Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
BUSM investigators receive MRA's Jackie King Young Investigator Awards

BUSM investigators receive MRA's Jackie King Young Investigator Awards

Boston University School of Medicine researchers Neil Joseph Ganem, PhD and Anurag Singh, PhD, each have received the Jackie King Young Investigator Awards from the Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA), the largest private funder of melanoma research. Both serve as assistant professors of pharmacology & experimental therapeutics and medicine. [More]
Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

Next-generation tissue implant allows neuroscientists to wirelessly control neurons inside the brains of mice

A study showed that scientists can wirelessly determine the path a mouse walks with a press of a button. Researchers at the Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, and University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, created a remote controlled, next-generation tissue implant that allows neuroscientists to inject drugs and shine lights on neurons deep inside the brains of mice. [More]
AMRI purchases Gadea Pharmaceutical Group for $174 million

AMRI purchases Gadea Pharmaceutical Group for $174 million

AMRI today announced that it has acquired all the outstanding shares of Gadea Pharmaceutical Group, a privately-held company located in Valladolid, Spain, specializing in technically complex active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and finished drug product. [More]
SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU researcher awarded NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award to solve pain-killer problem

SLU pain researcher Daniela Salvemini has been awarded the NIH's Cutting-Edge Basic Research Award (CEBRA) to solve an alarming problem: pain killers that are capable of quelling terrible pain also carry debilitating side effects and significant risk of addiction. [More]
New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

New drug DSM265 shows potential to cure, prevent malaria

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center and in Australia have shown that a drug currently in testing shows potential to cure malaria in a single dose and offers promise as a preventive treatment as well. [More]
Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt receives $12.8 million federal grant to develop better ways to predict effects of drugs in patients

Vanderbilt University Medical Center has received a five-year, $12.8 million grant from the federal government to develop better ways to predict how patients will respond to the drugs they're given. [More]
Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

Potential molecular link identified between excess fat in the blood and blood vessel recovery in ischemia

The buildup of fat in the blood makes a bad situation worse - it not only raises a person's risk for heart attack or stroke but also impairs the growth of new blood vessels. How excess fat in the blood - a condition known as hyperlipidemia - blocks vessel growth was unclear, but new work by researchers at Temple University School of Medicine shows that a molecule known as caspase-1 plays a central role and that preventing its activity could be the key to building new blood vessels and restoring blood supply to oxygen-starved tissues. [More]
Elsevier, NCI implement two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets in caNanoLab

Elsevier, NCI implement two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets in caNanoLab

Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, and the US National Cancer Institute, a world-leading institute for cancer research, today announced that they have implemented two-way linking between research articles on ScienceDirect and datasets stored in NCI's cancer Nanotechnology Laboratory (caNanoLab) data portal. [More]
Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

Johns Hopkins, IOCB Prague sign drug discovery research agreement

The Johns Hopkins Drug Discovery (JHDD) program, created with the mission of identifying novel drug targets arising from Johns Hopkins faculty research and translating them into new therapeutics, and the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, The Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague) have entered into a five-year drug discovery research agreement to develop small-molecule and peptide drugs for a range of therapeutic areas including neurological diseases, cancer and gastrointestinal disorders. [More]
Finding could help improve health and function of the kidney in elderly people

Finding could help improve health and function of the kidney in elderly people

As advances in medicine allow individuals to live longer, people are facing unique age-related health challenges. As they age, organs such as the kidneys become more susceptible to injury, and their ability to self-repair is decreased. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a cellular signal that causes kidney cells to die, making the kidneys prone to injury. [More]
Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Chromosomal abnormalities in embryos created for IVF can be predicted at earliest stage of human development

Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University, Stanford University, University of Valencia and IGENOMIX have discovered that chromosomal abnormalities in human embryos created for in vitro fertilization, or IVF, can be predicted within the first 30 hours of development at the cell-1 stage which results from the union of a female egg and male sperm. [More]
UC Davis scientists identify significant driver of neuropathic pain

UC Davis scientists identify significant driver of neuropathic pain

Scientists at the University of California, Davis, have identified a key mechanism in neuropathic pain. The discovery could eventually benefit millions of patients with chronic pain from trauma, diabetes, shingles, multiple sclerosis or other conditions that cause nerve damage. [More]
Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics begins Phase 1a study of ABX-1431 investigational endocannabinoid system modulator

Abide Therapeutics, a developer of innovative pharmaceuticals, announced today initiation of enrollment and dosing of the first subject in a Phase 1a clinical study of ABX-1431, a first-in-class, investigational endocannabinoid system modulator. [More]
Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Researchers identify link between autoimmune diseases, medications and Long QT syndrome

Mohamed Boutjdir, PhD, professor of medicine, cell biology, and physiology and pharmacology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, has led a study with international collaborators identifying the mechanism by which patients with various autoimmune and connective tissue disorders may be at risk for life-threatening cardiac events if they take certain anti-histamine or anti-depressant medications. [More]
Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

Sialic acid attached to brain cells may affect brain structure, cause neurological problems

New research from The Johns Hopkins University suggests that a molecule commonly found “decorating” brain cells in higher animals, including humans, may affect brain structure. [More]
NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

NDSU's Stephen O'Rourke awarded NIH grant to conduct cardiovascular research

Stephen O'Rourke, professor of pharmaceutical sciences at North Dakota State University, Fargo, has received a $435,000 grant from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health to conduct cardiovascular research. [More]
St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort may cause same adverse reactions as antidepressants

St John's Wort can produce the same adverse reactions as antidepressants, and serious side effects can occur when the two are taken together, according to new University of Adelaide research. [More]
Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

Histones steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life, find Mount Sinai researchers

For decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. [More]
Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Concert Pharmaceuticals’ precision deuteration platform can enhance metabolic properties of drugs

Substituting deuterium for certain hydrogen atoms in molecules has been shown to enhance the metabolic properties of a number of drugs and provides a promising approach to the discovery and development of innovative drug products. [More]

Sialic acid may play significant role in certain brain disorders

A new report published in the July 2015 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that a common molecule found in higher animals, including humans, affects brain structure. This molecule may play a significant role in how brain cells communicate, possibly shedding light on the underlying causes of certain brain disorders. [More]
Advertisement