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New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

New research may explain why people with blood group O get more severely ill from cholera

People with blood type O often get more severely ill from cholera than people of other blood types. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis may explain why. [More]
NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

NEJM publishes MINDACT trial results

Agendia, Inc., a world leader in personalized medicine and molecular cancer diagnostics, announces the peer-reviewed publication of the primary outcome results of the Microarray In Node-negative and 1 to 3 positive lymph node Disease may Avoid ChemoTherapy (MINDACT) clinical trial in the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM). (i, iii, iv) The publication demonstrates that 46% of breast cancer patients considered for chemotherapy, whose tumors are classified MammaPrint Low Risk, have excellent survival without chemotherapy, and can thus be candidates to avoid this toxic therapy. [More]
Interpace Diagnostics introduces new AccuCEA Insights for diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer

Interpace Diagnostics introduces new AccuCEA Insights for diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer

Interpace Diagnostics Group, a company that provides clinically useful molecular diagnostic tests and pathology services for evaluating risk of cancer by leveraging the latest technology in personalized medicine for better patient diagnosis and management, reported today that the Company has launched a new version of their AccuCEAâ„¢ product called "Insights" for Gastroenterologists who focus on diagnosing and treating pancreatic cancer. [More]
Study examines psychological impact of tumor gene testing in subset of NCI-MATCH patients

Study examines psychological impact of tumor gene testing in subset of NCI-MATCH patients

The ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group has received federal approval to add a quality-of-life research study, COMmunication and Education in Tumor Profiling (EAQ152) or 'COMET' to the NCI-MATCH (EAY131) trial, already underway. [More]
Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Study demonstrates safety and effectiveness of new SLN radiotracer in breast cancer patients

Determining whether breast cancer has spread to sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) is key to prognosis and treatment, making SLN mapping critical. [More]
Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Research provides insight into how harmless nasal bacteria help protect from diseases

Staphylococcus aureus is a common colonizer of the human body. Although, one quarter of the U.S. population live with the bacteria and never get sick, having S. aureus present in the nostrils is a risk for infections that range in severity from mild skin to life- threatening MRSA infections. [More]
Computers could be more accurate than pathologists in assessing lung cancer tissues, study shows

Computers could be more accurate than pathologists in assessing lung cancer tissues, study shows

Computers can be trained to be more accurate than pathologists in assessing slides of lung cancer tissues, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. [More]
Penn researchers develop computer model for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

Penn researchers develop computer model for designing drug-delivery nanocarriers

A team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has developed a computer model that will aid in the design of nanocarriers, microscopic structures used to guide drugs to their targets in the body. [More]
New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

New biochip test helps identify individuals at increased risk of Alzheimer's disease

Researchers today unveiled results from a new blood test to help identify which patients are at an elevated risk of Alzheimer's disease. [More]
E. coli bacteria capable of beneficial mutations at more variable rates than previously thought

E. coli bacteria capable of beneficial mutations at more variable rates than previously thought

Scientists studying how microbes evolve have long assumed that nearly all new genetic mutations get passed down at a predictable pace and usually without either helping or hurting the microbe in adapting to its environment. [More]
Brief smartphone exercises can help uplift mood

Brief smartphone exercises can help uplift mood

Brief, directed smartphone exercises can help quickly improve our mood. This is the latest finding from psychologists at the University of Basel and their international colleagues, reported in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. [More]
Personalized virtual brain model of epileptic patient could lead to more precise diagnosis

Personalized virtual brain model of epileptic patient could lead to more precise diagnosis

Researchers at CNRS, INSERM, Aix-Marseille University and AP-HM have just created a virtual brain that can reconstitute the brain of a person affected by epilepsy for the first time. [More]
Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Study reports sampling method used for new breast cancer tests may need to be refined

Not only is breast cancer more than one disease, but a single breast cancer tumor can vary within itself, a finding that University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute researchers discovered has the potential to lead to very different patient treatment plans depending on the tumor sample and diagnostic testing used. [More]
Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Updated guidelines for breast cancer increase number of patients who test HER2-positive

Changes to HER2 testing guidelines for breast cancer in 2013 significantly increased the number of patients who test HER2-positive, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Genetic profiling offers new avenues for treatment of cancer, study finds

Genetic profiling offers new avenues for treatment of cancer, study finds

Genetic profiling of cancer tumors provides new avenues for treatment of the disease, according to a study conducted by Sanford Health and recognized by the American Society of Clinical Oncology. [More]
Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Predictive power of computational toxicology demonstrated with crowd-sources scientific challenge

Results of the Systems Toxicology Computational Challenge have demonstrated how transcriptomics information present in the blood can be used to predict whether people have been exposed or not exposed to specific toxicants. [More]
Long-term antibiotic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer's disease through changes in gut bacteria

Long-term antibiotic treatment slows progression of Alzheimer's disease through changes in gut bacteria

Long-term treatment with broad spectrum antibiotics decreased levels of amyloid plaques, a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease, and activated inflammatory microglial cells in the brains of mice in a new study by neuroscientists from the University of Chicago. [More]
NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

NorthShore launches first clinical trial to examine GRS test for cancer risk assessment

Researchers at NorthShore University HealthSystem have launched the first clinical trial to investigate a genetic risk score (GRS) test to predict the risk of breast, prostate and colorectal cancer in the primary care setting. [More]
Cubresa receives US patent for flexible imaging sensors

Cubresa receives US patent for flexible imaging sensors

Instead of a cloak of invisibility hiding a person in television and movies, a new method that describes mounting many imaging sensors underneath a flexible substrate could reveal tumors within humans or animals. [More]
Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Novel biomarkers may offer solution for detecting autologous blood transfusion in athletes

Increasing oxygen delivery to muscles can help athletes perform better and give them the edge needed to win elite competitions. One of the best ways to increase oxygen supply is through blood manipulation, undergoing a blood transfusion that provides extra red blood cells and boosts oxygen levels. [More]
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