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Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
New drugs show promise as first antidote for radiation exposure

New drugs show promise as first antidote for radiation exposure

University of Virginia School of Medicine researchers have identified promising drugs that could lead to the first antidote for radiation exposure that might result from a dirty bomb terror attack or a nuclear accident such as Chernobyl. [More]
Early exposure to nicotine can affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth

Early exposure to nicotine can affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth

Early exposure to nicotine can trigger widespread genetic changes that affect formation of connections between brain cells long after birth, a new Yale-led study has found. The finding helps explains why maternal smoking has been linked to behavioral changes such as attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder, addiction and conduct disorder. [More]
Study finds that TPC2 protein regulates melanin production

Study finds that TPC2 protein regulates melanin production

A year and a half ago, researchers at Brown University found a molecular gas pedal for melanin production. Now they've found a brake. For scientists, the finding deepens not only the basic understanding of how eyes, skin and hair gain color, but also what perhaps can be done in disorders, such as albinism, when that doesn't happen. [More]
Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Small drug-like molecule that alters perception of food may hold key to extending human healthspan

Researchers at the Buck Institute have shown a new effect on aging via a small drug-like molecule that alters the perception of food in the nematode C. elegans. Publishing in Aging Cell, researchers "tricked" the worm's metabolism into a state of caloric restriction, extending the animal's lifespan by 50 percent. [More]
New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

New technique to grow blood vessels could accelerate growth of regenerative medicine

In addition the technique to grow the blood vessels in a 3D scaffold cuts down on the risk of transplant rejection because it uses cells from the patient. It was developed by researchers from the University of Bath's Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, working with colleagues at Bristol Heart Institute. [More]
JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

JBCPP journal publishes new evidence for clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy

New evidence for the clinical efficacy of cannabis therapy is presented in the latest issue of the Journal of Basic and Clinical Physiology and Pharmacology, a De Gruyter publication. [More]
Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Researchers identify trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response

Scientists at the University of Bristol have identified the trigger for immune cells' inflammatory response - a discovery that may pave the way for new treatments for many human diseases. [More]
Regular use of laxatives may flatten rigidity found in Parkinson's disease

Regular use of laxatives may flatten rigidity found in Parkinson's disease

In a recent retrospective analysis, investigators discovered that the year-on-year increase in rigidity found in Parkinson's disease flattened off with the regular use of laxatives to manage constipation. [More]
High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

High levels of p62 protein in liver linked to cancer recurrence

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have discovered that high levels of the protein p62 in human liver samples are strongly associated with cancer recurrence and reduced patient survival. [More]
Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Gene editing technology helps excise segment of HIV-1 DNA from genomes of living animals

Using gene editing technology, researchers at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University have, for the first time, successfully excised a segment of HIV-1 DNA - the virus responsible for AIDS - from the genomes of living animals. [More]
Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

Closely related molecule can mimic effect of PKMzeta in mice

New research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center shows that mice devoid of PKMzeta, a molecule previously identified by SUNY Downstate scientists as essential to memory formation and storage, recruit a closely related molecule, PKCiota/lambda, to make up for the missing PKMzeta. [More]
Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Novel therapeutic approach to treat leukaemia patients

Cancer cells have an abnormal cell division and survival machinery - they grow faster than they die. For their permanent development, they produce an excess of growth factors and nutrients and block the body's own safety mechanisms. [More]
Antipsychotic drug users may twice as likely to experience heart attack than non-users

Antipsychotic drug users may twice as likely to experience heart attack than non-users

A review of nine observational studies found evidence supporting an increased risk of heart attacks in patients taking antipsychotic drugs. [More]
Combination of COX-2-selective NSAID with PPI can reduce risk of stomach, intestinal ulcers

Combination of COX-2-selective NSAID with PPI can reduce risk of stomach, intestinal ulcers

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)—including ibuprofen, diclofenac, naproxen and others—are commonly used pain medications that are generally safe but may increase the risk of developing stomach and intestinal ulcers. [More]
ISSCR releases updated guidelines for stem cell research, development of new therapies

ISSCR releases updated guidelines for stem cell research, development of new therapies

The International Society for Stem Cell Research, the world's largest professional organization of stem cell scientists, today released newly updated guidelines for stem cell research and the development of new clinical therapies. [More]
Low adiponectin levels may lead to development of PTSD symptoms

Low adiponectin levels may lead to development of PTSD symptoms

Individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) relive past traumas again and again, bound in a virtual prison of their memories. [More]
Genetic variations that increase PKC alpha activity may influence development of Alzheimer's disease

Genetic variations that increase PKC alpha activity may influence development of Alzheimer's disease

In Alzheimer's disease, plaques of amyloid beta protein accumulate in the brain, damaging connections between neurons. [More]

Set of 16 different substances in the breath can help identify IBS patients

There is currently no specific diagnostic test for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but now researchers have identified a combination of 16 different substances in the breath that, when measured together, can accurately distinguish IBS patients from people without the condition. [More]
Sophisticated technology helps model and simulate optimal dose for pediatric ependymoma patients

Sophisticated technology helps model and simulate optimal dose for pediatric ependymoma patients

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have used sophisticated pharmacologic modeling and simulation to translate preclinical findings into a successful phase I clinical trial of a chemotherapy agent for treatment of ependymoma. The research marked the first time the approach has been used to calculate drug doses for a clinical trial in pediatric brain tumor patients. [More]
Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Serum biomarkers can help predict risk of IBD development and complications

Years before inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is diagnosed and symptoms exist, biomarkers are already circulating that can help predict risk not only of disease development but also of complications, according to research published online last week, which will also appear in the June 15th print issue of Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics. [More]
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