Personalized Medicine News and Research RSS Feed - Personalized Medicine News and Research

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Girls are born with weaker spines compared to boys, study finds

Looking at measurements of the vertebrae - the series of small bones that make up the spinal column - in newborn children, investigators at Children's Hospital Los Angeles found that differences between the sexes are present at birth. Results of the study, now online in advance of publication in the August issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, suggest that this difference is evolutionary, allowing the female spine to adapt to the fetal load during pregnancy. [More]
Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Moffitt researchers develop genetic test that analyzes sensitivity of tumors to radiation therapy

Recent advances in the understanding of cancer have led to more personalized therapies, such as drugs that target particular proteins and tests that analyze gene expression patterns in tumors to predict a patient's response to therapy. [More]
Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Deep Genomics set to bring the power of deep learning technologies to genomics

Evolution has altered the human genome over hundreds of thousands of years -- and now humans can do it in a matter of months. [More]
Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

Experts to highlight new diagnostic products, tools to identify heart attacks at 2015 AACC Annual Meeting

The 2015 AACC Annual Meeting & Clinical Lab Expo, the leading annual event for laboratory medicine, will open on Sunday, July 26, in Atlanta, Georgia. This year's meeting will host more than 400 educational sessions on topics ranging from personalized medicine and infectious diseases to point-of-care and laboratory-developed tests, and will feature more than 200 new cutting edge diagnostic products. [More]
Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Drug addiction expert uncovers molecular mechanisms that contribute to addiction resistance

Growing up in West Virginia, Jill Turner saw firsthand the kind of havoc that drug addiction can wreak. "I had a lot of friends who had very promising lives and promising careers ahead of them," the assistant professor in the South Carolina College of Pharmacy says, "but they ended up either overdosing or going to jail for drug-related stuff. It's one of the reasons I went into drug addiction research." [More]
Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

Transcranial magnetic stimulation holds promise for tinnitus patients

In the largest U.S. clinical trial of its kind funded by the Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, researchers at the VA Portland Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants. [More]
Medtronic launches GenCut Core Biopsy System for minimally invasive use with the superDimension navigation system for lung tissue biopsies

Medtronic launches GenCut Core Biopsy System for minimally invasive use with the superDimension navigation system for lung tissue biopsies

Medtronic now offers the GenCut(TM) core biopsy system, a unique lung tissue biopsy tool for use with the superDimension(TM) navigation system. The superDimension(TM) system enables a minimally invasive approach to accessing difficult-to-reach areas of the lung, which can aid in the diagnosis of lung cancer. [More]
Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

Research breakthrough opens door to a world of regenerative medicine for treating mitochondrial disease

A study led by Shoukhrat Mitalipov, Ph.D., and Hong Ma, M.D., Ph.D., at the Center for Embryonic Cell and Gene Therapy at Oregon Health & Science University and the Oregon National Primate Research Center has revealed the first critical step in developing novel gene and stem cell therapy treatments for patients with mitochondrial disease. [More]

Restore Health's specialty pharmacy division seeks accreditation from URAC

Restore Health, a company specializing in personalized medicine, announced today that its specialty pharmacy division is in the process of seeking accreditation from URAC, a Washington, D.C.-based healthcare accrediting organization that establishes quality standards for the healthcare industry. [More]
QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN's therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit to guide use of IRESSA for in NSCLC treatment

QIAGEN N.V. today received U.S. marketing (PMA) approval of its therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit (therascreen EGFR test) as a companion diagnostic to guide the use of AstraZeneca's IRESSA (gefitinib) in the treatment of patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). [More]
Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Shape of the cerebral cortex strongly correlates with genetic ancestry

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego and the School of Medicine have found that the three-dimensional shape of the cerebral cortex - the wrinkled outer layer of the brain controlling many functions of thinking and sensation - strongly correlates with ancestral background. [More]
Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a five-year, $12.8 million grant from the federal government to develop better ways to predict how patients will respond to the drugs they're given. [More]
Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, Stanford University, University of Valencia and IGENOMIX have discovered that chromosomal abnormalities in human embryos created for in vitro fertilization, or IVF, can be predicted within the first 30 hours of development at the cell-1 stage which results from the union of a female egg and male sperm. [More]
UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

UPCI scientists lead a panel of experts in revising guidelines for thyroid cancer tests

University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute scientists recently led a panel of experts in revising national guidelines for thyroid cancer testing to reflect newly available tests that better incorporate personalized medicine into diagnosing the condition. [More]
New research links mutations in TEX11 gene to some cases of male infertility

New research links mutations in TEX11 gene to some cases of male infertility

In the most severe form of male infertility, men do not make any measurable levels of sperm. This condition, called azoospermia, affects approximately 1 percent of the male population and is responsible for about a sixth of cases of male infertility. [More]
ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

ASHG declares 2015 recipients of annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education

The American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) has named Robert L. Nussbaum, M.D., chief medical officer of invitae and clinical professor of medicine (volunteer) at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF); Roderick R. McInnes, CM, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Lady Davis Institute at the Jewish General Hospital and Alva chair in human genetics, Canada Research chair in neurogenetics, and professor of human genetics and biochemistry at McGill University; and Huntington F. Willard, Ph.D., president and director of the Marine Biological Laboratory and professor of human genetics at the University of Chicago; as the 2015 recipients of its annual Award for Excellence in Human Genetics Education. [More]
Kalorama Information: NGS diagnostics can detect any number of genetic variants

Kalorama Information: NGS diagnostics can detect any number of genetic variants

Next generation sequencing may be able to bypass some of the downside of molecular testing and in doing so earn its place in clinical testing, according to Kalorama Information. [More]
SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

SLU researchers find way to stop growth of cancer cells by targeting the Warburg Effect

In research published in Cancer Cell, Thomas Burris, Ph.D., chair of pharmacology and physiology at Saint Louis University, has, for the first time, found a way to stop cancer cell growth by targeting the Warburg Effect, a trait of cancer cell metabolism that scientists have been eager to exploit. [More]
Immune Pharmaceuticals begins bertilimumab Phase II clinical trials in Bullous Pemphigoid, Ulcerative Colitis

Immune Pharmaceuticals begins bertilimumab Phase II clinical trials in Bullous Pemphigoid, Ulcerative Colitis

Immune Pharmaceuticals Inc. announced today that it has initiated its Phase II Ulcerative Colitis clinical trial and is scheduled to initiate its Phase II Bullous Pemphigoid clinical trial on July 1, 2015. Study Initiation is the training of hospital staff to allow for patient screening and immediate patient enrollment into the clinical trial upon selection. [More]
Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Biontech, Siemens enter into strategic collaboration on manufacture of personalized cancer vaccines

Siemens and BioNTech AG, a fully integrated biotechnology company developing truly personalized cancer immunotherapies, have entered into a strategic collaboration. [More]
Advertisement
Advertisement