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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
MED15 may serve as prognostic marker for HNSCC recurrence

MED15 may serve as prognostic marker for HNSCC recurrence

A new study provides the first evidence that the mediator complex subunit 15 (MED15) may play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). MED15 overexpression was found to be associated with higher mortality rates in HNSCC patients with cancer recurrence, particularly in oral cavity/oropharyngeal tumors, according to the study published in The American Journal of Pathology. [More]
Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Hypermethylation serves as protective barrier inhibiting development of ALS, FTD

Penn Medicine researchers have discovered that hypermethylation - the epigenetic ability to turn down or turn off a bad gene implicated in 10 to 30 percent of patients with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) - serves as a protective barrier inhibiting the development of these diseases. [More]
Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

Scientists discover how ALL cells mutate to survive chemotherapy

By genomic sequencing of leukemia cells from relapsed patients at different stages, scientists have discovered key details of how acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells mutate to survive chemotherapy. These mutations enable the cells to proliferate, causing relapse and often death. [More]
AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie signs exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N for Alzheimer's disease therapies

AbbVie today announced that it has entered into an exclusive worldwide license agreement with C2N Diagnostics, a privately held protein diagnostic and therapeutic discovery company, to develop and commercialize a portfolio of anti-tau antibodies for the treatment of Alzheimer's Disease and other neurological disorders. [More]
Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Antech Diagnostics agrees to acquire assets of AVRL for $21 million from Abaxis

Abaxis, Inc., a medical products company manufacturing point-of-care blood analysis systems, and VCA Inc., a leading animal healthcare company in the United States and Canada, today jointly announced Antech Diagnostics, Inc., VCA's laboratory division, has agreed to acquire the assets of AVRL (Abaxis Veterinary Reference Laboratory) from Abaxis for $21 million in cash. [More]
Study reveals how Grhl2 plays a role in kidney function

Study reveals how Grhl2 plays a role in kidney function

The kidney carries out vital functions by continuously filtering the blood and excreting waste products into the urine. This is achieved by a complex system of tubules which transports the urine and regulates its composition. [More]
UVA researcher identifies potential therapeutic target for myotonic muscular dystrophy

UVA researcher identifies potential therapeutic target for myotonic muscular dystrophy

A doctor who was one of the discoverers of the gene responsible for myotonic muscular dystrophy has now identified a therapeutic that could modify progression of muscle damage and muscle dysfunction associated with the disease - issues that cause patients significant disability and deterioration in quality of life. [More]
DigiPath, Blue Line sign preferred supplier marketing and resource-sharing agreement

DigiPath, Blue Line sign preferred supplier marketing and resource-sharing agreement

DigiPath, Inc., the independent digital pathology and cannabis testing, education, and media firm, has entered into a preferred supplier marketing and resource-sharing agreement with Blue Line Protection Group. [More]
GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

GW, Children's National researchers awarded $6.2 million grant to solve pediatric dysphagia

An interdisciplinary group of researchers from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Children's National Health System has been awarded a program project grant (PPG) for $6.2 million from The Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to solve pediatric dysphagia -- a chronic difficulty with feeding and swallowing in children. [More]
Combination of anti-Nodal and DTIC therapy can produce anti-cancer effects

Combination of anti-Nodal and DTIC therapy can produce anti-cancer effects

Metastatic melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer deaths in the United States; once melanoma has spread (metastasized), life expectancy for patients can be dramatically shortened. [More]
Glyconanoparticles may help reduce cell damage and inflammation after stroke

Glyconanoparticles may help reduce cell damage and inflammation after stroke

Materials resulting from chemical bonding of glucosamine, a type of sugar, with fullerenes, kind of nanoparticles known as buckyballs, might help to reduce cell damage and inflammation occurring after stroke. [More]
Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

Study: New gene therapy safe, effective for patients with hemophilia B

A multi-year, ongoing study suggests that a new kind of gene therapy for hemophilia B could be safe and effective for human patients. Published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the research showed that a reprogrammed retrovirus could successfully transfer new factor IX (clotting) genes into animals with hemophilia B to dramatically decrease spontaneous bleeding. [More]
Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

Penn researcher named a recipient of 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize

University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV expert Carl June, MD, has been named one of two recipients of the 2015 Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize for his outstanding work in cancer immunotherapy. Since 1952, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize has been awarded to scientists who have made great advancements in the fields in which Paul Ehrlich worked, in particular immunology, cancer research, microbiology, and chemotherapy. [More]
Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

Simple blood test could be developed to diagnose Alzheimer's disease, say UCLA researchers

UCLA researchers have provided the first evidence that a simple blood test could be developed to confirm the presence of beta amyloid proteins in the brain, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
Andor Neo sCMOS camera is perfect partner for correlative microscopy

Andor Neo sCMOS camera is perfect partner for correlative microscopy

CD44 is recognised as an important cell surface receptor involved in the adhesion of circulating leukocytes to endothelium, a process that is critical for their trafficking in the vasculature. Now, a Japanese group of researchers using an ultra-sensitive Andor Neo sCMOS camera in their correlative microscopy set-up has demonstrated that microvilli projections around the cell surface mediate this adhesion. [More]
Understanding the role of next generation sequencing in stratified cancer medicine

Understanding the role of next generation sequencing in stratified cancer medicine

Oxford Gene Technology, The Molecular Genetics Company, has teamed up with clinical research experts in a new article available online, discussing the role of next generation sequencing (NGS) in cancer medicine. [More]
Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling. [More]
Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Sanford-Burnham researchers discover control mechanism for glutamine uptake in breast cancer cells

Researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute have discovered a mechanism that explains why some breast cancer tumors respond to specific chemotherapies and others do not. The findings highlight the level of glutamine, an essential nutrient for cancer development, as a determinant of breast cancer response to select anticancer therapies, and identify a marker associated with glutamine uptake, for potential prognosis and stratification of breast cancer therapy. [More]
Regenstrief researchers create accurate system for tracking quality of colonoscopies

Regenstrief researchers create accurate system for tracking quality of colonoscopies

An accurate system for tracking the quality of colonoscopies and determining the appropriate intervals between these procedures could contribute to both better health outcomes and lower costs. Clinician-researchers from the Regenstrief Institute have created and tested such a system in the nation's first multiple institution colonoscopy quality measurement study utilizing natural language processing and report that it is as accurate but less expensive than human review. [More]
MDC scientists identify new molecular signaling pathway that regulates placental development

MDC scientists identify new molecular signaling pathway that regulates placental development

During pregnancy, the mother supplies the fetus with nutrients and oxygen via the placenta. If placental development is impaired, this may lead to growth disorders of the embryo or to life-threatening diseases of the mother such as preeclampsia, a serious condition involving high blood pressure and increased urinary protein excretion. [More]
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