Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Zinc acetate lozenges may be effective in treating common cold

Zinc acetate lozenges may be effective in treating common cold

Zinc acetate lozenges may reduce the duration of the common cold by nearly 3 days, according to a recent analysis. [More]
Researchers use FRET to make activation of AMPA receptors optically visible

Researchers use FRET to make activation of AMPA receptors optically visible

Our brain is a high-performance computer. One of the key players in this complex system is the AMPA-type glutamate receptor. It ensures that neurotransmission proceeds at a breakneck pace from cell to cell. [More]
Researchers find distinct, non-identical differences among retroviruses

Researchers find distinct, non-identical differences among retroviruses

In the most comprehensive study of its kind, researchers in the report that most types of retroviruses have distinct, non-identical virus structures. [More]
Deutetrabenazine may help improve chorea symptoms in patients with HD

Deutetrabenazine may help improve chorea symptoms in patients with HD

People with Huntington disease (HD) experienced improvements in chorea while taking deutetrabenazine (SD-809) compared to placebo, according to a paper published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. [More]
Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Study provides insight into why individual mycobacteria respond differently to antibiotics

Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in the world, infecting almost 10 million people each year. Treating the disease can be challenging and requires a combination of multiple antibiotics delivered over several months. [More]
Study links proteins involved in cell division to insulin signaling

Study links proteins involved in cell division to insulin signaling

Proteins that play key roles in the timing of cell division also moonlight in regulating blood sugar levels, UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have found. [More]
Older adults with high LDL-C live longer than peers with low levels of same cholesterol, say experts

Older adults with high LDL-C live longer than peers with low levels of same cholesterol, say experts

A University of South Florida professor and an international team of experts have found that older people with high levels of a certain type of cholesterol, known as low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C), live as long, and often longer, than their peers with low levels of this same cholesterol. [More]
ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

ESCMID-ASM conference aims to speed up drug development processes for drug-resistant infections

The European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) are jointly organizing a conference in Vienna from 21 – 23 September 2016 to help researchers accelerate the development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant infections. [More]
New book highlights advances, challenges in development of nanotheranostics for personalized medicine

New book highlights advances, challenges in development of nanotheranostics for personalized medicine

The future of medicine is now dawning upon us.Nanomedicines demonstrate the capability to enhance drug properties by offering protection from degradation, enabling controlled release and biodistribution and increasing bioavailability. [More]
Scientists uncover how changes in metabolism of embryonic stem cells can help engineer new blood vessels

Scientists uncover how changes in metabolism of embryonic stem cells can help engineer new blood vessels

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine have uncovered how changes in metabolism of human embryonic stem cells help coax them to mature into specific cell types — and may improve their function in engineered organs or tissues. [More]
Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

Long-term suppression of neurotransmitter acetylcholine may lead to dementia-like changes in the brain

A new study from Western University is helping to explain why the long-term use of common anticholinergic drugs used to treat conditions like allergies and overactive bladder lead to an increased risk of developing dementia later in life. [More]
Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

Highly efficient bacterial agent could improve treatment of Wilson disease

In the 'Journal of Clinical Investigation', scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München describe a small peptide that very efficiently binds excess copper from liver cells. This molecule comes from a bacterium's bag of tricks and could be suitable for treating Wilson disease. [More]
Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Study suggests how expression, function of nAChRs regulated in AD

Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) have been pursued for decades as potential molecular targets to treat cognitive dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) due to their demonstrated role in processes underlying cognition such as synaptic facilitation, and theta and gamma wave activity. [More]
Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

Scientists study fundamentals of tumour surveillance by immune system in mice models

The body's defences detect and eliminate not only pathogens but also tumour cells. Natural killer cells (NK-Cells) are specifically activated by chemical messengers, the Cytokines, to seek and destroy tumour cells. [More]
New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

New research helps better understand role of TIP60 in allowing tumors to survive in low-oxygen environments

In summer 2011, University of Colorado Cancer Center investigators Joaquín Espinosa, PhD, and Matthew Galbraith, PhD, taught a summer symposium on gene expression at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, New York. [More]
Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Study sheds new light on how overeating may lead to more eating

Research is finally beginning to shed light on some of the reasons that extra weight is difficult to shed permanently. Now, a new study has uncovered another method by which the gut senses how much food a person eats and relays that to the brain. [More]
New experimental antibiotic can help combat MRSA infections

New experimental antibiotic can help combat MRSA infections

A new experimental antibiotic developed by a team of scientists at Rutgers University successfully treats the deadly MRSA infection and restores the efficacy of a commonly prescribed antibiotic that has become ineffective against MRSA. [More]

Sleep disturbing medicines may not contribute to sleep disturbances in general population

Medicines that carry warnings about sleep disturbances do not seem to contribute to the amount of sleep disturbances in the general population, according to new ‘real world’ research. [More]
New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

New vaccine found safe, effective against Toxic Shock Syndrome

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a severe circulatory and organ failure caused by bacterial toxins, usually triggered by bacteria from the Staphylococcus group. Researchers from MedUni Vienna's Department of Clinical Pharmacology, in collaboration with the company Biomedizinische Forschungsgesellschaft mbH in Vienna, have now developed the world's first safe and effective vaccine against this disease and successfully tested it in a Phase I trial. [More]
Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

Tackling healthcare challenges in a changing world: an interview with Professor Jeremy Nicholson

As individuals and as populations our risks of getting diseases are determined partly genetically and partly from the environment that we live in. An important part of that environment that mediates between the outside world and the inside world of our bodies is the microbiome. [More]
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