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Pathology is the study and diagnosis of disease through examination of organs, tissues, bodily fluids, and whole bodies (autopsies). The term also encompasses the related scientific study of disease processes, called General pathology.

Medical pathology is divided in two main branches, Anatomical pathology and Clinical pathology. Veterinary pathology is concerned with animal disease whereas Phytopathology is the study of plant diseases.
Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

Study could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer

William M. Sikov, a medical oncologist in the Breast Health Center and associate director for clinical research in the Program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, served as study chair and lead author for a recently-published major national study that could lead to improvements in outcomes for women with triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that disproportionately affects younger women. [More]
Researchers make important progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor

Researchers make important progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and the Gill Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children's Medical Center, Dallas, have made significant progress in defining new genetic causes of Wilms tumor, a type of kidney cancer found only in children. [More]
Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Case Western Reserve scientists discover leaky gut as source of non-AIDS complications

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is no longer a fatal condition, thanks to newer medications inhibiting the retrovirus, but a puzzling phenomenon has surfaced among these patients — non-AIDS complications. Scientists at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have resolved the mystery with their discovery of the leaky gut as the offender. [More]
Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

Research for better understanding of pathology of severe form of dwarfism

A better understanding of the pathology of a severe form of dwarfism as well as a possible window of treatment have been discovered by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). [More]
Scientists identify genetic mutations in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

Scientists identify genetic mutations in endometrioid endometrial carcinoma

Parents of twins often tell them apart through subtle differences such as facial expression, moles, voice tone and gait. Similarly, physicians treating women with endometrial cancer must be able to distinguish between different versions of this disease form that, on the surface, appear the same. [More]
New data confirms that mechanical heart valves raise risks during and after pregnancy

New data confirms that mechanical heart valves raise risks during and after pregnancy

The fact that mechanical heart valves increase risks during and after pregnancy, has been confirmed by data from the ROPAC registry presented for the first time today in an ESC Congress Hot Line session by Professor Jolien W. Roos-Hesselink, co-chair with Professor Roger Hall of the registry's executive committee. [More]
Decision tool set to improve management of low back pain

Decision tool set to improve management of low back pain

Experts have developed an evidence-based tool to help doctors in secondary and tertiary care decide how best to manage patients with chronic low back pain, a condition with the highest societal burden in Western Europe. [More]
Pixcelldata, eX-Path announce major new deal in advance of ECP 2014

Pixcelldata, eX-Path announce major new deal in advance of ECP 2014

Pixcelldata, the innovative Irish developer of digital pathology management and collaboration software has announced a major new deal with Dutch based eX-Path, global providers of tele-pathology services, founded by renowned pathology expert, Dr. Marius Nap. [More]
HSP90 suggested as potential therapeutic target in PD

HSP90 suggested as potential therapeutic target in PD

Heat shock protein (HSP90) has been suggested to be involved in neuronal protein misfolding and accumulation in Parkinson's disease (PD) brains leading to dopaminergic neuronal death and the eventual dopamine depletion. [More]
THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

THC may slow or halt progression of Alzheimer's disease

Extremely low levels of the compound in marijuana known as delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, may slow or halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease, a recent study from neuroscientists at the University of South Florida shows. [More]
Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias receives clearance from FDA to initiate Phase 1/2a clinical trial of AST-OPC1

Asterias Biotherapeutics Inc. has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to initiate a Phase 1/2a clinical trial of its product, AST-OPC1, in patients with complete cervical spinal cord injury. [More]
Penn receives orphan status in Europe for treatment of PNH

Penn receives orphan status in Europe for treatment of PNH

A Penn Medicine-developed drug has received orphan status in Europe this week for the treatment of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), a rare, life-threatening disease that causes anemia due to destruction of red blood cells and thrombosis. [More]
Pathologists help determine prostate cancer patient’s eligibility for active surveillance

Pathologists help determine prostate cancer patient’s eligibility for active surveillance

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Active surveillance offers low-risk prostate cancer patients a means to avoid the potentially harmful side effects from treatment. [More]
Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

Repurposing anti-depressant medication to target new pathway may help combat medulloblastoma

An international research team reports in Nature Medicine a novel molecular pathway that causes an aggressive form of medulloblastoma, and suggests repurposing an anti-depressant medication to target the new pathway may help combat one of the most common brain cancers in children. [More]
Researchers find why certain glioblastomas become drug resistance

Researchers find why certain glioblastomas become drug resistance

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have found one of the keys to why certain glioblastomas - the primary form of a deadly brain cancer - are resistant to drug therapy. [More]
Spring Bioscience launches PD-L1 (SP142) rabbit monoclonal immunohistochemistry antibody1

Spring Bioscience launches PD-L1 (SP142) rabbit monoclonal immunohistochemistry antibody1

Spring Bioscience (Spring), a member of the Roche Group, today announced the launch of its PD-L1 (SP142) rabbit monoclonal immunohistochemistry (IHC) antibody. [More]
Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

Researchers develop new integrated approach to pinpoint genetic "drivers" of cancer

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic "drivers" of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy. [More]

Leading European IT company invests $3 million in LogicNets

LogicNets, Inc., the web-based Expert Decision Support platform used for automating complex decision-making processes, announces an investment of $3 million from ICT Automatisering (Euronext: ICT:NA), a leading European IT services company headquartered in the Netherlands. [More]
Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists discover area of brain that could control person's motivation to exercise

Scientists at Seattle Children's Research Institute have discovered an area of the brain that could control a person's motivation to exercise and participate in other rewarding activities - potentially leading to improved treatments for depression. [More]
OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

OMRF receives $14.5 million grant from NIH to continue research on anthrax

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. [More]