Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Pathologists to collaborate on promise, challenges of immunotherapy at CAP16

Pathologists to collaborate on promise, challenges of immunotherapy at CAP16

At the College of American Pathologists annual meeting this month, more than 1,300 pathologists will collaborate on the promise, challenges, and questions surrounding immunotherapy—the subject of the opening Scientific Plenary at CAP16 - The Pathologists' Meeting in Las Vegas on Sept. 25. [More]
Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Social, emotional factors may raise risk of postpartum depression in mothers of preterm infants

Postpartum depression is the most common complication of pregnancy and childbirth, affecting up to 15 percent of all women within the first three months following delivery. [More]
Memory loss symptoms not sufficient to diagnose other forms of Alzheimer's

Memory loss symptoms not sufficient to diagnose other forms of Alzheimer's

Relying on clinical symptoms of memory loss to diagnose Alzheimer's disease may miss other forms of dementia caused by Alzheimer's that don't initially affect memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. [More]
Urine sample collection: is it easy Peezy?

Urine sample collection: is it easy Peezy?

As Dr Dawn Harper, GP and star of Embarrassing Bodies, stated at the Forte Medical Forum at the Royal Society of Medicine today: current urine sample collection pots were “clearly designed by men for men”. [More]
Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

Research reveals how Zika virus arrests fetal brain development in pigtail macaque

For the first time, abnormal brain development following a Zika infection during pregnancy has been documented experimentally in the offspring of a non-human primate. [More]
New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

New study raises safety concerns on clinical use of caspase inhibitors for liver diseases

Many acute and chronic liver diseases, including alcoholic hepatitis, result from apoptotic (programmed) cell death mediated by the enzyme caspase. Caspase inhibitors have therapeutic potential to treat and prevent apoptosis-mediated liver injury, and some are currently in clinical trials. [More]
Next-generation advanced translational research preclinical imaging system unveiled by Bruker

Next-generation advanced translational research preclinical imaging system unveiled by Bruker

Bruker today unveils two new preclinical imaging systems at the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2016 in New York. The new systems are designed to deliver highest performance and improved convenience for routine imaging, and enable novel translational research into the causes, progression, as well as potential diagnosis and treatment of disease. [More]
Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

Simplified approach to TAVI holds potential to save lives of many patients with rheumatic heart disease

A novel heart valve replacement method is revealed today that offers hope for the thousands of patients with rheumatic heart disease who need the procedure each year. The research is being presented at the SA Heart Congress 2016 [More]
UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

UC researchers offer more insights into how lack of gut bacteria influences fat absorption

A study led by University of Cincinnati lipid metabolism researchers lends additional insight into how bacteria in the gut, or lack thereof, influences intestinal mast cells (MMC) activation and perhaps fat absorption. [More]
Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Smartphone application may be feasible, effective sexual health education tool for teenage girls

Across the globe, there is increased focus on developing interventions related to comprehensive sexual health education for adolescents, with the ultimate goal of combatting unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. [More]
Scientists outline criteria for assessing vascular cognitive impairment in post-mortem brain tissue

Scientists outline criteria for assessing vascular cognitive impairment in post-mortem brain tissue

New research, led by academics at the University of Bristol, has outlined the first validated set of pathological criteria for assessing the likelihood that cognitive impairment was caused by vascular disease. [More]
Beta-blockers can help treat bone loss caused by antidepressants in mice

Beta-blockers can help treat bone loss caused by antidepressants in mice

The antidepressant fluoxetine causes bone loss by instructing the brain to send out signals that increase bone breakdown, but a beta-blocker can intercept the signals, a new study in mice has found. [More]
New computer program can predict underlying genomics of ER+ breast cancer

New computer program can predict underlying genomics of ER+ breast cancer

The number of tubules in tumors may predict which women with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer will benefit from hormone therapy alone and which require chemotherapy, researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found. [More]
Researchers find genomic material from Zika virus in tears

Researchers find genomic material from Zika virus in tears

Researchers have found that Zika virus can live in eyes and have identified genetic material from the virus in tears, according to a study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. [More]
New sensor can quickly and cost-effectively detect deadly E.coli bacteria

New sensor can quickly and cost-effectively detect deadly E.coli bacteria

Scientists have built a new sensor that can detect the potentially deadly E.coli bacteria in 15-20 minutes, much faster than traditional lab tests. E.coli can be transmitted in contaminated food and water, posing particular risks to children and the elderly. [More]
New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

New drug holds potential for treating advanced mastocytosis

Most people have never heard of mastocytosis. It's a rare, sometimes deadly, immune disorder. Now new research may help those with advanced mastocytosis and possibly many more people, too. [More]
Nanomechanical microcantilevers can quickly detect mutations in patients with malignant melanoma

Nanomechanical microcantilevers can quickly detect mutations in patients with malignant melanoma

Changes in the genetic make-up of tissue samples can be detected quickly and easily using a new method based on nanotechnology. [More]
Experimental co-culture approach facilitates study of cellular events underlying Huntington's disease

Experimental co-culture approach facilitates study of cellular events underlying Huntington's disease

Using an experimental co-culture approach in which two different types of neurons from a mouse model of Huntington's disease (HD) are grown side-by-side, connecting to form critically impacted circuits, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a subunit of a protein that, when expressed, reverse the mutated gene effects responsible for HD. [More]
HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

HIF-2 inhibitors could be promising target to combat kidney cancer

A new class of drugs called HIF-2 inhibitors is more effective and better tolerated than the standard of care drug sunitinib in treating kidney cancer, researchers with the Kidney Cancer Program at Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center have found. [More]
New collaborative initiative to develop novel ways of screening drugs for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

New collaborative initiative to develop novel ways of screening drugs for bipolar disorder, schizophrenia

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies will co-lead a $15.4 million effort to develop new systems for quickly screening libraries of drugs for potential effectiveness against schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) has announced. [More]
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