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Tips to protect children from summer bugs

Tips to protect children from summer bugs

Mike Gittelman, MD, Co-Director, Comprehensive Children's Injury Center and the experts at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center want to make sure that families and children stay safe while playing outdoors this summer. [More]
Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Agricultural pesticides raise risk of autism in unborn children

Pregnant women who lived in close proximity to fields and farms where chemical pesticides were applied experienced a two-thirds increased risk of having a child with autism spectrum disorder or other developmental delay, a study by researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute has found. The associations were stronger when the exposures occurred during the second and third trimesters of the women's pregnancies. [More]
Health tips for global travellers

Health tips for global travellers

Nothing ruins a summer vacation faster than getting sick. "Remember that most diseases are transmitted by food, water and insects," says John A. Sellick, Jr., DO, University at Buffalo associate professor of medicine and hospital epidemiologist at Veterans Affairs Western New York Healthcare System. "So get vaccinated, keep insects off you as much as possible and be careful with what you put in your mouth." [More]

Physician offers tips to prevent tick bites

Warmer temperatures and longer days beckon outdoors enthusiasts and gardeners alike to get out and enjoy the season. [More]
CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

CDC identifies six new cases of people with Heartland virus

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in collaboration with health officials in Missouri and Tennessee have identified six new cases of people sick with Heartland virus: five in Missouri and one in Tennessee. The new cases, discovered in 2012 and 2013, are described today in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. [More]
Researchers find that single genetic mutation causes resistance to DDT and pyrethroids

Researchers find that single genetic mutation causes resistance to DDT and pyrethroids

Researchers from LSTM have found that a single genetic mutation causes resistance to DDT and pyrethroids (an insecticide class used in mosquito nets). With the continuing rise of resistance the research, published in the journal Genome Biology, is key as scientists say that this knowledge could help improve malaria control strategies. [More]
Physician offers helpful tips to a healthy summer

Physician offers helpful tips to a healthy summer

Summer is officially here, and for many, so is the threat of sunburn, bug bites and allergies. Deepti Shivakumar, MD, family practice at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, offers some helpful tips to a healthy summer. [More]
Cry proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis is lethal to Anopheles gambiae, the principal mosquito vector of malaria

Cry proteins in Bacillus thuringiensis is lethal to Anopheles gambiae, the principal mosquito vector of malaria

Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), led by Dr. Lee Bulla, have characterized a protein produced by the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti), which is highly toxic against Anopheles gambiae, the principal mosquito vector of malaria. [More]
Preschool children particularly vulnerable to food-borne toxins

Preschool children particularly vulnerable to food-borne toxins

In a sobering study published in the journal Environmental Health, researchers at UC Davis and UCLA measured food-borne toxin exposure in children and adults by pinpointing foods with high levels of toxic compounds and determining how much of these foods were consumed. [More]
Prenatal exposure to piperonyl butoxide increases risk of noninfectious cough in children

Prenatal exposure to piperonyl butoxide increases risk of noninfectious cough in children

Children exposed in the womb to the widely used pesticide additive piperonyl butoxide (PBO) have heightened risk of noninfectious cough at ages 5 and 6, according to researchers at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) at the Mailman School of Public Health and of Columbia University Medical Center. [More]
CDC reports worst West Nile virus outbreak in the U.S.

CDC reports worst West Nile virus outbreak in the U.S.

This past year's mild winter and wet spring could be contributing to the worst West Nile virus outbreak since the disease was first detected in the United States in 1999. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been more cases of the virus so far this year than any year. As of August 14, almost 700 cases had been reported across the nation, including 26 deaths. This year also marks the earliest reported case of West Nile virus in New Jersey. [More]
Tips to help homeowners tick-proof their yards

Tips to help homeowners tick-proof their yards

For more than 250,000 Americans, the bite of a deer tick meant the start of a life changing disease. With record warm temperatures and the start of May's National Lyme Disease Awareness Month, Mosquito Squad is on watch and has six tips to help homeowners tick-proof their yards. [More]
Negative effects of environmental toxicants can pass across generations

Negative effects of environmental toxicants can pass across generations

A Washington State University researcher has demonstrated that a variety of environmental toxicants can have negative effects on not just an exposed animal but the next three generations of its offspring. [More]
New malaria study in Africa offers evidence of method to bypass, or delay, insecticide resistance

New malaria study in Africa offers evidence of method to bypass, or delay, insecticide resistance

Indoor spraying with the insecticide bendiocarb has dramatically decreased malaria transmission in many parts of Benin, new evidence that insecticides remain a potent weapon for fighting malaria in Africa despite the rapid rise of resistance to an entire class of mosquito-killing compounds, according to a study published today in the October edition of The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. [More]
New head louse treatment shows promise

New head louse treatment shows promise

The common head louse has been seen to be resistant to time-tested treatments. However a new Food and Drug Administration-approved hair rinse, Natroba, could put an end to that. [More]
Ivermectin cream demonstrates activity against head lice eggs

Ivermectin cream demonstrates activity against head lice eggs

In a study sponsored by Topaz Pharmaceuticals Inc., a privately held specialty pharmaceutical company, scientists from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst presented data showing that a 0.5% ivermectin (IVM) cream formulation was active against lice eggs from permethrin resistant head lice. [More]

Insect Shield Repellent Apparel can protect against tick bites

A pilot study shows clothes treated with long-lasting insect repellant appear to offer outdoor workers significant protection against tick bites. [More]
Pyrethroid insecticides linked to delayed mental development in children

Pyrethroid insecticides linked to delayed mental development in children

When the EPA phased out the widespread residential use of chlorpyrifos and other organophosphorus (OP) insecticides in 2000-2001 because of risks to child neurodevelopment, these compounds were largely replaced with pyrethroid insecticides. But the safety of these replacement insecticides remained unclear, as they had never been evaluated for long-term neurotoxic effects after low-level exposure. [More]
FDA approves ParaPRO's Natroba for topical treatment of head lice

FDA approves ParaPRO's Natroba for topical treatment of head lice

ParaPRO, LLC announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved Natroba Topical Suspension, 0.9% to eliminate head lice. Natroba received approval as a prescription medication and is indicated for the topical treatment of head lice infestations in patients four years of age and older. [More]
Invasive plants increase risk of tick-borne disease in suburbs as well

Invasive plants increase risk of tick-borne disease in suburbs as well

"You don't have to go out into the woods anymore," says tick expert Brian F. Allan, PhD, who just completed a postdoctoral appointment at Washington University in St. Louis. "The deer are bringing tick-borne disease to us." [More]