Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

About 30% of iPSCs not safe for clinical use, report multi-institutional researchers

As the promise of using regenerative stem cell therapies draws closer, a consortium of biomedical scientists reports about 30 percent of induced pluripotent stem cells they analyzed from 10 research institutions were genetically unstable and not safe for clinical use. [More]
BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

BNPs have potential to enable early diagnosis, long-term treatment of RA with minimal side effects

The results of a study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress showed that tiny particles made of a biodegradable polymer (BNPs -- biodegradable polymer nanoparticles) have the potential to enable early detection and efficient long-term treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with minimal side effects. [More]
Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

Drug candidate delivered by plant-virus-based carrier shows promise for triple-negative breast cancer

In a pair of firsts, researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology have shown that the drug candidate phenanthriplatin can be more effective than an approved drug in vivo, and that a plant-virus-based carrier successfully delivers a drug in vivo. [More]
Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Far-UVC light can combat deadly scourge of drug-resistant surgical site infections

Scientists from the Center for Radiological Research at Columbia University Medical Center have shown that a narrow wavelength of ultraviolet (UV) light safely killed drug-resistant MRSA bacteria in mice, demonstrating a potentially safe and cost-effective way to reduce surgical site infections, a major public health concern. [More]
UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

UAB receives new image-guided robotic system for early prostate cancer diagnosis

The world-renowned iSR'obotTM Mona Lisa makes its way to the United States, providing urologic surgeons with a tool to diagnose prostate cancer earlier through accurate diagnosis and precise localization that may allow for targeted treatments in the future. [More]
Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Researchers identify lymphatic endothelial lineage that shows potential for new anti-cancer treatment

Identifying the cell of origin is crucial to understanding how a tumor develops and metastasizes and for developing targeted therapies. [More]
B lymphocytes can influence psoriasis by regulating cytokine IL-10

B lymphocytes can influence psoriasis by regulating cytokine IL-10

"A pathological and very complex autoimmune reaction of the skin": This is the definition doctors and scientists use to describe psoriasis, a disease that affects one to three percent of the population. [More]
New blood test helps detect MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease

New blood test helps detect MCI stage of Alzheimer's disease

A research team, led by Dr. Robert Nagele from Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine and Durin Technologies, Inc., has announced the development of a blood test that leverages the body's immune response system to detect an early stage of Alzheimer's disease - referred to as the mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage - with unparalleled accuracy. [More]
HKUST study suggests innate immune response plays vital  role in pathogenesis of AD

HKUST study suggests innate immune response plays vital role in pathogenesis of AD

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating condition with no known effective treatment. The disease is characterized by memory loss as well as impaired locomotor ability, reasoning, and judgment. Emerging evidence suggests that the innate immune response plays a major role in the pathogenesis of AD. [More]
Advances in precision diagnostics aid accurate detection of CNS tumors

Advances in precision diagnostics aid accurate detection of CNS tumors

Thanks to new methods of precision diagnostics, such as DNA sequencing and epigenetic analyses, it is becoming increasingly possible to identify specific central nervous system (CNS) tumors accurately and to provide targeted treatment. The Comprehensive Cancer Center of MedUni Vienna and Vienna General Hospital is one of the top centers in the world for diagnosing and treating this type of tumor. [More]
Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Personlized exercise pattern may help reduce neuropathic symptoms of chemotherapy

Researchers at the University of Rochester Wilmot Cancer Institute discovered something simple and inexpensive to reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy--exercise. [More]
New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

New treatment shows promise against hard-to-treat eye cancer

Eye cancer took the life of author and neurologist Oliver Sacks last year, bringing attention to the rare and deadly disease. Scientists have tried to develop precision treatments against cancers like this one, but the mutations that cause them have proven difficult to block with drugs. [More]
Clinical study finds two topical skin creams as effective noninvasive treatments for low-risk superficial BCC

Clinical study finds two topical skin creams as effective noninvasive treatments for low-risk superficial BCC

Basal cell carcinoma is one of the most common cancers and its incidence is increasing worldwide, putting a significant burden on health services. Topical treatments are available for superficial basal cell carcinoma (BCC) but there has a lack of long-term follow-up data to guide treatment decisions. [More]
Scientists discover master dimmer switches that control activity of immune cells

Scientists discover master dimmer switches that control activity of immune cells

A person's genetic makeup plays a role in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis that develop when the body is attacked by its own immune system. But little is known about how immune cells are pushed into overdrive. [More]
Gut microbe's metabolite butyrate hampers intestinal repair from IBD

Gut microbe's metabolite butyrate hampers intestinal repair from IBD

Intestinal stem cells are among the most rapidly dividing cells in the body, busily creating new cells to replace the ones that are constantly being sloughed off. But unlike stem cells elsewhere in the body, those in the intestine are hidden away, and for good reason, it turns out. [More]
Understanding mechanisms of aortic pathology to improve care

Understanding mechanisms of aortic pathology to improve care

Aortic disease, including aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection, is an important cause of cardiovascular morbidity and death. There have been exciting developments in caring for patients with aortic aneurysm and dissection, including great advances in diagnosis and endovascular therapies. [More]
Infection may trigger development of Alzheimer's disease

Infection may trigger development of Alzheimer's disease

A growing body of research on Alzheimer's disease suggests an infectious trigger for the development of the disease. According to Brian Balin, PhD, professor of pathology and chair of bio-medical sciences at Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, this could be the key to stopping the destructive process of Alzheimer's before it even starts. [More]
Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Correcting defective p73 gene function may be promising therapeutic strategy for chronic lung diseases

Rising global air pollution and increasing smoking prevalence in many developing nations will likely lead to a growing incidence of lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which currently affects more than 330 million people worldwide, is the third-leading cause of death and carries an estimated healthcare cost of $2.1 trillion. [More]
Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Using proteomic mass spectrometry imaging to detect malignant melanoma: an interview with Stephen Turner

Today, using anatomic pathology, the differences in appearance of a normal or a malignant lesion can be difficult to tell when just using light microscopy. [More]
New roadmap can help guide researchers to speed up biomarker-based research on Alzheimer's disease

New roadmap can help guide researchers to speed up biomarker-based research on Alzheimer's disease

Biomarkers could revolutionise the early detection of and therapy for Alzheimer's disease. However, experts attending the Congress of the European Academy of Neurology in Copenhagen criticized that the big breakthroughs are slow in coming because of a lack of priorities in research. [More]
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