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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Study looks at impact of amyloid imaging on diagnosis, management of patients with cognitive impairment

Eli Lilly and Company and Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Lilly, today announced new data showing that knowledge of amyloid status as determined by Florbetapir F 18 Injection imaging altered diagnosis and management in the majority of patients being studied. [More]
Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

Study points to potential treatment for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura

A rare autoimmune disease creates sudden pain in the abdomen or the head, sending a patient to the emergency room with a potentially fatal condition. The pain comes from a multitude of blockages of tiny blood vessels, formed after the patient's own immune system somehow inhibits an enzyme that is vital to control clotting. [More]
Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

Gene responsible for cancer growth plays unexpected role in prostate cancer

A gene that is responsible for cancer growth plays a totally unexpected role in prostate cancer. The gene Stat3 is controlled by the immune modulator interleukin 6 and normally supports the growth of cancer cells. The international research team led by Prof. Lukas Kenner from the Medical University of Vienna, the Veterinary University of Vienna, and the Ludwig Boltzmann Institiute for Cancer Research (LBI-CR) discovered a missing link for an essential role of Stat3 and IL-6 signalling in prostate cancer progression. [More]
New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

New TCR therapy demonstrates encouraging clinical responses in patients with multiple myeloma

Results from a clinical trial investigating a new T cell receptor (TCR) therapy that uses a person's own immune system to recognize and destroy cancer cells demonstrated a clinical response in 80 percent of multiple myeloma patients with advanced disease after undergoing autologous stem cell transplants (ASCT). [More]
Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

Study identifies new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development

A recent study conducted at Nathan S. Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research and NYU Langone Medical Center implicates a new culprit in Alzheimer's disease development. The research reveals that ßCTF -- the precursor of the amyloid beta (Aß) peptide -- acts at the earliest stage of Alzheimer's to initiate a range of abnormalities leading to the loss of groups of neurons critical for memory formation. [More]
Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune’s NY-ESO-1 TCR-engineered T-cell therapy mediates sustained antitumor effects in multiple myeloma patients

Adaptimmune Therapeutics plc, a clinical stage biopharmaceutical company focused on the use of T-cell therapy to treat cancer, today announced that data from its Phase I/II study of its affinity enhanced T-cell receptor therapeutic targeting the NY-ESO-1 cancer antigen in patients with multiple myeloma has been published in Nature Medicine. [More]
New study suggests novel ways to treat serous retinal detachment

New study suggests novel ways to treat serous retinal detachment

Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss in older individuals. AMD and other serious chronic eye problems that affect younger individuals result when fluid accumulates abnormally under or within the retina. A new study published in The American Journal of Pathology shows for the first time that the release of substances from mast cells may be a causal factor in this type of eye pathology, and inhibitors of this release may offer new ways to treat serous retinal detachment. [More]
Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Stanford researchers identify iron-containing microglia in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease

Examining post-mortem tissue from the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease, Stanford University School of Medicine investigators identified what appear to be iron-containing microglia -- specialized scavenger cells that sometimes become inflammatory -- in a particular part of the hippocampus, a key brain structure whose integrity is critical to memory formation. [More]
Alzheimer's Association recognizes four scientists with Lifetime Achievement Awards at AAIC 2015

Alzheimer's Association recognizes four scientists with Lifetime Achievement Awards at AAIC 2015

The Alzheimer's Association recognizes four leading scientists for their contributions to advancing Alzheimer's disease and dementia research. The awards were presented during the opening session at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington, D.C. [More]
MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research presented at AAIC 2015

At the Alzheimer's Association International Conference 2015 in Washington D.C., MetLife Foundation presented its annual MetLife Foundation Awards for Medical Research. These awards were presented to Randall Bateman, M.D., and Christian Haass, Ph.D., for their contributions in advancing Alzheimer's disease research. [More]
New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

New monoclonal antibodies may provide blueprint for effective Alzheimer's disease treatments

Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center's Center for Cognitive Neurology have evidence that monoclonal antibodies they developed may provide the blueprint for effective treatments for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. [More]
NeoGenomics announces launch of new germline cancer predisposition testing services

NeoGenomics announces launch of new germline cancer predisposition testing services

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services, announced today the launch of a new line of germline cancer predisposition testing services. The new tests include comprehensive testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 encompassing an analysis of all exons and adjacent intronic regions. [More]
Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers find evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism to fatal type of lymphoma

Researchers from the School of Medicine at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have found evidence that directly links disrupted metabolism (energy production in cells) to a common and often fatal type of lymphoma. [More]
Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Type 2 diabetes patients with specific genetic markers at higher risk of developing Alzheimer's disease

Certain patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may have specific genetic risk factors that put them at higher risk for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published recently in Molecular Aspects of Medicine. [More]
Simple, low-cost method for DNA profiling of human hairs could help trace criminals

Simple, low-cost method for DNA profiling of human hairs could help trace criminals

A simple, lower-cost new method for DNA profiling of human hairs developed by the University of Adelaide should improve opportunities to link criminals to serious crimes. [More]
Medtronic launches GenCut Core Biopsy System for minimally invasive use with the superDimension navigation system for lung tissue biopsies

Medtronic launches GenCut Core Biopsy System for minimally invasive use with the superDimension navigation system for lung tissue biopsies

Medtronic now offers the GenCut(TM) core biopsy system, a unique lung tissue biopsy tool for use with the superDimension(TM) navigation system. The superDimension(TM) system enables a minimally invasive approach to accessing difficult-to-reach areas of the lung, which can aid in the diagnosis of lung cancer. [More]
Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

Protein delivery reagent assists neurodegeneration research

AMSBIO announces that Belgian researchers have cited use of BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent to introduce Tau seeds into HEK293 cells. BioPORTER Protein Delivery Reagent is a unique lipid formulation that allows direct translocation of proteins into living cells. [More]
Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

Magnetic nanoparticles may hold key to bringing immunotherapy into successful clinical use

In recent years, researchers have hotly pursued immunotherapy, a promising form of treatment that relies on harnessing and training the body's own immune system to better fight cancer and infection. Now, results of a study led by Johns Hopkins investigators suggests that a device composed of a magnetic column paired with custom-made magnetic nanoparticles may hold a key to bringing immunotherapy into widespread and successful clinical use. [More]
U of T researchers discover new details about key gene involved in ALS

U of T researchers discover new details about key gene involved in ALS

A University of Toronto research team has discovered new details about a key gene involved in ALS, perhaps humanity's most puzzling, intractable disease. [More]
Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Wayne State researcher receives $1.9 million grant to improve EPCs-based cell therapy for vascular diseases

Chunying Li, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Wayne State University School of Medicine's Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, has secured his first R01 grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to study the role and mechanism of the chemokine receptor CXCR2 in regulating new blood vessel formation, the so-called angiogenesis. [More]
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