Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Active ingredient dextromethorphan may help people with Type 2 diabetes

Active ingredient dextromethorphan may help people with Type 2 diabetes

The active ingredient dextromethorphan, which is contained in many over-the-counter cough remedies, has been shown to improve blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes (diabetes mellitus). That was the finding of a recent international study, in which the Center for Physiology and Pharmacology of MedUni Vienna played a significant part and which has now been published in the leading medical journal "Nature Medicine". [More]
Study defines new subtype of 'lethal' prostate cancer

Study defines new subtype of 'lethal' prostate cancer

A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published in the journal Cancer Research defines a new, distinct subtype of "lethal" prostate cancer marked by the loss of two genes, MAP3K7 and CHD1. Overall about 10 percent of men with prostate cancer will die from the disease. [More]
Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

Researchers discover gene associated with congenital anomaly of urinary tract

An interdisciplinary team of researchers under the direction of the University of Bonn Hospital have discovered a gene which is associated with a rare congenital anomaly of the urinary tract called classic bladder exstrophy. [More]
McGill researchers identify key mechanism by which environmental factors influence traits

McGill researchers identify key mechanism by which environmental factors influence traits

Until now scientists have believed that the variations in traits such as our height, skin colour, tendency to gain weight or not, intelligence, tendency to develop certain diseases, etc., all of them traits that exist along a continuum, were a result of both genetic and environmental factors. But they didn't know how exactly these things worked together. [More]
Wistar awarded grant to create Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium

Wistar awarded grant to create Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium

The Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Foundation awarded The Wistar Institute a $1.1 million grant to create The Jayne Koskinas Ted Giovanis Breast Cancer Research Consortium at The Wistar Institute. The Consortium will support the highly synergistic, multidisciplinary research projects of three Wistar scientists dedicated to advancing breast cancer research. [More]
Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Research findings offer new insights into pathophysiology of PTSD

Researchers at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System and University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in New York and the United Kingdom, have identified genetic markers, derived from blood samples that are linked to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The markers are associated with gene networks that regulate innate immune function and interferon signaling. [More]
InMed, University of Debrecen partner to develop novel therapies to treat ocular allergies

InMed, University of Debrecen partner to develop novel therapies to treat ocular allergies

InMed Pharmaceuticals Inc. announces it has formed an exclusive strategic collaboration with the University of Debrecen, Hungary, to develop novel phytocannabinoid-based therapies to treat ocular allergic symptoms. [More]
Naturally-occurring protein in the brain can curb binge alcohol drinking

Naturally-occurring protein in the brain can curb binge alcohol drinking

A new study led by University of North Carolina School of Medicine researchers has found that a naturally-occurring protein in the brain can act to suppress binge alcohol drinking, a major public health problem estimated to cost the U.S. more than $170 billion each year. [More]
Researchers develop robust screening method for routine measurement of drugs in exhaled breath

Researchers develop robust screening method for routine measurement of drugs in exhaled breath

Drug testing is most commonly performed using urine samples. The methodology and regulations for reliable urine testing are well developed and can be considered the current gold standard for drug testing. [More]
CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

CPRIT awards research and recruitment grants to improve cancer research

The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers more than $7.5 million in research grants to improve diagnostic and therapeutic services and research relating to cancers of the brain, breast, throat, and bone, as well as to improve scientific understanding of cancer biology. [More]
Severe mortality-associated diseases less prevalent in members of long-lived families

Severe mortality-associated diseases less prevalent in members of long-lived families

Recent research from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) confirms that severe mortality-associated diseases are less prevalent in the families of long-lived individuals than in the general population. The Journals of Gerontology, Series A will publish these findings in the article titled, "Are Members of Long-Lived Families Healthier than Their Equally Long-Lived Peers? Evidence from the Long Life Family Study" on March 5, 2015. [More]
Non-viral gene therapy provides relief for diabetics with constant foot pain

Non-viral gene therapy provides relief for diabetics with constant foot pain

Walking barefoot on sand "felt like walking on glass" for Keith Wenckowski, who has lived with type-one diabetes for more than two decades. [More]
GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

GeneSight test better predicts antidepressant outcomes for patients with depression

The combinatorial, multi-gene GeneSight test has been found to better predict antidepressant treatment outcomes for patients with depression, and their use of health care resources, than any of the individual genes that comprise the test, according to a peer-reviewed analysis by investigators from the Mayo Clinic and Assurex Health, and published online by The Pharmacogenomics Journal. [More]
Oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic target for improving social function in psychiatric disorders

Oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic target for improving social function in psychiatric disorders

Researchers at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, have shown inducing the release of brain oxytocin may be a viable therapeutic option for enhancing social function in psychiatric disorders, including autism spectrum disorders and schizophrenia. [More]
Symbiomix Therapeutics announces positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 1 clinical program

Symbiomix Therapeutics announces positive results from SYM-1219 Phase 1 clinical program

Symbiomix Therapeutics, a late-stage, privately held biopharmaceutical company developing innovative medicines for serious women's health infections, today announced results from its Phase 1 clinical program demonstrating that its lead product candidate, SYM-1219, was safe and well tolerated and had predictable pharmacokinetics (PK), and that contraceptive efficacy for birth control pills would not be altered by SYM-1219 administration. [More]
Novel drug mechanism shows promise against glioma cells

Novel drug mechanism shows promise against glioma cells

Researchers at UC Davis have developed and characterized a molecule that interferes with the internal regulation of cancer cells, causing them to self-destruct. This novel mechanism was found to be effective against glioma cells - responsible for a usually fatal type of brain cancer - and could be applicable to other highly aggressive cancers. [More]
Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

Study on spider venom may lead to new class of potent painkillers

New research shows that seven compounds of the countless found in spider venom block a key step in the body's ability to pass pain signals to the brain. The hunt for a medicine based on just one of these compounds, which would open up a new class of potent painkillers, is now a step closer according to new research published in the British Journal of Pharmacology. [More]
Existing drug could help treat MS, other neurological diseases

Existing drug could help treat MS, other neurological diseases

Damage to myelin, the fatty insulator that enables communication between nerve cells, characterizes multiple sclerosis (MS) and other devastating neurological diseases. [More]
Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

Modified measles vaccine effective against Chikungunya virus, study finds

A modified, conventional measles vaccine has the potential to act against the Chikungunya virus. This is the result of a study at the University Clinic for Clinical Pharmacology of the MedUni Wien (Medical University of Vienna), which has now been published in the top journal "The Lancet Infectious Diseases". [More]
U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

U-M researchers reveal key role of two enzymes that help the body to remove cholesterol, other lipids

With the aid of X-ray crystallography, researchers at the University of Michigan have revealed the structures of two closely related enzymes that play essential roles in the body's ability to metabolize excess lipids, including cholesterol. [More]
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