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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
UM SOM study identifies key Zika proteins as likely suspects for damage

UM SOM study identifies key Zika proteins as likely suspects for damage

Until it burst onto the scene earlier this year, Zika was an obscure, little-known virus. As a result, scientists know little about how it works. [More]
New active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer

New active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer

A new active pharmaceutical ingredient may help against severe forms of testicular cancer, which only respond inadequately to other therapies. [More]
Mutations linked to endometrial cancer can be detected in uterine lavage fluid, study reveals

Mutations linked to endometrial cancer can be detected in uterine lavage fluid, study reveals

Mutations that have been linked to endometrial cancer can be found in the uterine lavage fluid of pre- and post-menopausal women both with and without detectable cancer, according to a study published in PLOS Medicine by John Martignetti from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA, and colleagues. [More]
Whitehead Institute researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer drug-resistance

Whitehead Institute researchers identify mechanism underlying cancer drug-resistance

The use of proteasome inhibitors to treat cancer has been greatly limited by the ability of cancer cells to develop resistance to these drugs. [More]
CSHL researcher-inventor hails FDA approval of new SMA drug

CSHL researcher-inventor hails FDA approval of new SMA drug

Within a week of Christmas day, a drug called nusinersen will be in the hands of doctors across the nation, who will use it, most urgently, to treat young children with a severe and potentially fatal illness called spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). [More]
Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Hospitals eliminate bedsore occurrence using early detection technology

Using technology adapted from NASA's Mars lander as part of a large-scale bedsore reduction program, over half of the 13 participating hospitals were able to eliminate the occurrence of new bedsores completely; an additional 3 hospitals achieved reductions ranging from 11% to 90%. [More]
Tau biomarker could lead to early identification of Alzheimer's disease pathology

Tau biomarker could lead to early identification of Alzheimer's disease pathology

A discovery of high relevance in medical research will be published in Volume 55, number 4 of December 2016 of the prestigious "Journal of Alzheimer's Disease (JAD)", entitled "Tau Platelets Correlate with Regional Brain Atrophy in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease". [More]
Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Scientists discover link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of subthalamic nucleus

Northwestern Medicine scientists identified a link between Huntington's disease and dysfunction of the subthalamic nucleus, a component of the basal ganglia, a group of brain structures critical for movement and impulse control. [More]
Researcher develops new method to accurately identify elusive molecules

Researcher develops new method to accurately identify elusive molecules

Among the most important molecules in the living world are sugars or carbohydrates, which play a vital role in life processes. Sugars provide the main source of fuel for the body, protect muscles from damage and contribute to the immune response. [More]
Biomarker for oxidative stress plays key role in development of NAFLD, study shows

Biomarker for oxidative stress plays key role in development of NAFLD, study shows

Diet-related diseases like non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are known to have a major inflammatory component. [More]
Dual treatment strategies lengthen lives of mice with skin cancer

Dual treatment strategies lengthen lives of mice with skin cancer

By combining two treatment strategies, both aimed at boosting the immune system's killer T cells, Johns Hopkins researchers report they lengthened the lives of mice with skin cancer more than by using either strategy on its own. [More]
Research sheds new light on key drivers of cancer metastasis

Research sheds new light on key drivers of cancer metastasis

Latest research from New Zealand's University of Otago is shedding new light on why and how cancer cells spread from primary tumours to other parts of the body. This phenomenon - known as metastasis - causes about 90 per cent of all cancer deaths. [More]
Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Hormone receptor could be potential biomarker for gastric cancer, research shows

Scientists at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Miami, and Shantou University Medical College in China, have shown that the hormone receptor GHRH-R could be a potential biomarker for gastric cancer, enabling earlier diagnoses and better staging. [More]
New SWOG review shows vitamin E and selenium do not prevent colorectal adenomas

New SWOG review shows vitamin E and selenium do not prevent colorectal adenomas

Eight years ago, results from a landmark cancer prevention trial run by SWOG showed that a daily dose of vitamin E and selenium did not prevent prostate cancer. [More]
Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular NSAID use linked to increased risk of endometrial cancer mortality

Regular use of over-the-counter non-steroidal inflammatory drugs such as aspirin and ibuprofen is associated with an increased risk of dying in patients diagnosed with Type 1 endometrial cancers, according to a new population-based study led by The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute. [More]
Combination therapy holds great promise to clear precancerous skin lesions

Combination therapy holds great promise to clear precancerous skin lesions

A combination of two FDA-approved drugs - a topical chemotherapy and an immune-system-activating compound - was able to rapidly clear actinic keratosis lesions from patients participating in a clinical trial. [More]
Scientists identify novel protein pathway across cancer types that fuels tumor progression

Scientists identify novel protein pathway across cancer types that fuels tumor progression

Scientists at The Wistar Institute have identified a novel protein pathway across several types of cancer that controls how tumor cells acquire the energy necessary for movement, invasion and metastasis. [More]
AMP publishes joint guidelines for interpretation, reporting of sequence variants in cancer

AMP publishes joint guidelines for interpretation, reporting of sequence variants in cancer

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, non-profit molecular diagnostics professional society, today published guideline recommendations for both clinical laboratory professionals and oncologists that assess the status of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based cancer tests and establish standardized classification, annotation, interpretation, and reporting conventions for somatic sequence variants. [More]
Penn researchers pinpoint some effective HIV drugs in causing neuronal damage

Penn researchers pinpoint some effective HIV drugs in causing neuronal damage

Antiretroviral drugs have been life-changing therapies for HIV patients, but they can have significant side effects. [More]
Study suggests revolutionary way to make cancer cells more susceptible to existing chemotherapies

Study suggests revolutionary way to make cancer cells more susceptible to existing chemotherapies

The same signal that drives aggressive growth in a deadly cancer cell type also triggers coping mechanisms that make it "notoriously" hard to kill, according to a study published online December 15 in Cell. When stressed, this cell type - far more than most cancer cells - encases its genetic messages in protein globs called "stress granules" that lessen the effect of chemotherapies. [More]
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