Pharmacology News and Research RSS Feed - Pharmacology News and Research

Pharmacology is the study of how chemical substances interact with living systems. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals. The field encompasses drug composition and properties, interactions, toxicology, therapy, and medical applications and antipathogenic capabilities.
Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Researchers shed light on the dual action of aspirin

Hugely popular non-steroidal anti-inflammation drugs like aspirin, naproxen (marketed as Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) all work by inhibiting or killing an enzyme called cyclooxygenase - a key catalyst in production of hormone-like lipid compounds called prostaglandins that are linked to a variety of ailments, from headaches and arthritis to menstrual cramps and wound sepsis. [More]
Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Research findings call for clinical testing of relevant drugs to prevent NASH

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common affliction, affecting almost 30 percent of Americans, with a significant number suffering from its most severe form, called non-alcoholic steatohepatitis or NASH, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In recent years, NASH has become the leading cause of liver transplantation. [More]
Research findings may lead to novel target for chemoresistant cancer cells

Research findings may lead to novel target for chemoresistant cancer cells

Dartmouth cancer researchers at Norris Cotton Cancer Center found a means of causing the elimination of a protein that maintains cancer cell viability; the results of the study appear in the August 8 issue of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. [More]
Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Hippo pathway identifies and prevents progression of abnormal cells into cancer

Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine report that a tumor suppressor pathway, called the Hippo pathway, is responsible for sensing abnormal chromosome numbers in cells and triggering cell cycle arrest, thus preventing progression into cancer. [More]
Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Vitamin D deficiency linked to higher surgical risk

Patients with low blood levels of vitamin D are at increased risk of death and serious complications after noncardiac surgery, suggests a study in Anesthesia & Analgesia. [More]
Finding suggests that aspirin could play role in reducing breast cancer mortality

Finding suggests that aspirin could play role in reducing breast cancer mortality

Researchers have discovered that women who had been prescribed aspirin regularly before being diagnosed with breast cancer are less likely to have cancer that spread to the lymph-nodes than women who were not on prescription aspirin. These women are also less likely to die from their breast cancer. [More]
Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Clinical trial tests COXEN model in bladder cancer to find promising treatment

Imagine being able to match a cancer's genes to the best treatment. That's the promise of COXEN (CO eXpression ExtrapolatioN) - a computer program that looks at a panel of cancer genes in a patient's tumor to predict whether it will respond to chemotherapy. [More]
Researchers identify mechanism used by deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans

Researchers identify mechanism used by deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans

Researchers have identified the mechanism used by the deadly MERS virus to transmit from bats to humans. Bats are a native reservoir for MERS and the finding could be critical for understanding the animal origins of the virus, as well as preventing and controlling the spread of MERS and related viruses in humans. [More]
Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium announces review in Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology finds gene therapy for subset of heart disease patients ‘highly warranted’

Cardium Therapeutics, an operating unit of Taxus Cardium Pharmaceuticals Group Inc. (Trading Symbol: CRXM) has announced the publication of a review article in the Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology that concludes a gene therapy product promoting the growth of blood vessels is “highly warranted” to treat about 1 million U.S. heart-disease patients and 6 million more worldwide who are either ineligible or poor candidates for traditional angioplasty, stent placement or bypass surgery. [More]
Study provides new insight into neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

Study provides new insight into neuroprotective effects of Asiaticoside

In the central nervous system, Asiaticoside has been shown to attenuate in vitro neuronal damage caused by exposure to β-amyloid. [More]
Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Researchers discover how immunosensory system attacks viruses on a molecular level

Our immunosensory system detects virus such as influenza via specific characteristics of viral ribonucleic acid. Previously, it was unclear how the immune system prevents viruses from simply donning molecular camouflage in order to escape detection. [More]
TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS acquires novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota

TAXIS Pharmaceuticals, Inc. today announced the acquisition of a group of novel antimicrobial drug candidates from Biota Pharmaceuticals Inc. of Atlanta, GA. [More]
Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

Patient with mechanical heart pump receives new gene therapy for heart failure

For the first time in the world, a patient with a mechanical heart pump has received a new gene therapy for heart failure at Harefield Hospital, London. [More]
Three Scottish universities to offer a new course in stratified medicine

Three Scottish universities to offer a new course in stratified medicine

Stratified medicine, which uses the genetic make-up of patients and their differing responses to drugs to create more personalised and effective forms of treatment, has been hailed as one of the most important concepts to emerge in 21st century clinical science. [More]
Comprehensive database collecting information about microRNAs, multiMiR

Comprehensive database collecting information about microRNAs, multiMiR

Your genes are blueprints for proteins, and molecules called microRNA can help to determine how often these genetic blueprints are manufactured into proteins. Researchers often ask what microRNA regulates a gene related to disease. [More]
AMRI total revenue increases 15% to $68.2 million in second quarter 2014

AMRI total revenue increases 15% to $68.2 million in second quarter 2014

AMRI today reported financial and operating results for the second quarter ended June 30, 2014. [More]
Researchers to track fate in body of materials used in breakthrough medicines

Researchers to track fate in body of materials used in breakthrough medicines

The University of Liverpool has been awarded -2 million to become a leading centre in the UK for tracking the fate in the body of materials used in breakthrough medicines. [More]
Repurposed drug used to treat ovarian cancer gives positive results

Repurposed drug used to treat ovarian cancer gives positive results

A repurposed drug originally used to treat ovarian cancer saw positive results for patients with advanced peritoneal cancers during a phase I clinical trial at The University of Kansas Cancer Center. [More]
Artesunate drug can be used to control asthma, finds NUS study

Artesunate drug can be used to control asthma, finds NUS study

Asthmatic patients may soon have a more effective way to control the condition, thanks to a new pharmacological discovery by researchers from the National University of Singapore. [More]
Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Exploiting chemical response from body's immune system to attack pathogens using copper

Harnessing a natural process in the body that pumps lethal doses of copper to fungi and bacteria shows promise as a new way to kill infectious microbes, a team of scientists at Duke University report. [More]