Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
'Achilles heel' in metabolic pathway could stop growth of lung cancer cells

'Achilles heel' in metabolic pathway could stop growth of lung cancer cells

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found an "Achilles heel" in a metabolic pathway crucial to stopping the growth of lung cancer cells. [More]
UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UCSF researchers receive five NIH awards for high-risk scientific research projects

UC San Francisco researchers received five awards announced this week by the National Institutes of Health for high-risk, high-reward scientific research projects. Their work will focus on novel approaches for diagnosing and treating diseases ranging from autoimmune and chronic inflammatory diseases, to cancer, diabetes and neurological disorders. [More]
Many US patients with liver cancer do not receive proper treatment

Many US patients with liver cancer do not receive proper treatment

Many US patients with liver cancer-even those with early stage disease that can often be cured-do not receive treatment for their disease, according to an analysis of studies published between 1989 and 2013. [More]
New method for extracting potential bone-producing cells from human fat

New method for extracting potential bone-producing cells from human fat

Within our fat lives a variety of cells with the potential to become bone, cartilage, or more fat if properly prompted. This makes adipose tissue, in theory, a readily available reservoir for regenerative therapies such as bone healing if doctors can get enough of those cells and compel them to produce bone. [More]
Modified form of niclosamide drug may hold key to battling type 2 diabetes

Modified form of niclosamide drug may hold key to battling type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes affects an estimated 28 million Americans according to the American Diabetes Association, but medications now available only treat symptoms, not the root cause of the disease. [More]
Open payments database debuts, detailing financial connections between physicians and drug makers

Open payments database debuts, detailing financial connections between physicians and drug makers

Consumer advocates have pushed for years for this kind of government database in an effort to protect against physicians' conflicts of interest, to safeguard patient care and to prevent unnecessary costs to public health programs. [More]
West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

West Virginia University receives NIH award as part of BRAIN initiative

In its first wave of funding awards, a new presidential project aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the human brain has pledged its support to a group of researchers led by West Virginia University faculty working to change the future of brain imaging. [More]
Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

Prenatal maternal stress exposure to Quebec ice storm predicts epigenetic profile of offspring

The number of days an expectant mother was deprived of electricity during Quebec's Ice Storm (1998) predicts the epigenetic profile of her child, a new study finds. [More]
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to honor 8 scientists for achievements in psychiatric research

Brain & Behavior Research Foundation to honor 8 scientists for achievements in psychiatric research

The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation will honor eight scientists with its 2014 Outstanding Achievement Prizes for work delving into psychiatric disorders that affect one in four people. The awards, which celebrate the transformative power of neuroscience and psychiatric research to improve the lives of people with mental illness, will be presented at the Foundation's National Awards Dinner at the Pierre Hotel. [More]
VCU receives $6 million grant to develop safe, effective treatments for cocaine addiction

VCU receives $6 million grant to develop safe, effective treatments for cocaine addiction

Virginia Commonwealth University has received a five-year, $6 million grant for clinical research and education directed toward the identification, evaluation and development of safe and effective treatments for cocaine addiction. [More]
International organizations join forces to develop inhaled form of oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage

International organizations join forces to develop inhaled form of oxytocin for postpartum hemorrhage

An international group of public and private organizations is collaborating to accelerate development of an innovative heat-stable and low-cost inhaled form of oxytocin to manage postpartum hemorrhage in resource-poor settings. [More]
Elsevier honored at BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony

Elsevier honored at BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced today that 28 of its professional and scholarly products were honored at the British Medical Association's annual BMA Medical Book Awards ceremony at BMA House in London on Sept. 22, 2014. [More]
Desaturation 'area under the curve' may help in monitoring patient safety during procedures

Desaturation 'area under the curve' may help in monitoring patient safety during procedures

The "area under the curve of oxygen desaturation" (AUCDesat) may provide a more sophisticated approach to monitoring blood oxygen levels during procedures using sedation, according to a study published in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Rosuvastatin drug more effective among prediabetic patients, finds new study

Cardiovascular disease is the leading causes of death worldwide and high cholesterol plays a major role in accelerating its progression. Medical practitioners have turned to statins as a treatment to decrease cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins such as small dense lipoproteins (sdLDL), considered to be especially harmful. [More]
Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Researchers gain new knowledge about complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease

Using advanced computer models, neuroscience researchers at the University of Copenhagen have gained new knowledge about the complex processes that cause Parkinson's disease. The findings have recently been published in the prestigious Journal of Neuroscience. [More]
NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

NIH awards grant to scientist to link drugs, genes and diseases

The National Institutes of Health wants to make the process of finding new drugs faster and better. The effort will help all 27 of its research institutes and centers. So, the nation's medical research agency awarded Tudor Oprea, MD, PhD, a 2-year $4.9 million grant to develop a tool scientists can use to link information about drugs, diseases and genes. [More]
Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding common epilepsy drug to morphine can result in better pain control, say IU researchers

Adding a common epilepsy drug to a morphine regimen can result in better pain control with fewer side effects. Moreover, the combination can reduce the dosage of the opioid needed to be effective, according to a team of pain researchers at Indiana University. [More]
Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

Collaborative study takes important step toward finding targeted treatments for bladder cancer

The story of cancer care seems so simple: find the mutated gene that causes cancer and turn it off or fix it. But rarely does a single gene cause cancer. More often, many genes are altered together to drive the disease. So the challenge becomes sorting out which altered genes are the most to blame in which cancers. [More]
Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

Discovery reveals promising target for treatment of end-stage heart failure

As a heart fails, losing its ability to squeeze blood through the circulatory system, the body releases a neurohormone that interferes with the heart's best chance to improve contractility, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers show in a study published September 9th in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation. [More]
Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

Research shown to increase chances of babies surviving neonatal resuscitation

For several Edmonton parents, the work being done by University of Alberta researchers Po-Yin Cheung and Georg Schm-lzer could not be more meaningful. [More]