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Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Researchers find evidence that protein involved in regulating inflammation has anti-septic effects

Sepsis represents a serious complication of infection and is one of the leading causes of death and critical illness worldwide due in part to the lack of effective therapies. A report in the American Journal of Pathology provides evidence from both mouse and human studies that SHARPIN, a protein involved in regulating inflammation, has anti-septic effects. These findings may spur development of novel sepsis treatments. [More]
Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Study reveals new activation mechanism for protein kinases

Protein kinases, most scientists would agree, regulate nearly every aspect of cell life. It is no surprise, then, that having faulty protein kinases may lead to a number of human conditions, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes. [More]
Compound from unique blue-green algae could be key to next anti-cancer drug

Compound from unique blue-green algae could be key to next anti-cancer drug

Could a slippery glob of algae hold the key to the next anti-cancer drug? According to new research into a compound produced by a unique community of blue-green algae, the answer could be yes. [More]
Structure-based approach could lead to effective HIV vaccine

Structure-based approach could lead to effective HIV vaccine

It's been known for some time that the immune system can produce antibodies capable of "neutralizing" HIV, and stopping the AIDS-causing virus dead in its tracks. [More]
Researchers identify possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease

Researchers identify possible genetic basis for coronary artery disease

For many people, coronary artery disease, or CAD—the buildup of plaque in the heart's arteries—is an unfortunate part of aging. By studying the genetic makeup of those who manage to maintain clear arteries into old age, researchers have identified a possible genetic basis for the disease, as well as potential new opportunities to prevent it. [More]
Chronic lack of sleep, irregular sleep-wake cycles may increase risk of Parkinson's disease

Chronic lack of sleep, irregular sleep-wake cycles may increase risk of Parkinson's disease

Chronic lack of sleep and irregular sleep-wake cycles may be risk factors of Parkinson's disease, new work by researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University suggests. In an animal model, the researchers show that disturbances in circadian rhythm that exist before Parkinson's onset dramatically worsen motor and learning deficits brought on by the disease. [More]
Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

Blocking blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help delay cancer relapse

A study by researchers at Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine has found that blocking the blood supply of small cell lung cancer tumors may help reduce their growth and delay the regrowth process after treatment. Small cell lung cancer is considered the most lethal of all lung cancers. [More]
Joslin scientists identify new mechanism in development of obesity-induced insulin resistance

Joslin scientists identify new mechanism in development of obesity-induced insulin resistance

In obesity, the body's immune system can treat tissues as if they are suffering from a low-grade chronic infection. This obesity-induced inflammation is an important contributor to insulin resistance, a condition that can progress into type 2 diabetes. [More]
Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers design more effective version of FDA-approved epilepsy drug with fewer side effects

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Arts & Sciences have designed a more effective version of an FDA-approved epilepsy drug with the potential for fewer side effects, according to a study published on March 22 in Molecular Pharmacology. The experimental agent also could prove to be a treatment for tinnitus and other disorders caused by volatile neural signaling. [More]
Researchers develop new technique to study blood vessel inflammation

Researchers develop new technique to study blood vessel inflammation

Nanotechnology has led to better diagnostic techniques and more effective treatments for a variety of illnesses. Tiny devices measuring between 1 and 100 micrometers--one micrometer is equal to one millionth of a meter--enable scientists to observe cell activity and deliver drugs to individual cells--a breakthrough that is on the verge of revolutionizing precision medicine for treatment of diseases such as cancer. [More]
Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

Oral administration of cyclotide may improve symptoms of multiple sclerosis

MedUni Vienna has made a crucial development in the treatment of Multiple Sclerosis (MS): Together with his team and the research group led by Gernot Schabbauer, international partners from Australia, Germany and Sweden, Christian Gruber, Chief Researcher at the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology has demonstrated in an animal model that, following treatment with a specially synthesized plant peptide (cyclotide), there is no further progression of the usual clinical signs of multiple sclerosis. [More]
Protease inhibitors may prevent cardiovascular disease risk caused by HIV medications

Protease inhibitors may prevent cardiovascular disease risk caused by HIV medications

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 37 million people are living with HIV. Antiviral medications are used to control the disease and prevent its progression to AIDS. [More]
Promising UCLA discovery could lead to new method for improving cancer treatments

Promising UCLA discovery could lead to new method for improving cancer treatments

A promising new discovery by UCLA scientists could lead to a new method of identifying cancer patients that express high levels of an enzyme and are more likely to respond to cancer treatments. [More]
Transient contractions could be new target for therapeutic intervention in urinary bladder dysfunction

Transient contractions could be new target for therapeutic intervention in urinary bladder dysfunction

Researchers at the University of Vermont College of Medicine have made a discovery that helps explain how we know when to empty our bladders and may lead to new therapeutic interventions for bladder dysfunction. [More]
Anticonvulsant medication gabapentin effectively reduces common complication of PONV

Anticonvulsant medication gabapentin effectively reduces common complication of PONV

The anticonvulsant medication gabapentin—already a useful part of strategies to control pain after surgery—also effectively reduces the common complication of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), reports a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

Parasitic flatworm rejuvenates its skin to survive in human bloodstream

A parasitic flatworm that infects hundreds of millions of people in the developing world is able to survive in the bloodstream for decades by constantly renewing its skin - a mechanism that could inform potential new treatments against infection. [More]
Mycophenolate mofetil drug seems safe, effective in treating autoimmune hepatitis

Mycophenolate mofetil drug seems safe, effective in treating autoimmune hepatitis

New research indicates that mycophenolate mofetil, a drug that is usually used to prevent rejection after kidney, heart or liver transplant, seems safe and effective in treating autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a serious chronic liver disease that mainly affects women. [More]
KORs could be potential drug target for treatment of addiction, anxiety disorders

KORs could be potential drug target for treatment of addiction, anxiety disorders

University of North Carolina researchers uncovered a cellular mechanism by which kappa opioid receptors (KOR) drive anxiety. These proteins inhibit the release of the neurotransmitter glutamate in a part of the brain that regulates emotion. [More]
Paracetamol does not meet minimum standard of clinical effectiveness in osteoarthritis patients

Paracetamol does not meet minimum standard of clinical effectiveness in osteoarthritis patients

In a large-scale analysis of pain-relief medication for osteoarthritis, researchers found that paracetamol does not meet the minimum standard of clinical effectiveness in reducing pain or improving physical function in patients with knee and hip osteoarthritis. [More]
Biomarkers may provide novel approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplant patients

Biomarkers may provide novel approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive therapy in organ transplant patients

Recently discovered biomarkers may provide valuable new approaches to monitoring immunosuppressive drug therapy in organ transplant recipients--with the potential for individualized therapy to reduce organ rejection and minimize side effects, according to a special article in the April issue of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring, official journal of the International Association of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring and Clinical Toxicology. [More]
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