Pathology News and Research RSS Feed - Pathology News and Research

Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

Novel method can test multi-drug resistant bacteria’s susceptibility to antibiotics in clinical setting

The recent emergence of bacterial infections that are resistant to many existing antibiotics is driving an urgent need for tools to quickly identify the small number of therapies that are still effective for individual patients. [More]
Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

Researches create mini-brain model of idiopathic ASD characterized by early neuronal overgrowth

The vast majority of cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are idiopathic - the cause is unknown. [More]
Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

Researchers find immune system directly affects, controls social behavior

In a startling discovery that raises fundamental questions about human behavior, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have determined that the immune system directly affects - and even controls - creatures' social behavior, such as their desire to interact with others. [More]
UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

UNC professor identifies research priorities to address VTE in cancer patients

More than 20 percent of all blood clots in veins occur in cancer patients. These clots, also known as venous thromboembolism (VTE), pose serious threats for cancer patients. [More]
Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

Two new studies find potential genetic cause and new treatment method for autoimmune diseases

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association, Inc. is spotlighting two new research studies originally reported in ScienceDaily. [More]
Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants may help treat home and hospital-acquired scourge

Fecal transplants are increasingly being used as the treatment of last resort for certain infections in the human gut and have had remarkable success treating the nursing home and hospital-acquired scourge, Clostridium difficile colitis, an infectious diarrhea that often follows antibiotic treatment. [More]
Beagle Freedom Project to award $250,000 in grants to replace animals in experiments

Beagle Freedom Project to award $250,000 in grants to replace animals in experiments

Beagle Freedom Project, a national nonprofit based in Los Angeles, is continuing its mission to further reduce and replace animals in cruel experiences, because it believes that medical research can no longer rely on the use of these animals in controversial experiments. [More]
CNIO study shows proinflammatory molecule IL-17A can be key factor in development of NASH and HCC

CNIO study shows proinflammatory molecule IL-17A can be key factor in development of NASH and HCC

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a serious hepatic condition that precedes hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and is currently untreatable. [More]
New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

New study suggests potential role for gut microbiota in diabetes remission after bypass surgery

Studies have shown that bariatric surgery can lead to remission of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in rodents and humans, but this beneficial effect cannot be explained solely by weight loss. [More]
Researchers to develop new test to predict therapy for women with ER+ breast cancer

Researchers to develop new test to predict therapy for women with ER+ breast cancer

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are teaming with industry and other academics to develop a quick and inexpensive test to predict which women with ER+ breast cancer need chemotherapy and which need only the more tolerable hormonal therapy. [More]
Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Five-year NIH grant awarded to four NYC medical centers for PMI Cohort Program

Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medicine, in collaboration with NewYork-Presbyterian and NYC Health + Hospitals/Harlem, have been awarded a grant from the NIH for approximately $4 million in fiscal year 2016 to enroll participants in the Cohort Program of President Barack Obama's Precision Medicine Initiative (PMI)—a large-scale research effort to improve our ability to prevent and treat disease based on individual differences in lifestyle, environment and genetics. [More]
AMP looks forward to working with FDA to determine optimal approach to regulating NGS tests

AMP looks forward to working with FDA to determine optimal approach to regulating NGS tests

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostic professionals, today announced that it looks forward to working with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to determine the best adaptive approach to regulating Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) tests. [More]
Study finds microRNA let-7 plays key role in restricting neuroblastoma

Study finds microRNA let-7 plays key role in restricting neuroblastoma

Great strides have been made in treating neuroblastoma, the most common cancer in infants and toddlers. However, advanced cases are often fatal, and children who survive often face life-long physical and intellectual challenges related to their treatment. [More]
Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

Study results pave way to development of effective human vaccine against HIV

A new scientific study conducted by a team of leading AIDS scientists reveal results that lead the way to the development of an effective human vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). [More]
MGH researchers discover how obesity increases inflammation, desmoplasia in PDAC patients

MGH researchers discover how obesity increases inflammation, desmoplasia in PDAC patients

Massachusetts General Hospital investigators have discovered the mechanism by which obesity increases inflammation and desmoplasia - an accumulation of connective tissue - in the most common form of pancreatic cancer. [More]
Inherited mutations in DNA repair genes may predispose to metastatic prostate cancer

Inherited mutations in DNA repair genes may predispose to metastatic prostate cancer

Inherited mutations in genes that function to repair DNA may contribute to metastatic prostate cancer more than previously recognized, according to a study out today in the New England Journal of Medicine. [More]
Hippocampal inflammation linked to depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis

Hippocampal inflammation linked to depressive symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis

Patients with multiple sclerosis have higher rates of depression than the general population, including people with other life-long disabling diseases. Symptoms of multiple sclerosis arise from an abnormal response of the body's immune system. [More]
New ESMO guidelines reflect personalized approach for management of metastatic colorectal cancer

New ESMO guidelines reflect personalized approach for management of metastatic colorectal cancer

ESMO, the leading European professional organisation for medical oncology, has released new consensus guidelines for the management of metastatic colorectal cancer that reflect an increasingly personalized approach to treatment, as published online today in Annals of Oncology. [More]
Changes in benign tissue adjacent to prostate tumors could better predict recurrence

Changes in benign tissue adjacent to prostate tumors could better predict recurrence

Changes in benign tissues next to prostate tumors may provide an early warning for patients at higher risk for biochemical recurrence after a radical prostatectomy, a study by researchers at Case Western Reserve University and Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions shows. [More]
Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Diabetes drug metformin could help reduce toxic acid levels linked to MSUD

Maple Syrup Urine Disease (MSUD) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder involving the dysfunction of an enzyme which breaks down three essential amino acids: leucine, isoleucine and valine. [More]
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