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New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

New blood treatment technology could reduce malaria risk following blood transfusions

Patients, especially children, who undergo blood transfusions in sub-Saharan Africa are at high risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria. A new trial, published in The Lancet today, suggests that treating donated blood with a new technology that combines UV radiation and vitamin B is safe and could minimise the risk of malaria infection following blood transfusions. [More]
Scientists develop new strategy to combat wide range of viruses

Scientists develop new strategy to combat wide range of viruses

Scientists and health officials are marshalling forces to fight Zika, the latest in a string of recent outbreaks. Many of these efforts target that virus specifically, but some researchers are looking for a broader approach. Now one team reports in ACS' journal Macromolecules a new strategy to fight a wide range of viruses that appears to be safe in vivo and could evade a virus's ability to develop resistance. [More]
Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Hormonal contraception may increase susceptibility of women to genital infection

Women account for approximately half of all individuals living with HIV worldwide, and researchers wanted to identify the risk factors that increase susceptibility of women to genital infection. [More]
Researchers develop new mathematical model to evaluate best treatment protocol to clear infection

Researchers develop new mathematical model to evaluate best treatment protocol to clear infection

Antibiotic resistance is one of the most challenging problems in modern medicine. A new study by Erida Gjini and Patricia H. Brito from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, provides a new mathematical model to evaluate the best treatment protocol to clear an infection, by taking into account the role of the host immune system. [More]
Researchers focus on novel target to treat bacterial infection

Researchers focus on novel target to treat bacterial infection

Bacterial infection takes hold in the body when a pathogenic microorganism delivers toxins to healthy cells. One way bacteria accomplish this is by releasing vesicles, which act as tiny envelopes transporting toxins and other virulence factors to host cells. These toxins allow the bacteria to "make themselves at home" in cells. [More]
Newly launched TB-PACTS could be a valuable tool to combat world's leading infectious killer

Newly launched TB-PACTS could be a valuable tool to combat world's leading infectious killer

The Critical Path Institute, the Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, TB Alliance, and St. George's, University of London, are pleased to announce the launch of the TB-Platform for Aggregation of Clinical TB Studies. [More]
Panasonic’s new TwinGuard -86˚C chest freezers provide ultimate protection for valuable biological samples

Panasonic’s new TwinGuard -86˚C chest freezers provide ultimate protection for valuable biological samples

Panasonic’s new TwinGuard -86˚C chest freezers deliver the unsurpassed level of safety and sample security that is critical for valuable biological samples alongside exceptional ease of use and data monitoring. [More]
Researchers reveal how relatively unknown pathogen led to current Zika outbreak

Researchers reveal how relatively unknown pathogen led to current Zika outbreak

An analysis comparing the individual differences between over 40 strains of Zika virus (30 isolated from humans, 10 from mosquitoes, and 1 from monkeys) has identified significant changes in both amino acid and nucleotide sequences during the past half-century. [More]
Deadly ‘Crypto’ pathogen lures US researcher to UQ

Deadly ‘Crypto’ pathogen lures US researcher to UQ

Cryptococcus is so forsaken by research that it doesn’t even make the neglected diseases list – but the deadly fungal pathogen has lured an American scientist all the way to The University of Queensland. [More]
Spread of STIs, peer pressure may have transformed prehistoric humans to monogamists

Spread of STIs, peer pressure may have transformed prehistoric humans to monogamists

Prehistoric humans may have developed social norms that favour monogamy and punish polygamy thanks to the presence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and peer pressure, according to new research from the University of Waterloo in Canada. [More]
Novel antibiotics to overcome antibacterial resistance

Novel antibiotics to overcome antibacterial resistance

Small and innovative pharmaceutical companies, with products in early stages of development, presented some of their novel approaches and antimicrobial therapies under development during a dedicated session at the annual congress (ECCMID) of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases(ESCMID) in Amsterdam. [More]
Cell-signaling protein holds key to understanding autoantibody formation in lupus patients

Cell-signaling protein holds key to understanding autoantibody formation in lupus patients

A signaling molecule called interferon gamma could hold the key to understanding how harmful autoantibodies form in lupus patients. The finding could lead to new treatments for the chronic autoimmune disease, said researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
New data from studies evaluating diagnostic tools, therapies for infectious diseases released at ECCMID 2016

New data from studies evaluating diagnostic tools, therapies for infectious diseases released at ECCMID 2016

New data from ten late-breaking abstracts is released at ECCMID 2016 – the annual meeting of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Disease. [More]
New study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may have diseases carried out of Africa

New study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may have diseases carried out of Africa

A new study suggests that Neanderthals across Europe may well have been infected with diseases carried out of Africa by waves of anatomically modern humans, or Homo sapiens. As both were species of hominin, it would have been easier for pathogens to jump populations, say researchers. This might have contributed to the demise of Neanderthals. [More]
New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

New study demonstrates diversity, resourcefulness of Vibrio cholera

In humans, cholera is among the world's most deadly diseases, killing as many as 140,000 persons a year, according to World Health Organization statistics. But in aquatic environments far away from humans, the same bacterium attacks neighboring microbes with a toxic spear - and often steals DNA from other microorganisms to expand its own capabilities. [More]
Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

Novel method uses light-activated nanodrug to help fight antibiotic-resistant infections

A research team led by University of Arkansas chemist Jingyi Chen and University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences microbiologist Mark Smeltzer has developed an alternative therapeutic approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant infections. [More]
Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Investigators predict that new pneumonia epidemic in Beijing will likely to continue for longer time

Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections began rising in Beijing last spring, and by December, this pathogen was found in more than half of hospitalized children suffering from pneumonia in that city, according to investigators from the Capital Institute of Pediatrics, Beijing, China. [More]
LMU-led researchers define previously unknown signaling pathway that triggers inflammation

LMU-led researchers define previously unknown signaling pathway that triggers inflammation

Using a combination of newly developed methods, researchers led by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich immunologist Veit Hornung have defined a previously unknown pathway that triggers inflammation. [More]
New device can deliver diagnosis to patient in 30 minutes

New device can deliver diagnosis to patient in 30 minutes

When a person contracts a disease, it takes time to diagnose the symptoms. Cell culturing, immunoassay and a nucleic-acid based diagnostic cycle all take several days, if not a week to determine the results. Not only do sick patients suffer during this time period, the wait can also lead to unnecessary disease spreading and perhaps avoidable antibiotic use. [More]
Researchers explore four potential treatments for Lyme disease

Researchers explore four potential treatments for Lyme disease

The ticks that transmit Lyme dis­ease have mul­ti­plied aggres­sively over the past 20 years, and now thrive in half of all coun­ties in the U.S., according to a recent study in the Journal of Med­ical Entomology. [More]
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