Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Patients sent for unnecessary blood tests before low-risk surgical procedures

Depending on which hospital you go to for your low-risk surgical procedure, you may be 2.4 times more or less likely to be sent for unnecessary blood tests. This is among the findings of a study conducted by researchers from the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences and the Women's College Hospital Institute for Health Systems Solutions and Virtual Care. [More]
Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Genetic mutations could help explain cause of cancer in pediatric patients

Combined whole exome tumor and blood sequencing in pediatric cancer patients revealed mutations that could help explain the cause of cancer or have the potential to impact clinical cancer care in 40 percent of patients in a study led by researchers from Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Cancer Center. [More]
Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

Study provides detailed new information about diffuse glioma

An international collaborative study has revealed detailed new information about diffuse glioma, the most common type of tumor found in some 80 percent of adult brain cancer patients, raising hopes that better understanding of these disease groups may aid improved clinical outcomes. [More]
Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Brain-derived neurotrophic factor linked to slower cognitive decline in older people

Older people with higher amounts of a key protein in their brains also had slower decline in their memory and thinking abilities than people with lower amounts of protein from the gene called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, according to a study published in the January 27, 2016, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [More]
Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Study shows prevalence of clinically relevant depressive symptoms among Division I college athletes

Nearly a quarter of Division I college athletes reported depressive symptoms while enrolled at a liberal arts university on the East Coast, says a new study published in the February issue of the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Women were almost two times more likely to experience symptoms than their male peers. [More]
Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Newly drafted consensus statement promotes widespread use of HPV vaccines to prevent cancer

Leaders of several cancer centers designated by the National Cancer Institute have united to support human papillomavirus vaccination. Among them is Cheryl Willman, MD, Director and CEO of the University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center. [More]
CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

CUMC, Iowa scientists use CRISPR to repair genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa

Columbia University Medical Center and University of Iowa scientists have used a new gene-editing technology called CRISPR, to repair a genetic mutation responsible for retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited condition that causes the retina to degrade and leads to blindness in at least 1.5 million cases worldwide. [More]
Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Using centrifugal elutriation and flow cytometry to answer biological questions: an interview with Peter Lopez

Flow Cytometry, the measurement of various cellular characteristics as they flow through a measuring apparatus, has so many applications that it's hard to know where to begin. [More]
Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

Nutrition and breast cancer; starving triple negative breast cancer cells to death: an interview with Associate Professor Jeff Holst

While there are a range of reports that different foods and food groups can increase or decrease your risk of cancer, these associations are very difficult to scientifically verify. [More]
Researchers identify three single-driver genetic alterations that occur in neuroepithelial tumors

Researchers identify three single-driver genetic alterations that occur in neuroepithelial tumors

The St. Jude Children's Research Hospital – Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project (PCGP) has identified critical driver genes that account for disease-related alterations in a range of uncommon low-grade neuroepithelial tumors. [More]
Using acidity to detect cancer

Using acidity to detect cancer

Normally, tissues demonstrate a slightly acidic intracellular pH (pHi) and slightly alkaline extracellular pH (pHe). However, proliferating tissues demonstrate transient pH Gradient Reversal i.e. alkalinization of pHi and acidification of pHe. [More]
Orthocell to present positive data from pilot study of tendon cell treatment at international hip meeting

Orthocell to present positive data from pilot study of tendon cell treatment at international hip meeting

Regenerative medicine company Orthocell Limited is pleased to announce it will present new positive two year data from a study of its tendon cell treatment for degenerate hip (gluteal) tendons at the 3rd Melbourne International Hip Arthroscopy meeting. [More]
UT Southwestern researchers reveal how CDK4/6-inhibitors alter pancreatic cancer cell metabolism

UT Southwestern researchers reveal how CDK4/6-inhibitors alter pancreatic cancer cell metabolism

UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found that cancer drugs known as CDK4/6-inhibitors alter the metabolism of pancreatic cancer cells, revealing a biologic vulnerability that could be exploited for therapeutic gain. [More]
New study identifies DKK3 as a driver of kidney fibrosis

New study identifies DKK3 as a driver of kidney fibrosis

Chronic kidney disease can develop in response to a variety of insults and is characterized by progressive renal fibrosis and atrophy of kidney tubule. Therapeutic options are limited and the disease is often not detected until later stages. [More]
Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia accelerating development of neurometabolic treatments for concussions

Oxeia Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., a biotechnology company, is catalyzing the development of first-in-class neurometabolic treatments for concussions and other aspects of brain injury. [More]
Gene therapy holds considerable potential for safe, effective treatment of people with factor VII deficiency

Gene therapy holds considerable potential for safe, effective treatment of people with factor VII deficiency

Hematology researchers have used a single injection of gene therapy to correct a rare bleeding disorder, factor VII deficiency, in dogs. This success in large animals holds considerable potential for a safe, effective and long-lasting new treatment in humans with the same bleeding disorder. [More]
CSU's BioMARC awarded DoD contract to help develop new vaccines to combat encephalitic viruses

CSU's BioMARC awarded DoD contract to help develop new vaccines to combat encephalitic viruses

Colorado State University's Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing and Academic Resource Center has been awarded a 10-month, $4.6 million contract funded by the Department of Defense to help develop and manufacture new vaccines to fight encephalitic viruses that cause inflammation of the brain. [More]
Study outlines new model to help predict age-related response to hepatitis B vaccine

Study outlines new model to help predict age-related response to hepatitis B vaccine

Physicians have known for years that patients respond differently to vaccines as they age. There may soon be a new way to predict and enhance the effectiveness of vaccinations, in particular the hepatitis B vaccine. [More]
Novel gene therapy treatment proves safe, effective for factor VII deficiency

Novel gene therapy treatment proves safe, effective for factor VII deficiency

A single injection. That's all someone with a factor VII deficiency would need for a life-long cure, thanks to a new gene therapy treatment developed in a collaboration of researchers at the University of North Carolina and The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. [More]
Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

Scientists reveal why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis worsens in obese people

In results published on October 19, 2015 in the Journal of Lipid Research, a team of translational scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina report a new reason why non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) worsens in people who are obese. [More]
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