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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
RBD persists in Parkinson’s disease patients

RBD persists in Parkinson’s disease patients

Symptoms of rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) are unlikely to resolve in patients with Parkinson’s disease, show the findings of a 3-year study. [More]
Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

Gynecologic oncologist awarded grant to improve quality of life for women with endometrial cancer

The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Board of Governors recently awarded more than $2.7 million in contracted funding to Katina Robison, MD, a gynecologic oncologist with the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, for the study "Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Stress Incontinence." [More]
Zetz Family PCRF, Johns Hopkins Medicine partner for pancreatic cancer research

Zetz Family PCRF, Johns Hopkins Medicine partner for pancreatic cancer research

According to a study done by the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network and published by the Cancer Research Journal, early detection for Pancreatic Cancer is particularly important because it is known as the "silent killer", by the time symptoms appear it is usually too late and is known to have a very low survival rate of 7% over 5 years. [More]
Study shows that periodontal treatment can reduce symptoms of prostatitis

Study shows that periodontal treatment can reduce symptoms of prostatitis

Treating gum disease reduced symptoms of prostate inflammation, called prostatitis, report researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center. [More]
Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Ground-breaking study characterizes early-stage Alzheimer's abnormalities in the intact brain

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative condition that strikes at the heart of what makes us human: the ability to think, to feel, to remember and to communicate with those around us. The tragedy is compounded by the fact that there is currently no cure, no treatment, and no diagnostic method capable of identifying Alzheimer's at its early stages. [More]
Novel combination therapy shows promise in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer

Novel combination therapy shows promise in mouse models of advanced prostate cancer

Chemotherapy can be very effective against small prostate tumors. Larger prostate tumors, however, accumulate cells that suppress the body's immune response, allowing the cancer to grow despite treatment. [More]
Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Long-term survivors of esophageal cancer still face continued risks, study finds

Patients with esophageal cancer who survive 5 years after undergoing surgery might breathe a sigh of relief and become complacent about continued monitoring. In fact, there is little published information on the outcome of patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (LAEC) who survive beyond the 5-year mark. [More]
Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Lung volume reduction surgery could improve lung function in emphysema patients

Emphysema is a chronic, progressive, obstructive lung disease in which the small sacs of the lung (alveoli) are destroyed, leading to air pockets and severe breathing difficulties. In 2011, 4.7 million Americans reported being diagnosed with emphysema, and in 2013 more than 8200 patients died from emphysema. [More]
McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

McMaster researchers explore how surgeon's experience influences choice of surgery for patients

Researchers at McMaster University (Hamilton, ON) explored whether a surgeon's expertise influences procedural choice. The results of a new study of more than 8000 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing surgical resection by 124 physicians showed that surgeons who perform more surgeries are less likely to perform high-risk pneumonectomies. Christian J. Finley, MD, MPH, will be presenting the results of this research at the 95th AATS Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA on April 28, 2015. [More]
Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Innovative, active post-discharge intervention program benefits thoracic surgery patients

Post-surgical hospital readmission after discharge and repeat emergency room (ER) visits are not unusual for patients who have undergone major thoracic surgery. Recognizing this problem, clinicians at McMaster University have implemented an innovative, active post-discharge intervention for thoracic surgery patients that is based on the principle of a "one team-one approach" that is initiated while the patient is still hospitalized. [More]
Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

Lung cancer surgery patients at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism

New evidence suggests that lung cancer surgery patients are at higher risk of developing venous thromboembolism, including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), than previously thought, with elevated risks of complications or death. When thromboemboli occur, they may be asymptomatic or attributed to post-surgical pain or complications, and may reflect both the lung cancer itself as well as compromised lung function after surgery. [More]
Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

Men undergoing circumcision may be at increased risk of infecting female partners with HIV

In the midst of an international campaign to slow the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, the World Health Organization recommends male circumcision (the surgical removal of foreskin from the penis) which reduces HIV acquisition by 50-60%. [More]
Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

Young age and small body weight predispose pediatric CHD patients toward re-intervention

A retrospective review of 633 adults and children who underwent bioprosthetic pulmonary valve replacement (PVR) for congenital heart disease between 1996 and 2014 indicated that the risk of re-intervention was five times greater for children than adults, with the likelihood of re-intervention decreasing by 10% for each increasing year of age at surgery. [More]
Special issue of Gastroenterology highlights how food impacts health and disease

Special issue of Gastroenterology highlights how food impacts health and disease

Patients are always interested in understanding what they should eat and how it will impact their health. Physicians are just as interested in advancing their understanding of the major health effects of foods and food-related diseases. [More]
NeoGenomics' revenue increases 27% to $23.0 million in first quarter 2015

NeoGenomics' revenue increases 27% to $23.0 million in first quarter 2015

NeoGenomics, Inc., a leading provider of cancer-focused genetic testing services today reported its results for the first quarter of 2015. [More]
PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML signs collaborative agreement with Axela

PAML announced today that the laboratory has entered into a collaborative agreement with Axela, Inc. to develop multiplex assays focused on immune status for vaccine preventable diseases. PAML is one of the nation's leading medical reference laboratories, and Axela focuses on multiplexed nucleic acid and protein analysis for clinical diagnostics. [More]
Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Researchers identify molecular switch for protein that causes HER2-positive breast cancer

Herceptin has been touted as a wonder drug for women with HER2-positive breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is fueled by excess production of the HER2 protein. However, not all of these patients respond to the drug, and many who do respond eventually acquire resistance. [More]
Elekta introduces new Leksell Gamma Knife Icon to treat patients with brain disease

Elekta introduces new Leksell Gamma Knife Icon to treat patients with brain disease

With the introduction of Elekta's new Leksell Gamma Knife Icon, the benefits of precision cranial radiosurgery are now available for more patients with a wider variety of tumor types and sizes. [More]
Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Study: Long-term exposure to air pollution can damage brain structures, impair cognitive function

Air pollution, even at moderate levels, has long been recognized as a factor in raising the risk of stroke. A new study led by scientists from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Boston University School of Medicine suggests that long-term exposure can cause damage to brain structures and impair cognitive function in middle-aged and older adults. [More]
AMP report provides overview of current research on minimally invasive 'liquid biopsy' approaches

AMP report provides overview of current research on minimally invasive 'liquid biopsy' approaches

The Association for Molecular Pathology, the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostic professionals, today published a special article in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics titled, "Do Circulating Tumor Cells, Exosomes, and Circulating Tumor Nucleic Acids Have Clinical Utility?" The report provides a thorough overview of research to-date on the minimally invasive "liquid biopsy" approaches to cancer diagnostics. [More]
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