranean is a haven for lovers of crystal-clear seas and sun-kissed landscapes. Now, thanks to the work of scientists from the University of Malta and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, it has the added appeal of being an actual fountain of youth. [More]
The 10th annual symposium at UC Riverside focuses on glial-neuronal interactions in health and disease

The 10th annual symposium at UC Riverside focuses on glial-neuronal interactions in health and disease

The brain is home to two kinds of cells: neurons and glia, with the latter protecting the former. Glia, the stuff between neurons, are important also because they regulate and define neuron-neuron communication. [More]
Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

Experimental treatment shows early promise for improving Parkinson's symptoms

About fourteen years ago, Bill Crawford noticed a persistent twitching in one of his fingers that was interfering with his rehearsal time as the music pastor at Porter Memorial Church. [More]
Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Penn study finds evidence of AD neuropathology in post-mortem brains of LBD patients

Patients who had a diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) with dementia (PDD) or dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and had higher levels of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in their donated post-mortem brains also had more severe symptoms of these Lewy body diseases (LBD) during their lives, compared to those whose brains had less AD pathology, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Protein involved in neurological disorders can travel from brain to stomach

Protein involved in neurological disorders can travel from brain to stomach

Researchers of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases have found that "alpha-synuclein", a protein involved in a series of neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease, is capable of travelling from brain to stomach and that it does so following a specific pathway. [More]
Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

Mediterranean diet may help provide long-term protection to the brain

A new study shows that older people who followed a Mediterranean diet retained more brain volume over a three-year period than those who did not follow the diet as closely. [More]
BUSM professor receives Ellison Foundation grant to explore new Parkinson's disease target

BUSM professor receives Ellison Foundation grant to explore new Parkinson's disease target

Richard Myers, PhD, professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine, was recently awarded $100,000 from the Ellison Foundation for research to further study a Parkinson's disease (PD) target. [More]
Researchers create molecules with potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells

Researchers create molecules with potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells

Molecules with the potential to deliver healing power to stressed cells - such as those involved in heart attacks - have been created by University of Oregon researchers. [More]
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