Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
New injectable agent can potentially increase surgeon's ability to remove cancerous tumor during surgery

New injectable agent can potentially increase surgeon's ability to remove cancerous tumor during surgery

Doctors at the Duke University School of Medicine have tested a new injectable agent that causes cancer cells in a tumor to fluoresce, potentially increasing a surgeon's ability to locate and remove all of a cancerous tumor on the first attempt. The imaging technology was developed through collaboration with scientists at Duke, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Lumicell Inc. [More]
E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

E-cigarettes share similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products

A new study, published in the Journal of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology, found that e-cigarettes share a similar short-term safety profile as Nicorette products and are comparable in reducing tobacco withdrawal symptoms. [More]
Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

Scientists develop a method for cell replacement in diseased vessels

In industrialized countries, a particularly high number of people suffer from arteriosclerosis -- with fatal consequences: Deposits in the arteries lead to strokes and heart attacks. A team of researchers under the leadership of the University of Bonn has now developed a method for guiding replacement cells to diseased vascular segments using nanoparticles. [More]
Vanderbilt-led study questions about reporting genetic results to patients

Vanderbilt-led study questions about reporting genetic results to patients

A genetic test that suggests a patient may be at increased risk for potentially fatal heart rhythms is very often not as ominous as it sounds. [More]
Using antidepressant drug during first trimester of pregnancy may increase risk of birth defects

Using antidepressant drug during first trimester of pregnancy may increase risk of birth defects

Using paroxetine--a medication prescribed to treat conditions including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder--during the first trimester of pregnancy may increase newborns' risk of congenital malformations and cardiac malformations. That's the conclusion of a recent analysis published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology. [More]
Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

Drug-microbe interactions may contribute to adverse effects, lessen effectiveness of NSAID

A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) changed the composition and diversity of gut microbes, which in turn shaped how the drug is broken down and ultimately, cut its effectiveness, according to an animal study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. [More]
Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

Antiscarring paste can halt fibrosis caused by radiation treatment

An antiscarring paste when applied to the skin of mice halts fibrosis caused by the radiation used in cancer therapy. That is according to a study led by researchers at Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center to be published tomorrow in the January edition of the Journal of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, or FASEB. [More]

New guide provides valuable, unique overview of key properties of different drug targets

The new Concise Guide to PHARMACOLOGY 2015/2016 provides a valuable and unique overview of the key properties of more than 1,700 human drug targets, focusing on those exploited currently in the clinic or with future therapeutic potential. [More]
Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Researchers identify new gene that helps maintain chromosome number in cells

Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a gene called NORAD that helps maintain the proper number of chromosomes in cells, and that when inactivated, causes the number of chromosomes in a cell to become unstable, a key feature of cancer cells. [More]
Researchers identify liver-derived hormone that regulates sugar intake

Researchers identify liver-derived hormone that regulates sugar intake

We all love our sugar, especially during the holidays. Cookies, cake, and candy are simply irresistible. While sugar cravings are common, the physiological mechanisms that trigger our "sweet tooth" are not well defined. [More]

ABC/VEN-analysis presents simple and effective method towards rational use of medicines

Rational use of medicines remains to be one of the most challenging problems in health systems worldwide. Kazan Federal University researchers conducted a practical study to assess the impact of introducing evidence-based principles to the practice of medicine procurement in order to manage budget expenditures on medicines of a multidisciplinary health facility for the period of 2011-2014. [More]
Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Personalised approach may help identify patients’ response to certain cancer treatments

Many people in Russia know about the Dima Rogachev Centre - particularly those who have faced the challenge of child cancer. [More]
Zinc levels in breast milk may help identify breast-feeding problems

Zinc levels in breast milk may help identify breast-feeding problems

Zinc levels in breast milk may be able to serve as an indicator of breast function during lactation, according to Penn State health researchers. [More]
Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers identify transporters responsible for arsenic accumulation in plant seeds

Researchers from FIU's Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine Barry P. Rosen and Jian Chen, both from the Department of Cellular Biology and Pharmacology, are part of an international team that has identified how arsenic gets into the seeds of plants such as rice. T [More]
HBI-8000 granted orphan drug designation in Japan for treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma

HBI-8000 granted orphan drug designation in Japan for treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma

HUYA Bioscience International, Founder, CEO & Executive Chair, Dr. Mireille Gillings today announced that the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare granted HBI-8000 orphan drug designation in Japan for peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). [More]
Benjamin Wolozin receives $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research

Benjamin Wolozin receives $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research

Research that leads to improved therapies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients is one goal of Boston University School of Medicine professor of pharmacology and neurology Benjamin Wolozin, MD, PhD. He was one of six researchers awarded a two-year, $500,000 award in Alzheimer's Disease Drug Discovery Research by the Edward N. & Della L. Thome Memorial Foundation. [More]
Chronic alcohol use with repeated binge drinking can cause more damage to the liver

Chronic alcohol use with repeated binge drinking can cause more damage to the liver

Excessive alcohol consumption is a global public health issue. In the United States, binge drinking is the most common form - so common, in fact, that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports approximately one in six adults binge drinks about four times each month. [More]
Novel drug candidate prevents nerve cell damage in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

Novel drug candidate prevents nerve cell damage in mouse model of Parkinson's disease

A team of scientists at the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) and Longevity Biotech, Inc., has demonstrated that neuroprotection could be attained in preclinical models by a novel drug candidate that changes immune responses. [More]
Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies on the way for difficult-to-treat head and neck cancer

Novel strategies are on the way for difficult-to-treat and advanced head and neck cancer, the most heterogeneous group of malignancies which are generally associated with poor survival, and encouraging results have been presented at the first ESMO Asia 2015 Congress in Singapore. [More]
Researchers identify how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections affect the brain

Researchers identify how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections affect the brain

Researchers have discovered how immune cells triggered by recurrent Strep A infections enter the brain, causing inflammation that may lead to autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders in children. [More]
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