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Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

Five-year $10.7M grant to study control, prevention of sexually-transmitted infections

The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry (UM SOD) and Medicine (UM SOM) jointly announced today that they have received a five-year $10.7 million grant award from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) of the National Institutes of Health to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases (STDs). [More]
Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

Researchers identify porcine enterovirus G using next-generation sequencing

He calls himself the bug hunter, but the target of his work consists of viruses that can only be found and identified with special methods and instruments. [More]
Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Antifungal drug resistance evoked through RNAi-dependent epimutations

Microorganisms like bacteria and fungi can evade treatment by acquiring mutations in the genes targeted by antibiotics or antifungal drugs. [More]

Showers and rivers may play role in the development of Crohn's disease

Humans may be exposed to bacteria linked with Crohn's disease through fine spray from showers and rivers according to research led by Lancaster University. [More]
First Edition: July, 21, 2014

First Edition: July, 21, 2014

Today's headlines include a story about an effort by regulators to widen insurer networks, as well as a range of other health policy developments. [More]
Researchers discover how dengue suppresses human immune system

Researchers discover how dengue suppresses human immune system

Scientists have discovered a new pathway the dengue virus takes to suppress the human immune system. This new knowledge deepens our understanding of the virus and could contribute to the development of more effective therapeutics. [More]
Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators identify gene that underlies devastating autoinflammatory condition in children

Investigators have identified a gene that underlies a very rare but devastating autoinflammatory condition in children. Several existing drugs have shown therapeutic potential in laboratory studies, and one is currently being studied in children with the disease, which the researchers named STING-associated vasculopathy with onset in infancy (SAVI). [More]
Scientists examine part of sample consisting of non-human DNA

Scientists examine part of sample consisting of non-human DNA

Much of what we know about Oetzi - for example what he looked like or that he suffered from lactose intolerance - stems from a tiny bone sample which allowed the decoding of his genetic make-up. [More]
Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

Researchers reveal molecular interplay between Roquin and RNA

The Roquin protein, discovered in 2005, controls T-cell activation and differentiation by regulating the expression of certain mRNAs. In doing so, it helps to guarantee immunological tolerance and prevents immune responses against the body's own structures that can lead to autoimmune disease. [More]
OSU creates new assay to test authenticity of primary drugs used to treat malaria

OSU creates new assay to test authenticity of primary drugs used to treat malaria

Chemists and students in science and engineering at Oregon State University have created a new type of chemical test, or assay, that's inexpensive, simple, and can tell whether or not one of the primary drugs being used to treat malaria is genuine - an enormous and deadly problem in the developing world. [More]
Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii evolves as it spreads to temperate climates

Cryptococcus gattii, a virulent fungus that has invaded the Pacific Northwest is highly adaptive and warrants global "public health vigilance," according to a study by an international team led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute. [More]
Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Interaction between 2 proteins can be responsible for allergic asthma after eating infected fruit

Researchers at the UPM suggest that the interaction between two proteins can be the responsible for the allergic asthma episodes after eating an infected fruit. [More]
Computational algorithms provide insight into how gut microbiota respond to infection over time

Computational algorithms provide insight into how gut microbiota respond to infection over time

Being sick due to an infection can make us feel lousy. But what must the ecosystem of bacteria, or microbiota, colonizing our guts be going through when hit with infection? A study from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) has utilized unique computational models to show how infection can affect bacteria that naturally live in our intestines. [More]
ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

ACS Infectious Diseases journal highlights chemistry and collaborative research area

The American Chemical Society (ACS) announced today that Courtney Aldrich, Ph.D., will head the brand-new, web-only journal ACS Infectious Diseases as editor-in-chief. With the first issue slated for publication in January 2015, the pioneering journal will meet a growing demand for a place to publish top-notch chemistry-focused infectious diseases research. [More]
Study results may lead to new approach for treatment of chronic ear infections in children

Study results may lead to new approach for treatment of chronic ear infections in children

Researchers from the University of Southern California and the Oak Crest Institute of Science have discovered the link between antibiotics and bacterial biofilm formation leading to chronic lung, sinus and ear infections. The study results, published in the current issue of PLOS ONE, illustrate how bacterial biofilms can actually thrive, rather than decrease, when given low doses of antibiotics. [More]

Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes increase risk of West Nile virus

Mosquitoes infected with the bacteria Wolbachia are more likely to become infected with West Nile virus and more likely to transmit the virus to humans, according to a team of researchers. [More]

Pathogen and ranavirus also contribute in amphibian extinctions

Amphibian declines and extinctions around the world have been linked to an emerging fungal disease called chytridiomycosis, but new research from the National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis (NIMBioS) shows that another pathogen, ranavirus, may also contribute. [More]
Samples from Chobani yogurt contain most virulent form of fungus

Samples from Chobani yogurt contain most virulent form of fungus

Samples isolated from Chobani yogurt that was voluntarily recalled in September 2013 have been found to contain the most virulent form of a fungus called Mucor circinelloides, which is associated with infections in immune-compromised people. [More]
New research unit to uncover multi-drug resistant bacteria in hospitals

New research unit to uncover multi-drug resistant bacteria in hospitals

Multi-drug resistant bacteria have increased dramatically in hospitals in recent years and present immense challenges to staff and patients, often with fatal results. [More]
Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

Scientists uncover mechanisms that can protect against lethal bacteria

An important development in understanding how the bacterium that causes pneumonia, meningitis and septicaemia remains harmlessly in the nose and throat has been discovered at the University of Liverpool's Institute of Infection and Global Health. [More]