Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

New mouse model to aid in development of antiviral compounds, vaccines against Zika virus

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine have developed one of the first mouse models for the study of Zika virus. The model will allow researchers to better understand how the virus causes disease and aid in the development of antiviral compounds and vaccines. [More]
Researchers develop new mathematical model to evaluate best treatment protocol to clear infection

Researchers develop new mathematical model to evaluate best treatment protocol to clear infection

Antibiotic resistance is one of the most challenging problems in modern medicine. A new study by Erida Gjini and Patricia H. Brito from the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, provides a new mathematical model to evaluate the best treatment protocol to clear an infection, by taking into account the role of the host immune system. [More]
Well-established optics technique can locate brain tumors within a minute compared to conventional methods

Well-established optics technique can locate brain tumors within a minute compared to conventional methods

When operating on cancer, surgeons want to remove tumors and not healthy tissue. This is especially important and challenging when dealing with brain tumors, which are often spread out and mixed in with the healthy tissue. Now, researchers have shown that a well-established optics technique can reveal exactly where brain tumors are, producing images in less than a minute -- unlike conventional methods that can take a whole day. [More]
OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

OASIS study to investigate link between SIDS and alteration on newborn hearing screen test

Seattle Children's is partnering on the launch of a study called the 'Oto-Acoustic Signals in SIDS'study that will investigate a possible association between Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and hearing alteration on the newborn hearing screen test. [More]
Researchers find way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape effects of cancer drugs

Researchers find way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape effects of cancer drugs

Cancer cells often devise ways to survive even in the presence of toxic chemotherapy. Now, a research team led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center has found a way to attack a process that tumor cells use to escape the effects of standard cancer drugs. The discovery is published online today in the journal Nature Cell Biology. [More]
MR may detect earliest Alzheimer's brain changes

MR may detect earliest Alzheimer's brain changes

Levels of the brain metabolite and neuroinflammation marker myo-inositol are elevated in asymptomatic patients with abnormal Alzheimer's disease (AD) biomarkers, say researchers. As repo ... [More]
UA researchers developing new treatment to delay serious consequences of venomous snakebites

UA researchers developing new treatment to delay serious consequences of venomous snakebites

Time is of the essence for treating venomous snakebites, and a product being developed by researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine - Tucson may extend that window for treatment. [More]
Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Intestinal bacteria can be used to reduce cancer risk, reveals UCLA study

Researchers have shown that various types of intestinal bacteria might be factors in both causing and preventing obesity, and in other conditions and diseases. Now, a UCLA study suggests that it could also potentially be used to reduce the risk for some types of cancer. [More]
International panel reclassifies a type of thyroid tumor to reduce cancer overdiagnosis

International panel reclassifies a type of thyroid tumor to reduce cancer overdiagnosis

Led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, an international panel of pathologists and clinicians has reclassified a type of thyroid cancer to reflect that it is noninvasive and has a low risk of recurrence. The name change, described today in JAMA Oncology, is expected to reduce the psychological and medical consequences of a cancer diagnosis, potentially affecting thousands of people worldwide. [More]
Alzheimer's preclinical staging criteria supported

Alzheimer's preclinical staging criteria supported

The Alzheimer's disease preclinical staging criteria proposed by the National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer's Association appear to be valid over more than a decade of follow-up, say researchers. [More]
Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

Johns Hopkins study suggests updated universal screening for hepatitis C virus

A review of blood samples for nearly 5,000 patients seen at The Johns Hopkins Hospital Emergency Department suggests that federal guidelines for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening may be missing up to a quarter of all cases and argues for updated universal screening. [More]
International scientists discuss new treatments for non small cell lung cancer

International scientists discuss new treatments for non small cell lung cancer

More than 30 prominent international scientists gathered to discuss the state-of-the-art, as well as promising future approaches for the treatment of lung cancer at the stunning 17th century Borgo San Luigi, in Monteriggion, in the heart of the Tuscany countryside. [More]
BMI Healthcare innovates in cancer services technology

BMI Healthcare innovates in cancer services technology

Representing excellence and innovation in the field of healthcare, BMI Healthcare has been shortlisted as a finalist in the IT Innovator of the Year category of this year’s HealthInvestor Awards. [More]
Biopsy of submandibular gland can help identify pathology of Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies

Biopsy of submandibular gland can help identify pathology of Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies

Accurate diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, and the related disease "dementia with Lewy bodies," can be difficult in the early stages of both conditions. While brain biopsies can be more accurate, the risk of complications has been considered too high. New research published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease indicates that a biopsy of the submandibular gland can help identify the same pathology that is seen in the brain, providing some of the increased accuracy of brain biopsy, but not the increased risk. [More]
Cell-signaling protein holds key to understanding autoantibody formation in lupus patients

Cell-signaling protein holds key to understanding autoantibody formation in lupus patients

A signaling molecule called interferon gamma could hold the key to understanding how harmful autoantibodies form in lupus patients. The finding could lead to new treatments for the chronic autoimmune disease, said researchers at Penn State College of Medicine. [More]
Combination of genetic, environmental risk factors can trigger fatal eating disorder in humans

Combination of genetic, environmental risk factors can trigger fatal eating disorder in humans

In a new study, researchers from Columbia University Medical Center described a new mouse model featuring a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors that can trigger the compulsive restriction of food intake seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. The findings may help to identify new prevention and treatment strategies for the eating disorder in humans. [More]
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Genetically modified pig hearts can survive for more than 2 years after transplantation into baboons

Genetically modified pig hearts can survive for more than 2 years after transplantation into baboons

Could organs explanted from other mammals save human lives someday? A new study shows that genetically modified pig hearts developed by US and Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers can survive for more than up to 2½ years when transplanted into baboons. [More]
Radiation therapy plus PCV chemotherapy improves survival of low-grade glioma patients

Radiation therapy plus PCV chemotherapy improves survival of low-grade glioma patients

Patients with a low-grade type of brain tumor called glioma who received radiation therapy plus a chemotherapy regimen, including procarbazine, lomustine and vincristine (PCV), experienced a longer progression-free survival and overall survival than patients who received radiation therapy alone, according to the results of the clinical trial, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9802 published in the April 7 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Person's age, mobility could be powerful predictors of survival than certain biomarkers

Advances in technology allow scientists to measure intricate details about the human body that greatly enhance understanding of health, disease and aging. [More]
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