Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Choroidal thickness reduced in diabetic macular oedema patients

Choroidal thickness reduced in diabetic macular oedema patients

Patients with diabetic macular oedema have smaller choroidal thickness measurements in affected and unaffected eyes compared with healthy individuals, spectral-domain optical coherence tomography imaging results reveal. [More]
Henry Ford physicians use AngioVac device to remove tumor in kidney cancer patient

Henry Ford physicians use AngioVac device to remove tumor in kidney cancer patient

Physicians at Henry Ford Hospital successfully suctioned a cancerous tumor from a major vein in a patient with metastatic kidney cancer, clearing the way for him to undergo a minimally-invasive kidney removal. [More]
Research provides new insights into rapid defence responses in human immune system

Research provides new insights into rapid defence responses in human immune system

Researchers have uncovered a sieve-like structure in lymph nodes that regulates the transport of proteins and migration of white blood cells into lymph nodes. [More]
Discovery provides new insights into rapid defence responses in the immune system

Discovery provides new insights into rapid defence responses in the immune system

Researchers have uncovered a sieve-like structure in lymph nodes that regulates the transport of proteins and migration of white blood cells into lymph nodes. The discovery, made by scientists working at the University of Turku, Finland, will provide new insights into rapid defence responses in the human immune system. The research was carried out with funding from the Academy of Finland and the Sigrid Juselius Foundation. [More]
Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

Andor Zyla sCMOS Camera enables instantaneous imaging of neuronal activity across whole organism for the first time

The speed, resolution and sensitivity of the Andor Zyla sCMOS camera has allowed the Vaziri research group in Vienna, Austria, to simultaneously image neuronal activity across an entire organism for the first time. [More]
Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Magnetizing biomolecules: an interview with Dr. Fred Whipple, AMSBIO

Nanoparticle technology was originally developed in the 1980s and 1990s. As the technology evolved, it soon became possible to produce uniform nanoscopic beads that are magnetic, and that also have a variety of specific surface chemistries. It was immediately evident that such beads could be used to great advantage for biochemical separations. [More]
GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx announces publication of positive validation study for Decipher Prostate Cancer Classifier

GenomeDx Biosciences today announced the publication of a positive validation study for the Decipher® Prostate Cancer Classifier, a genomic test for prostate cancer. The study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed that patients with low genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be optimally managed with observation after radical prostatectomy (prostate surgery), while those with high genomic risk (as determined by Decipher) may be better managed earlier with adjuvant radiotherapy. [More]
Drug similar to Gleevec may help tame some brain cancers

Drug similar to Gleevec may help tame some brain cancers

The drug Gleevec (imatinib mesylate) is well known not only for its effectiveness against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but also for the story behinds its development. The drug was specifically designed to target an abnormal molecule--a fusion of two normal cell proteins--that fueled a tumor's growth. [More]
Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

Scientists find that collagen 'cross-links' can determine tumor's ability to grow and spread

When skyscrapers go up, contractors rely on an infrastructure of steel beams and braces. Some cancers grow the same way, using a biological matrix from which the tumor can thrive and spread. [More]
Cancer researchers find important clues to why tumor cells become 'good' or 'bad'

Cancer researchers find important clues to why tumor cells become 'good' or 'bad'

For the first time, Keck Medicine of the University of Southern California cancer researchers have traced the origins of colorectal cancer cells, finding important clues to why tumor cells become "good" or "bad," with the potential of stopping them before they start. [More]
First patients treated with Orthocell's tendon repair therapy in Hong Kong

First patients treated with Orthocell's tendon repair therapy in Hong Kong

Regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited has announced it has expanded its presence in Asia with the first patients treated with its world-leading tendon repair therapy in Hong Kong. [More]
CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

CWRU researcher receives $3.9 million grant for HIV research

A researcher at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine has been awarded $3.9 million to determine if the combination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and drug abuse is a double kick in the gut, leading to organ damage throughout the body. [More]
Study shows preeclampsia and low birth weight reoccur in the next generation

Study shows preeclampsia and low birth weight reoccur in the next generation

In a study to be presented on Feb. 6 in an oral concurrent session at 1:15 p.m. PST, at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting™, in San Diego, researchers will present findings on a study of mothers and daughters where low birth weight and preeclampsia were found to reoccur in the next generation. [More]
Researchers report novel method for minimally invasive tissue ablation surgery

Researchers report novel method for minimally invasive tissue ablation surgery

A team of researchers that includes scientists from the Quinnipiac University and the University of California, Berkeley reports a new method for minimally invasive tissue ablation surgery that combines electrolysis with reversible electroporation. [More]
Groundbreaking study reveals potential dangers of ice hockey for young athletes

Groundbreaking study reveals potential dangers of ice hockey for young athletes

James Hudziak, M.D., has two children who love ice hockey. His son skates for his college team and one of his daughters plays in high school. [More]
Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Two researchers receive Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy

Recognized for their pioneering work in the development of gene transfer technology using retroviral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes into cells, Richard C. Mulligan, PhD, Director of the Harvard Gene Therapy Initiative, Harvard Institutes of Medicine, Boston, MA, and A. Dusty Miller, PhD, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, received the Pioneer Award from Human Gene Therapy, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. [More]
Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Researchers develop new MRI-based technique to better detect NAFLD in children

Between 5 and 8 million children in the United States have nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), yet most cases go undiagnosed. To help address this issue, researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based technique to help clinicians and researchers better detect and evaluate NAFLD in children. [More]
Second opinions can optimize outcomes and avoid needless expenses

Second opinions can optimize outcomes and avoid needless expenses

Mary Rockland was in a panic when she learned that she was diagnosed with invasive breast cancer. Like many patients, she trusted her doctor when he told her that a lump in her breast was cancerous, and relied on his judgment when he recommended a bilateral mastectomy. [More]
ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group opens clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed DCIS

In direct response to recommendations made by a National Institutes of Health scientific consensus panel, the ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group announced today the opening of E4112, a clinical trial for women with newly diagnosed ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) of the breast who, together with their doctors, will use the results of a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exam to determine whether to undergo a lumpectomy or a mastectomy. [More]
New study links cell communication pathway to common brain tumors found in children

New study links cell communication pathway to common brain tumors found in children

A new study by Johns Hopkins researchers links a well-known cell communication pathway called Notch to one of the most common -- but overall still rare -- brain tumors found in children. [More]