Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

Endothelin gene expression linked to vision loss in premature babies

A gene known to play a major role in constricting blood vessels also appears to be a major player in the aberrant blood vessel growth that can destroy the vision of premature babies. [More]
MicroMatrices, Advanced Cell Diagnostics sign preferred partnership agreement

MicroMatrices, Advanced Cell Diagnostics sign preferred partnership agreement

MicroMatrices, a service provider specialised in high resolution cell type-specific analysis to characterise toxicological responses in different cell types in tissue, today announced a preferred partnership agreement with Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc., a leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools. [More]
Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's starts patient enrollment for immunotherapy clinical trial for neuroblastoma

Seattle Children's today announced the opening of patient enrollment for its new cellular immunotherapy clinical research trial designed to induce remission in children suffering from neuroblastoma, one of the deadliest forms of childhood cancer. [More]
OGT workshop to focus on using latest genomic technologies for accelerating cancer research

OGT workshop to focus on using latest genomic technologies for accelerating cancer research

Oxford Gene Technology, The Molecular Genetics Company, will present a workshop titled ‘An Integrated Genomic Approach to Tumor Profiling’ at the Association for Molecular Pathology annual meeting on the 12-15th November at National Harbor, MD. [More]
Study provides answers regarding scientific controversies about brain anatomy in autism research

Study provides answers regarding scientific controversies about brain anatomy in autism research

In the largest MRI study to date, researchers from Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and Carnegie Mellon University have shown that the brain anatomy in MRI scans of people with autism above age six is mostly indistinguishable from that of typically developing individuals and, therefore, of little clinical or scientific value. [More]
Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Study looks at new diagnostic, treatment approaches to neurological conditions

Despite great advances in understanding how the human brain works, psychiatric conditions, neurodegenerative disorders, and brain injuries are on the rise. Progress in the development of new diagnostic and treatment approaches appears to have stalled. In a special issue of the Cell Press journal Neuron, experts look at the challenges associated with "translational neuroscience," or efforts to bring advances in the lab to the patients who need them. [More]
New correlation found between specific molecular features of CLL and patients with different prognosis

New correlation found between specific molecular features of CLL and patients with different prognosis

If chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with a good or poor prognosis could be identified already at the time of diagnosis, physicians would have better possibilities to adjust their therapeutic and follow-up strategies. Now researchers at Uppsala University, together with international colleagues, have discovered a new correlation between specific molecular features of the disease and subgroups of patients with different prognosis. [More]
Asthma patients using behavioral therapy can improve lung health over the long-term

Asthma patients using behavioral therapy can improve lung health over the long-term

Asthma patients taught to habitually resist the urge to take deep breaths when experiencing symptoms were rewarded with fewer symptoms and healthier lung function, according to a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas. [More]
UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

UCLA study: Asthma harms more than just the lungs, may be more harmful than previously thought

Asthma may be more harmful than was previously thought, according to UCLA researchers who found that genetic damage is present in circulating, or peripheral, blood. Doctors previously thought that the genetic damage it caused was limited to the lungs. [More]
Loyola study finds radiation as a risk factor for young people with meningioma

Loyola study finds radiation as a risk factor for young people with meningioma

In people under age 30, radiation is a risk factor for a type of brain tumor called a meningioma, a Loyola University Medical Center study has found. [More]
Researchers make significant advancement in early diagnosis of invasive cancers

Researchers make significant advancement in early diagnosis of invasive cancers

A team of researchers from Inserm led by Paul Hofman (Inserm Unit 1081/University of Nice) has just made a significant advance in the area of early diagnosis of invasive cancers. In a study which has just been published in the journal PLOS ONE, the team shows that it is possible to detect, in patients at risk of developing lung cancer, early signs, in the form of circulating cancer cells, several months, and in some cases several years, before the cancer becomes detectable by CT scanning. [More]
NSAIDs protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells

NSAIDs protect against colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells

Aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) protect against the development of colorectal cancer by inducing cell suicide pathways in intestinal stem cells that carry a certain mutated and dysfunctional gene, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and the School of Medicine. [More]
Sigma-Aldrich acquires Cell Marque

Sigma-Aldrich acquires Cell Marque

Sigma-Aldrich Corporation, a leading Life Science and High Technology company, announced it has completed its acquisition of Rocklin, California based Cell Marque Corporation, an industry-leading provider of in vitro diagnostic (IVD) antibody reagents and kits. The Company expects this acquisition to be neutral to mildly accretive to earnings per share in 2015. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed. [More]
Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Advanced Cell Diagnostics names Aquila-Histoplex as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe

Aquila-Histoplex, a contract research organisation specialised in histological and multiplex staining technologies, was today announced as the first accredited RNAscope® Certified Service Provider in Europe by Advanced Cell Diagnostics, Inc. (ACD), a technology and market leader in the field of molecular pathology and developer of cell and tissue-based analysis tools. [More]
New research sheds light on future efforts to eradicate HIV from the body in human patients

New research sheds light on future efforts to eradicate HIV from the body in human patients

Where does HIV hide? Antiretroviral drugs can usually control the virus, but can't completely eliminate it. So any strategy to eradicate HIV from the body has to take into account not only the main group of immune cells the virus targets, called CD4 or helper T cells, but other infected cells as well. [More]
Study compares five-year DFS and OS rates for patients with AIS and MIA

Study compares five-year DFS and OS rates for patients with AIS and MIA

Lung cancer patients with minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) have similar, positive five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates as patients with adenocarcinoma in-situ (AIS), according to research presented today at the 2014 Chicago Multidisciplinary Symposium in Thoracic Oncology. [More]
KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

KU researchers find potential therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer

A team at the University of Kansas School of Medicine has identified a potential target for treating breast cancer, including a particularly deadly form of the disease. [More]
New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

New study pinpoints complex genetic origins for autoimmune diseases

Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans — ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma — mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Now, a new study pinpoints the complex genetic origins for many of these diseases, a discovery that may lead to better diagnosis and ultimately to improved treatments. [More]
UBC researchers set to develop universal antidote to simplify use of heparin

UBC researchers set to develop universal antidote to simplify use of heparin

Heparin, the life saving blood thinner used in major surgeries and treatment of heart diseases, is a complicated drug but a research team from the University of British Columbia has set out to make its use a lot safer by developing a universal antidote. [More]
Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Same cell type can give rise to different gliomas

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. [More]